Greetings from Bury Park

Inspiration for the film 'Blinded by the Light'

Greetings from Bury Park

Sarfraz Manzoor was two years old when his family emigrated from Pakistan to join his father in Bury Park, Luton. His teenage years were a constant battle to reconcile being both British and Muslim. But when his best friend introduced him to Bruce Springsteen, his life changed for ever. In this affectionate and timely memoir, Manzoor retraces his journey from the frustrations of his childhood to his reaction to the tragedies of 9/11 and 7/7. Original, darkly tender and wryly amusing, this is an inspiring tribute to the power of music to transcend race and religion and a moving account of a relationship between father and son

Blinded by the Light (Greetings from Bury Park Movie Tie-In)

Blinded by the Light (Greetings from Bury Park Movie Tie-In)

Soon to be a major motion picture--a charming memoir about the impact of Bruce Springsteen's music on a Pakistani boy growing up in 1970s' Britain. Both a tribute to The Boss and a story of personal discovery, Blinded by the Light (originally published as Greetings from Bury Park) is a warm, irreverent, and exceptionally perceptive memoir about how music transcends religion and race. Featuring a new Afterword by the author.thor.

Greetings from Bury Park

Race. Religion. Rock 'n' Roll

Greetings from Bury Park

Sarfraz Manzoor Was Two Years Old When His Family Emigrated From Pakistan To Join His Father In Bury Park, Luton. His Teenage Years Were A Constant Battle To Reconcile Being Both British And Muslim. But When His Best Friend Introduced Him To Bruce Springsteen, His Life Changed For Ever. In This Affectionate And Timely Memoir, Manzoor Retraces His Journey From The Frustrations Of His Childhood To His Reaction To The Tragedies Of 9/11 And 7/7. Original, Darkly Tender And Wryly Amusing, This Is An Inspiring Tribute To The Power Of Music To Transcend Race And Religion And A Moving Account Of A Relationship Between Father And Son.

Bruce Springsteen – Like a Killer in the Sun. Songtexte

Bruce Springsteen – Like a Killer in the Sun. Songtexte

Erste autorisierte und einzige deutsche Ausgabe von Springsteens Lyrics Bruce Springsteens Lyrics erscheinen zusammengenommen als Kapitel eines großen amerikanischen Romans, den er in den 1970ern begonnen hat und der in diesem Buch nachvollzogen wird. Kritiker halten den "Chronisten des amerikanischen Alltags" (Der Spiegel) und seine Lyrics inzwischen für ebenso wichtig für die amerikanische Literatur wie die Werke von Fitzgerald, Carver oder Whitman. Anders als Bob Dylan versteckt sich Springsteen nicht hinter immer neuen Masken, er erzählt unverstellt von dem American Dream und seinen Schattenseiten – von der Provinz, von der Flucht aus ihr und dem Sog der Freiheit, von den Chancen der Selbstsuche wie auch von Armut, Rassismus oder Polizeigewalt. Leonardo Colombati entschlüsselt überraschende Hintergründe und Einflüsse. Die Wucht von Springsteens Bildern wie auch die leisen Erschütterungen in seiner Sprache macht Heinz Rudolf Kunze in seinen kongenialen Übersetzungen erfahrbar. Das Buch bietet: • Einleitung, Biographie und Kommentare von Leonardo Colombati • 100 Songs im Original und in deutscher Übersetzung von Heinz Rudolf Kunze • umfangreiches Bonusmaterial, Diskographie u. ä.

Modern Britain

Modern Britain


Culture, Diaspora, and Modernity in Muslim Writing

Culture, Diaspora, and Modernity in Muslim Writing

Fiction by writers of Muslim background forms one of the most diverse, vibrant and high-profile corpora of work being produced today - from the trail-blazing writing of Salman Rushdie and Hanif Kureishi, which challenged political and racial orthodoxies in the 1980s, to that of a new generation including Mohsin Hamid, Nadeem Aslam and Kamila Shamsie. This collection reflects the variety of those fictions. Experts in English, South Asian, and postcolonial literatures address the nature of Muslim identity: its response to political realignments since the 1980s, its tensions between religious and secular models of citizenship, and its manifestation of these tensions as conflict between generations. In considering the perceptions of Muslims, contributors also explore the roles of immigration, class, gender, and national identity, as well as the impact of 9/11. This volume includes essays on contemporary fiction by writers of Muslim origin and non-Muslims writing about Muslims. It aims to push beyond the habitual populist 'framing' of Muslims as strangers or interlopers whose ways and beliefs are at odds with those of modernity, exposing the hide-bound, conservative assumptions that underpin such perspectives. While returning to themes that are of particular significance to diasporic Muslim cultures, such as secularism, modernity, multiculturalism and citizenship, the essays reveal that 'Muslim writing' grapples with the same big questions as serve to exercise all writers and intellectuals at the present time: How does one reconcile the impulses of the individual with the requirements of community? How can one 'belong' in the modern world? What is the role of art in making sense of chaotic contemporary experience?

Hatters, Railwaymen and Knitters

Travels through England’s Football Provinces

Hatters, Railwaymen and Knitters

Daniel Gray is about to turn thirty. Like any sane person, his response is to travel to Luton, Crewe and Hinckley. After a decade's exile in Scotland, he sets out to reacquaint himself with England via what he considers its greatest asset: football. Watching teams from the Championship (or Division Two as any right-minded person calls it) to the South West Peninsula Premier, and aimlessly walking around towns from Carlisle to Newquay, Gray paints a curious landscape forgotten by many. He discovers how the provinces made the England we know, from Teesside's role in the Empire to Luton's in our mongrel DNA. Moments in the histories of his teams come together to form football's narrative, starting with Sheffield pioneers and ending with fan ownership at Chester, and Gray shows how the modern game unifies an England in flux and dominates the places in which it is played. Hatters, Railwaymen and Knitters is a wry and affectionate ramble through the wonderful towns and teams that make the country and capture its very essence. It is part-football book, part-travelogue and part-love letter to the bits of England that often get forgotten, celebrated here in all their blessed eccentricity.

Bruce Springsteen and Philosophy

Darkness on the Edge of Truth

Bruce Springsteen and Philosophy

Known as the working man's poet, the Boardwalk prophet, or simply, the Boss. If "love is a banquet at which we feed," Bruce Springsteen has provided much food for thought. In this collection of metaphysical probes, a gang of E-street philosophers will undress Bruce's deeper mysteries like irresistible Jersey girls. Can Springsteen settle the nature-nurture debate through his song "Born to Run"? What do the famous philosopher Ricuoer and Springsteen have in common in their depiction of time? These die-hard Springsteen fans, who just happen to be philosophers, compile an entertaining handbook to the field of Springsteen studies, covering topics like Springsteen's connection to Marx and the proletariat, Springsteen's concept of the soul, and his status as a poet.

Book Review Index 2009

Cumulation

Book Review Index 2009