Private Gardens of the Hudson Valley

Private Gardens of the Hudson Valley

Private Gardens of the Hudson Valley surveys the majestic landscape that borders the Hudson River, an area rich in history and unique garden designs. The scenery, which encompasses riverfront meadows, craggy hills, and long open valleys, is inherently dramatic. Twenty-six private gardens are presented here, chosen to establish a sense of place and to convey the romance of the landscape. John Hall's photographs give a privileged view of the life within, while Jane Garmey's warm and engaging narrative traces the development of the gardens and the great pleasure their owners take in nurturing them. As Garmey notes in her introduction, each of these gardens has been made by the owner, and special attention given to the transition between the cultivated garden and the grandeur of the larger landscape beyond. The splendid setting of the Hudson Valley encompasses an almost infinite variety of design approaches from formal and traditional to naturalistic and an equal range of scale from multiple gardens within a vast estate to charmingly diminutive spaces between historic village houses. All have much to tell us about the complexity, challenges, and finally the unforgettable pleasure of making a garden.

Gardens of the Hudson Valley

Gardens of the Hudson Valley

The majesty of the Hudson River has captivated both artists and visitors for generations, and the gardens along its banks have a special character. Those created for the Gilded Age estates are more formal; private gardens respond directly to the rolling landscape and mature forests. The area is a crucible for the development of American landscape design since the major figures—Alexander Jackson Downing, Frederick Law Olmsted, Beatrix Farrand, and Fletcher Steele—all worked in the Hudson Valley. Gardens of the Hudson Valley focuses on the historic landscape and how gardens have been integrated into it. Photographers Steve Gross and Susan Daly have selected twenty-five gardens between Yonkers and Hudson, including famous estate gardens like Kykuit, Boscobel, the Vanderbilt Mansion, and Olana (all open to the public) and private gardens that combine sweeping views and lush plantings. Garden writers Susan Lowry and Nancy Berner describe each of the gardens in detail, focusing on the history of the site and the strategies for design and plant materials.

The Hudson

America's River

The Hudson

Frances F. Dunwell presents a rich portrait of the Hudson and of the visionary people whose deep relationship with the river inspires changes in American history and culture. Lavishly illustrated with color plates of Hudson River School paintings, period engravings, and glass plate photography, The Hudson captures the spirit of the river through the eyes of its many admirers. It shows the crucial role of the Hudson in the shaping of Manhattan, the rise of the Empire State, and the trajectory of world trade and global politics, as well as the river's influence on art and architecture, engineering, and conservation.

Gardens of the Garden State

Gardens of the Garden State

New Jersey is full of gardens, from the huge growing fields that bring New Yorkers fresh tomatoes, corn, and blueberries to the many arboretums and county parks throughout the state. Here the focus is on outstanding public gardens, such as Greenwood Gardens, a uniquely American example of arts and crafts design, and magnificent private gardens by well-known firms including Innocenti & Webel, Ferruchio Vitali, and Fernando Caruncho. A temperate climate makes it possible to grow a wide range of plants, while a complex topography-including mountains, rolling hills, flat basins, and the scrubby Pine Barrens-demands diverse approaches to design. Featured are gardens throughout the state-from a wildlife garden filled with frogs and butterflies and a lighthouse garden near Cape May, to elegant formal gardens of Short Hills, Bernardsville, and Oldwick, to Skylands, with its magnificent specimen trees, extensive woodland and rock gardens, and a noted lilac collection close to the New York border.

Hudson Valley Voyage

Through the Seasons, Through the Years

Hudson Valley Voyage

A beautiful tribute to the Hudson River and the 400th anniversary of Henry Hudson’s voyage.

The Hudson Valley

a cultural guide

The Hudson Valley

Outlines recommendations for exploring the contemporary cultural scene in the Hudson Valley, in a tribute to the 400th anniversary of Hudson's voyage that features county-by-county profiles of more than five hundred performing-arts centers, museums, parks, and other venues of interest.

City Green

Public Gardens of New York

City Green

Gardens are an integral part of any cityscape, and New York City boasts a wealth of outdoor spaces that enhance the urban environment and provide visual pleasure to residents and visitors. City Green celebrates the richness and diversity of New York's public gardens. While the New York Botanical Garden, the High Line, and Central Park are familiar names and places, other venues, such as Roosevelt Park, the Inwood Heather Garden, Brooklyn Bridge Park, and the Chinese Scholar's Garden, remain relatively under-visited and under-appreciated. In addition to parks and three botanical gardens, public horticulture in New York encompasses community- and conservancy-sponsored gardens, vest pocket parks, museum gardens, and even indoor atria. City Green: Public Gardens of New York focuses on the vitality, variety, and beauty of the city's garden landscapes in a time when the appreciation for how gardens enhance the quality of urban life is on the rise. With text by noted garden writer Jane Garmey and photography by distinguished landscape and design photographer Mick Hales, this book takes readers inside many of New York's gardens, including the Cloisters, Green-Wood Cemetery, Carl Schurz Park, Wave Hill, the 9/11 Memorial Garden, the Noguchi Museum, and the Willis Ave. Community Garden. City Green is an essential companion for New Yorkers and the ideal gift for garden-lovers, tourists, and former New York residents nostalgic for the city's parks and gardens.

Guidebook to Historic Houses and Gardens in New England

71 Sites from the Hudson Valley East

Guidebook to Historic Houses and Gardens in New England

When Willit Mason retired in the summer of 2015, he and his wife decided to celebrate with a grand tour of the Berkshires and the Hudson Valley of New York. While they intended to enjoy the areas natural beauty, they also wanted to visit the numerous historic estates and gardens that lie along the Hudson River and the hills of the Berkshires. But Mason could not find a guidebook highlighting the regions houses and gardens, including their geographic context, strengths, and weaknesses. He had no way of knowing if one location offered a terrific horticultural experience with less historical value or vice versa. Mason wrote this comprehensive guide of 71 historic New England houses and gardens to provide an overview of each site. Organized by region, it makes it easy to see as many historic houses and gardens in a limited time. Filled with family histories, information on the architectural development of properties and overviews of gardens and their surroundings, this is a must-have guide for any New England traveler.

Landscape Gardens on the Hudson, a History

The Romantic Age, the Great Estates, & the Birth of American Landscape Architecture

Landscape Gardens on the Hudson, a History

The Hudson Valley's role in the mid-1800s as the birthplace of American landscape architecture is explored through the romantically designed grounds of the valley's historic estates and the works of “the father of American landscape design,” Hudson Valley native Andrew Jackson Downing. Landscape gardening is a hidden but unequaled historic resource along the Hudson River, exhibiting some of the most significant designed 19th-century landscapes in America. Landscape Gardens on the Hudson is the first comprehensive study of the development of these landscapes and the important role they played in the cultural underpinnings of the young United States—a legacy that continues today with the design of America's urban parks and nearly every rural or suburban home. This garden design work in the 19th century stands at the center of historic events that decisively shaped the concept of scenic beauty in America and became a core value of the American dream. It was undeniably indigenous, because it reflected America's “genius of the place”—the genius loci of the Hudson River Valley. Fueled by sympathetic political, religious and nationalistic principles, America's cultural aspirations joined with the nation's physical assets, the landscape, to achieve a distinctive artistic expression. Most famously, this aesthetic found expression in the landscape paintings of the Hudson River School artists. Less well known is how this aesthetic determined the way Americans transformed the natural world around them.The sense of America as “Nature's Nation” was a central theme for romanticism in the early republic. In America, wild nature was an essential component of the “genius of the place.” America was seen as special, distinguished by its wilderness condition. “In the beginning,” wrote the English philosopher John Locke, “all the world was America.” This romantic sensibility expressed itself along the Hudson in the “Picturesque” landscape design approach, wherein art is hidden so that a fully natural and vernacular expression could prevail. These thoughts were exemplified at Washington Irving's Sunnyside and other cottage-style properties, and it reached a magnificent aesthetic crescendo with Olana, the unique and famed landscape creation by renowned Hudson River School painter Frederic Edwin Church. Olana has been rightly called by a recent commentator “one of the most perfectly realized Romantic landscape gardens in the world.” First, the predominantly English history of landscape gardening is traced as a prelude to landscape gardening in America. Then, the evolution of landscape design in New York's long colonial period is described at such historic sites as Philipse Manor (Yonkers), Livingston Manor (Clermont), Van Cortlandt Manor (Croton), and Schuyler House (Albany). After the Revolutionary War, with the blossoming of the Romantic period, landscape gardening achieved a regional culmination that was unique in America. A dozen of the finest examples on the Hudson are presented. The history and design of such well-known historic properties as David Hosack's Hyde Park (today's Vanderbilt Mansion), Irving's Sunnyside, the Livingstons' Montgomery Place, Samuel F. B. Morse's Locust Grove, and Olana are interpreted not as historic houses alone, but as landscape garden compositions. The historical commentary of Andrew Jackson Downing (1815–1852) is included at each site visited. Downing was a Hudson Valley native and America's leading landscape gardener in the antebellum years. His protégé, Calvert Vaux, coined the term “landscape architect” and later teamed with Frederick Olmsted on the design of Central Park (1858), a triumph of romantic landscape design and the inspiration for nearly every American public park created in the subsequent 150 years.The text is illustrated with over 140 period and contemporary images, including plans, photographs, bird's-eye views, paintings and engravings, many in color.

Phantoms of the Hudson Valley

The Glorious Estates of a Lost Era

Phantoms of the Hudson Valley

These stately mansions recall the aristocratic luxury of a bygone era, with their turrets and spires, rambling porticos, gleaming columns, and glaring gargoyles. Through her masterful photography and darkroom work, Randall has created some of the restles