Forget Memory

Creating Better Lives for People with Dementia

Forget Memory

Bold, optimistic, and innovative, Basting's cultural critique of dementia care offers a vision for how we can change the way we think about and care for people with memory loss.

Memory and Forgetting

Memory and Forgetting

An explanation of the main models of memory and the various approaches used in its study. This is followed by a study of the theories of forgetting and practical applications of memory research.

Memory, History, Forgetting

Memory, History, Forgetting

Why do major historical events such as the Holocaust occupy the forefront of the collective consciousness, while profound moments such as the Armenian genocide, the McCarthy era, and France's role in North Africa stand distantly behind? Is it possible that history "overly remembers" some events at the expense of others? A landmark work in philosophy, Paul Ricoeur's Memory, History, Forgetting examines this reciprocal relationship between remembering and forgetting, showing how it affects both the perception of historical experience and the production of historical narrative. Memory, History, Forgetting, like its title, is divided into three major sections. Ricoeur first takes a phenomenological approach to memory and mnemonical devices. The underlying question here is how a memory of present can be of something absent, the past. The second section addresses recent work by historians by reopening the question of the nature and truth of historical knowledge. Ricoeur explores whether historians, who can write a history of memory, can truly break with all dependence on memory, including memories that resist representation. The third and final section is a profound meditation on the necessity of forgetting as a condition for the possibility of remembering, and whether there can be something like happy forgetting in parallel to happy memory. Throughout the book there are careful and close readings of the texts of Aristotle and Plato, of Descartes and Kant, and of Halbwachs and Pierre Nora. A momentous achievement in the career of one of the most significant philosophers of our age, Memory, History, Forgetting provides the crucial link between Ricoeur's Time and Narrative and Oneself as Another and his recent reflections on ethics and the problems of responsibility and representation. “His success in revealing the internal relations between recalling and forgetting, and how this dynamic becomes problematic in light of events once present but now past, will inspire academic dialogue and response but also holds great appeal to educated general readers in search of both method for and insight from considering the ethical ramifications of modern events. . . . It is indeed a master work, not only in Ricoeur’s own vita but also in contemporary European philosophy.”—Library Journal “Ricoeur writes the best kind of philosophy—critical, economical, and clear.”— New York Times Book Review

Trauma and Memory

Trauma and Memory

Taking an in-depth look at the most current research on memory of traumatic events, this book contains state-of-the-art data in the controversial area of repressed memory. Contributors, major figures in the field, integrate multidisciplinary findings into proposals for coherent treatment, and legal and social policy and practices.

Assimilative Memory, Or How to Attend and Never Forget

Assimilative Memory, Or How to Attend and Never Forget

An infallible method of remembering proper names is (1) Get the name when introduced. If not quite sure, ask for it. (2) Pronounce the name aloud whilst looking at the person. Do this several times, if possible. The object is to produce a concurrence or connection between the sight-image of the Person and a sound-image of his Name. (3) To help the ear for sound, always pronounce everyone's name aloud whenever you meet him. This helps nature. -from "How to Remember Proper Names When Introduced" Memorize anything quickly with Prof. A. Loisette's "System of Memory Training," including his "Three Laws of Memory or of Thinking": . Discover the Cure of Mind Wandering . Learn any series of proper names . Memorize the longest sets of numeric figures almost instantly . Learn prose and poetry by heart . Speak in public without notes . Internalize rules and principles in academic realms of arts, sciences, and history . And more This 1896 guide to remembering anything and everything is as practical and useful today as it was a century ago. "PROF. A. LOISETTE" was the pseudonym of memory-expert Marcus Dwight Larrowe.

The Memory Illusion

Remembering, Forgetting, and the Science of False Memory

The Memory Illusion

THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER 'Truly fascinating.' Steve Wright, BBC Radio 2 - Have you ever forgotten the name of someone you’ve met dozens of times? - Or discovered that your memory of an important event was completely different from everyone else’s? - Or vividly recalled being in a particular place at a particular time, only to discover later that you couldn’t possibly have been? We rely on our memories every day of our lives. They make us who we are. And yet the truth is, they are far from being the accurate record of the past we like to think they are. In The Memory Illusion, forensic psychologist and memory expert Dr Julia Shaw draws on the latest research to show why our memories so often play tricks on us – and how, if we understand their fallibility, we can actually improve their accuracy. The result is an exploration of our minds that both fascinating and unnerving, and that will make you question how much you can ever truly know about yourself. Think you have a good memory? Think again. 'A spryly paced, fun, sometimes frightening exploration of how we remember – and why everyone remembers things that never truly happened.' Pacific Standard

Envisioning the Past Through Memories

How Memory Shaped Ancient Near Eastern Societies

Envisioning the Past Through Memories

Memory is a constructed system of references, in equilibrium, of feeling and rationality. Comparing ancient and contemporary mechanisms for the preservation of memories and the building of a common cultural, political and social memory, this volume aims to reveal the nature of memory, and explores the attitudes of ancient societies towards the creation of a memory to be handed down in words, pictures, and mental constructs. Since the multiple natures of memory involve every human activity, physical and intellectual, this volume promotes analyses and considerations about memory by focusing on various different cultural activities and productions of ancient Near Eastern societies, from artistic and visual documents to epigraphic evidence, and by considering archaeological data. The chapters of this volume analyse the value and function of memory within the ancient Near Eastern and Egyptian societies, combining archaeological, textual and iconographical evidence following a progression from the analysis of the creation and preservation of both single and multiple memories, to the material culture (things and objects) that shed light on the impact of memory on individuals and community.

Representations of Forgetting in Life Writing and Fiction

Representations of Forgetting in Life Writing and Fiction

This book primarily focuses on the concept of forgetting, with particular emphasis on how we can trace the forgotten in contemporary life writing and memory texts. It consists of two main parts: the first concentrates on life writing in particular and what the author calls “scenes of forgetting”; the second examines both fiction and autobiographies that deal with questions of collective memory/forgetting. The book’s principal aim is to map methods and strategies writers employ when writing the forgotten – it argues that forgetting is a constant companion in any memory text and plays a decisive role in the memory work performed in the texts. The main theoretical objective is to examine carefully the connection between collective memory and personal memory, by drawing from two disciplines at once: memory studies and theories on life writing. By considering both areas of research, the conclusions of this study are able to feed into both theoretical perspectives.

Practical Memory

A Simple Guide to Help You Remember More & Forget Less in Your Everyday Life

Practical Memory

Simple, Practical, “Common Sense” Tips to Remember More & Forget Less You are here because your memory is not as good as you would like. Why might this be? Well, the internet has all the facts we need at our fingertips. Then cameras store our pictures, and smartphones contain the phone numbers of everyone we know. With so much information being recorded for us, the brain has little that it actually needs to remember. This may be good for productivity, but is bad for our memories. The problem is when we apply our memories less and less, our ability to remember can also get worse and worse…. The solution here is simple. We must practice and exercise our memories. Thankfully, in Practical Memory you will discover simple systems and exercises anyone can use to improve their memory. This way, you can see progress immediately, without needing to spend precious time learning difficult techniques (as with many other memory books). Internationally bestselling author I. C. Robledo has examined “ordinary” people with powerful memories. Studying such people is useful because they tend to use simple, practical “common sense” systemsthat we could all benefit from. Now, those tips are all compiled here into one convenient resource. Inside, you will discover: - How to recall even the most difficult memories (e.g., on the tip of your tongue) - Why intending or planning to remember is a key step to building memories - How to stop forgetting your purse/wallet, phone, camera, etc. - Why too much routine can be bad for your ability to remember - How to remember where you parked the car - Special tips for how to remember new locations when traveling (and stop getting lost) Start building a more powerful memory today with Practical Memory. Pick up your copy today by scrolling to the top of the page and clicking BUY NOW.