Fight Medicine

Diagnosis and Treatment of Combat Sports Injuries for Boxing, Wrestling, and Mixed Martial Arts

Fight Medicine

Fight Medicine is the first book that explains in detail what medical professionals, fighters, trainers and managers need to know about diagnosing and treating combat sports injuries. Injured boxers, wrestlers and mixed martial artists who ignore injuries or fail to seek optimal health care often pay for it with pain, frustration and lost training time. Fighters require specialized medical care from appropriately trained medical professionals. Although there are many well-qualified physicians who take care of athletes, some may not have the specialized training needed to recognize a serious fight injury that can impact a fighter's career. Many health care providers are unfamiliar with the unique issues of fight medicine, such as hand injury, ocular injury, concussion and chronic traumatic brain injury. Dr. Kelly has packed Fight Medicine with chapter after chapter of solid information on the diagnosis and treatment of a wide array of injuries and ailments suffered by fighters, including bone, joint and soft tissue injuries; neurological and cardiac conditions; pulmonary conditions; and infectious diseases. Whether you're a doctor who wants to learn more about fight medicine or a fighter or trainer, Fight Medicine will give you the information you need to make the right call.

Cheyenne Autumn

Cheyenne Autumn

Records the struggles of the northern Cheyenne who battled the United States Cavalry in an effort to return to their Yellowstone homelands

Policies and Strategies to Combat Drugs in Europe

The Treaty on European Union, Framework for a New European Strategy to Combact Drugs?

Policies and Strategies to Combat Drugs in Europe

Mathilde van den Brink.

Health Care in America

A History

Health Care in America

In Health Care in America, historian John C. Burnham describes changes over four centuries of medicine and public health in America. Beginning with seventeenth-century concerns over personal and neighborhood illnesses, Burnham concludes with the arrival of a new epoch in American medicine and health care at the turn of the twenty-first century. From the 1600s through the 1990s, Americans turned to a variety of healers, practices, and institutions in their efforts to prevent and survive epidemics of smallpox, yellow fever, cholera, influenza, polio, and AIDS. Health care workers in all periods attended births and deaths and cared for people who had injuries, disabilities, and chronic diseases. Drawing on primary sources, classic scholarship, and a vast body of recent literature in the history of medicine and public health, Burnham finds that traditional healing, care, and medicine dominated the United States until the late nineteenth century, when antiseptic/aseptic surgery and germ theory initiated an intellectual, social, and technical transformation. He divides the age of modern medicine into several eras: physiological medicine (1910s–1930s), antibiotics (1930s–1950s), technology (1950s–1960s), environmental medicine (1970s–1980s), and, beginning around 1990, genetic medicine. The cumulating developments in each era led to today’s radically altered doctor-patient relationship and the insistent questions that swirl around the financial cost of health care. Burnham’s sweeping narrative makes sense of medical practice, medical research, and human frailties and foibles, opening the door to a new understanding of our current concerns.

Current Catalog

Current Catalog

First multi-year cumulation covers six years: 1965-70.

Life of George Bent

Written from His Letters

Life of George Bent

George Bent, the son of William Bent, one of the founders of Bent's Fort on the Arkansas near present La Junta, Colorado, and Owl Woman, a Cheyenne, began exchanging letters in 1905 with George E. Hyde of Omaha concerning life at the fort, his experiences with his Cheyenne kinsmen, and the events which finally led to the military suppression of the Indians on the southern Great Plains. This correspondence, which continued to the eve of Bent's death in 1918, is the source of the narrative here published, the narrator being Bent himself. Almost ninety years have elapsed since the day in 1930 when Mr. Hyde found it impossible to market the finished manuscript of the Bent life down to 1866. (The Depression had set in some months before.) He accordingly sold that portion of the manuscript to the Denver Public Library, retaining his working copy, which carries down to 1875. The account therefore embraces the most stirring period, not only of Bent's own life, but of life on the Plains and into the Rockies. It has never before been published. It is not often that an eyewitness of great events in the West tells his own story. But Bent's narrative, aside from the extent of its chronology (1826 to 1875), has very special significance as an inside view of Cheyenne life and action after the Sand Creek Massacre of 1864, which cost so many of the lives of Bent's friends and relatives. It is hardly probable that we shall achieve a more authentic view of what happened, as the Cheyennes, Arapahos, and Sioux saw it.

Rogue River

The Texas Anthem Series:

Rogue River

The captain was a madwoman with a scattergun. The soldiers were a whore, a surveyor's assistant, a writer, a crusty old Irishman, two murderous brothers, a criminal, and a county hunter. And the only way out of the mountains was on a frigid river that flowed toward the Missouri--a river running with blood. Texas-born Cole Anthem was the bounty hunter. He had followed an outlaw right into the middle of a major Indian uprising and a battle that turned into a slaughter. Now Cole and the other survivors of a raging Cheyenne war are taking the only chance they have: riding a woman's keelboat toward safety. But up and down the Rogue, a glory-mad chief hasn't given up. His warriors are armed and waiting--to spill the white men's blood...

Medicine, Morality, and Political Culture

Legislation on Venereal Disease in Five Northern European Countries, C.1870-c.1995

Medicine, Morality, and Political Culture

How did governments in the past act to stop the spread of venereal disease? Did legislation reflect medical opinion, and how did it treat the interests represented by women's or homosexual organisations? How can similarities and differences in national legislation be explained? In this book celebrated historian Ida Blom analyses the political culture of five welfare states -- the three social-democratic states of Scandinavia, the conservative German state, and the liberal British state -- with a view to understanding how relations between the individual citizen and the state vary. Pointing to important differences between the Scandinavian countries, the book charts the interaction of medicine and sexual morality, indicating the influence -- or lack of influence -- of medical opinion, and the impact of debates about gender, sexuality, and religion on policies intended to combat venereal disease. Ida Blom identifies the far-reaching consequences of these policies, be they fresh solutions or repeats of past political decisions, and establishes their effectiveness in hindering the spread of disease.

Cherokee Medicine Man

The Life and Work of a Modern-Day Healer

Cherokee Medicine Man

A modern medicine man portrayed through the words of the people he has helped Robert J. Conley did not set out to chronicle the life of Cherokee medicine man John Little Bear. Instead, the medicine man came to him. Little Bear asked Conley to write down his story, to reveal to the world ?what Indian medicine is really about.” For Little Bear, as for the Cherokee ancestors who brought their traditions over the Trail of Tears to Indian Territory, the medicine is about helping people. Visitors from neighboring states and Mexico come to him, each one seeking help for a different kind of problem. Each seeker's story is presented here exactly as it was told to Conley. Little Bear has cured problems involving health, relationships, and money by uncovering the source of the problem rather than simply treating the symptoms. Whereas mainstream medicine and counseling have failed his patients, Little Bear's healing practices have proven beneficial time and again.