John Williams's Film Music

Jaws, Star Wars, Raiders of the Lost Ark, and the Return of the Classical Hollywood Music Style

John Williams's Film Music

John Williams is one of the most renowned film composers in history. He has penned unforgettable scores for Star Wars, the Indiana Jones series, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, Jaws, Superman, and countless other films. Fans flock to his many concerts, and with forty-nine Academy Award nominations as of 2014, he is the second-most Oscar-nominated person after Walt Disney. Yet despite such critical acclaim and prestige, this is the first book in English on Williams’s work and career. Combining accessible writing with thorough scholarship, and rigorous historical accounts with insightful readings, John Williams’s Film Music explores why Williams is so important to the history of film music. Beginning with an overview of music from Hollywood’s Golden Age (1933–58), Emilio Audissino traces the turning points of Williams’s career and articulates how he revived the classical Hollywood musical style. This book charts each landmark of this musical restoration, with special attention to the scores for Jaws and Star Wars, Williams’s work as conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra, and a full film/music analysis of Raiders of the Lost Ark. The result is a precise, enlightening definition of Williams’s “neoclassicism” and a grounded demonstration of his lasting importance, for both his compositions and his historical role in restoring part of the Hollywood tradition. Best Special Interest Books, selected by the American Association of School Librarians Best Books for General Audiences, selected by the Public Library Reviewers

The Ashgate Research Companion to Minimalist and Postminimalist Music

The Ashgate Research Companion to Minimalist and Postminimalist Music

In recent years the music of minimalist composers such as La Monte Young, Terry Riley, Steve Reich and Philip Glass has, increasingly, become the subject of important musicological reflection, research and debate. Scholars have also been turning their attention to the work of lesser-known contemporaries such as Phill Niblock and Eliane Radigue, or to second and third generation minimalists such as John Adams, Louis Andriessen, Michael Nyman and William Duckworth, whose range of styles may undermine any sense of shared aesthetic approach but whose output is still to a large extent informed by the innovative work of their minimalist predecessors. Attempts have also been made by a number of academics to contextualise the work of composers who have moved in parallel with these developments while remaining resolutely outside its immediate environment, including such diverse figures as Karel Goeyvaerts, Robert Ashley, Arvo Pärt and Brian Eno. Theory has reflected practice in many respects, with the multimedia works of Reich and Glass encouraging interdisciplinary approaches, associations and interconnections. Minimalism’s role in culture and society has also become the subject of recent interest and debate, complementing existing scholarship, which addressed the subject from the perspective of historiography, analysis, aesthetics and philosophy. The Ashgate Research Companion to Minimalist and Postminimalist Music provides an authoritative overview of established research in this area, while also offering new and innovative approaches to the subject.

A Dictionary of Cinema Quotations from Filmmakers and Critics

Over 3400 Axioms, Criticisms, Opinions and Witticisms from 100 Years of the Cinema

A Dictionary of Cinema Quotations from Filmmakers and Critics

“The cinema isn’t a slice of life, it’s a slice of cake”—Alfred Hitchcock. “If you make a popular movie, you start to think where have I failed?”—Woody Allen. “A film is the world in an hour and a half”—Jean-Luc Godard. “I think you have to be slightly psychopathic to make movies”—David Cronenberg. This compendium contains more than 3,400 quotations from filmmakers and critics discussing their craft. About 1,850 film people are included—Buñuel, Capra, Chaplin, Disney, Fellini, Fitzgerald, Griffith, Kael, Kurasawa, Pathé, Sarris, Schwarzenegger, Spielberg, Waters and Welles among them. The quotations are arranged under 31 topics such as acting, animation, audience, budget, casting, critics, costume design, directing, locations, reviews, screenwriting, special effects and stardom. Indexing by filmmakers (or critics), by film titles and by narrow subjects provides a rich array of points of access.

100 Greatest Film Scores

100 Greatest Film Scores

This book considers the greatest film scores produced over a span of more than 80 years. Each entry includes background information about the film, biographical information about the composer, a concise analysis of the score, and a summary of the score’s impact both within the film it accompanies, but also on cinematic history.

Danny Elfman's Batman

A Film Score Guide

Danny Elfman's Batman

This resource is the most in-depth scholarly resource available on Danny Elfman. It integrates a careful study of Elfman's scoring technique with a detailed analysis of the film itself.

Film and Television Scores, 1950Ð1979

A Critical Survey by Genre

Film and Television Scores, 1950Ð1979

Hollywood film scores underwent a supersonic transformation from the 1950s through the 1970s. This genre-by-genre overview of film and television soundtrack music covers a period of tremendous artistic and commercial development in the medium. Film and television composers bypassed the classical tradition favored by earlier screen composers to experiment with jazz, rock, funk and avant-garde styles. This bold approach brought a rich variety to film and television productions that often took on a life of its own through records and CDs. From Bernard Herrmann to Ennio Morricone, the composers of the “Silver Age” changed the way movie music was made, used, and heard. The book contains more than 100 promotional film stills and soundtrack cover art images.

Robert Rodriguez

Interviews

Robert Rodriguez

Rogue filmmaker Robert Rodriguez (b. 1968) rocketed to fame with his ultra-low-budget film El Mariachi (1992). The Spanish-language action film, and the making-of book that accompanied it, were inspirational to filmmakers trying to work with the most meager of resources. Rodriguez embodies the postmodern auteur, maintaining a firm control of his projects by not only writing and producing his films, but also editing, shooting, composing, as well as working with the visual effects. He was one of the first American filmmakers to wholeheartedly adopt digital filmmaking, now the norm. Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over (2003) helped bring back 3-D to mainstream theatres. He is as comfortable making family films (the Spy Kids series) as action (Sin City) and horror films (Planet Terror). He has maintained his guerilla filmmaking approach, despite increasing budgets, choosing to work outside of Hollywood and even founding his own studio (Troublemaker Studios) in Austin, Texas. He has also arguably become the most successful Latino filmmaker. In this, the first book devoted to Rodriguez, interviews and articles from 1993 to 2010 reveal a filmmaker passionate about making films on his own terms. He addresses the subjects central to his life and work: guerilla filmmaking, the digital revolution, his family, and his disdain for Hollywood. An easy and frank subject, these portraits depict the rebel director at his most candid, forging a path for others to break free from Hollywood hegemony.

Careers in Focus

Film

Careers in Focus

Profiles jobs in film such as actors, animators, camera operators, film writers, screenwriters, stunt performers, and more.

Zbigniew Preisner's Three Colors Trilogy: Blue, White, Red

A Film Score Guide

Zbigniew Preisner's Three Colors Trilogy: Blue, White, Red

Director Krzysztof Kieslowski's Three Colors trilogy—Blue (1993), White (1993), and Red (1994)—is one of the great achievements of European film. A meditation on liberty, equality, and fraternity, these three films marked the culmination of the director's career, as well as the zenith of one of the most important creative collaborations in 20th-century cinema-between Kieslowski, scriptwriter Krzysztof Piesiewicz, and composer Zbigniew Preisner. Thanks to their close working relationship, music for the Three Colors trilogy achieves both a focal narrative and philosophical function. At times, Preisner's music advances the narrative independently of the films' other codes; at other times, it creates a metaphorical space into which the audience is invited in order to read for "deeper" messages. As the first major scholarly treatment of Preisner's music, Nicholas Reyland's Zbigniew Preisner's Three Colors Trilogy: A Film Score Guide fills an important void in film score scholarship. In this guide, Reyland analyzes the historical context of the film scores, the life of the composer, the hermeneutic and narrative role of the music within the film, and the musical scoring techniques used for the trilogy. This volume also draws on an interplay of established "classic" approaches to analyzing film music and more recent approaches in the exploration of its themes and readings. In addition, the composer's willingness to be interviewed by Reyland enhances the musicological scholarship of this book, giving the reader privileged access into the process of scoring. A significant contribution to both film studies and musicological literature, this book celebrates one of the great cinematic achievements of the last few decades.