Enemy at the Gates

The Battle for Stalingrad

Enemy at the Gates

A New York Times bestseller that brings to life one of the bloodiest battles of World War II—and the beginning of the end of the Third Reich. On August 5, 1942, giant pillars of dust rose over the Russian steppe, marking the advance of the 6th Army, an elite German combat unit dispatched by Hitler to capture the industrial city of Stalingrad and press on to the oil fields of Azerbaijan. The Germans were supremely confident; in three years, they had not suffered a single defeat.The Luftwaffe had already bombed the city into ruins. German soldiers hoped to complete their mission and be home in time for Christmas. The siege of Stalingrad lasted five months, one week, and three days. Nearly two million men and women died, and the 6th Army was completely destroyed. Considered by many historians to be the turning point of World War II in Europe, the Soviet Army’s victory foreshadowed Hitler’s downfall and the rise of a communist superpower. Bestselling author William Craig spent five years researching this epic clash of military titans, traveling to three continents in order to review documents and interview hundreds of survivors. Enemy at the Gates is the enthralling result: the definitive account of one of the most important battles in world history. It became a New York Times bestseller and was also the inspiration for the 2001 film of the same name, starring Joseph Fiennes and Jude Law.

History in the Media

Film and Television

History in the Media

A resource on the depiction of historical events in film, on television, and on the Internet combines the latest scholarship with reviews of specific works.

The World War II Chronicles

The Fall of Japan and Enemy at the Gates

The World War II Chronicles

A “virtually faultless” account of the final weeks of World War II in the Pacific and the definitive history of the battle for Stalingrad together in one volume (The New York Times Book Review). Author William Craig traveled to three different continents, reviewed thousands of documents, and interviewed hundreds of survivors to write these New York Times–bestselling histories, bringing the Eastern Front and the Pacific Theater of World War II to vivid life. The Fall of Japan masterfully recounts the dramatic events that brought an end to the Pacific War and forced a once-mighty nation to surrender unconditionally. From the ferocious fighting on Okinawa to the all-but-impossible mission to drop the second atom bomb, and from Franklin D. Roosevelt’s White House to the Tokyo bunker where tearful Japanese leaders first told the emperor the war was lost, Craig draws on Japanese and American perspectives to capture the pivotal events of these climactic weeks with spellbinding authority. Enemy at the Gates chronicles the bloodiest battle of the war and the beginning of the end for the Third Reich. On August 5, 1942, giant pillars of dust rose over the Russian steppe, marking the advance of Hitler’s 6th Army. The Germans were supremely confident; in three years, they had not suffered a single defeat. The siege of Stalingrad lasted five months, one week, and three days. Nearly two million men and women died, and the 6th Army was completely destroyed. The Soviet victory foreshadowed Nazi Germany’s downfall and the rise of a communist superpower. Heralded by Cornelius Ryan, author of The Longest Day, as “the best single work on the epic battle of Stalingrad,” Enemy at the Gates was the inspiration for the 2001 film of the same name, starring Joseph Fiennes and Jude Law.

Reader's Guide to Military History

Reader's Guide to Military History

This book contains some 600 entries on a range of topics from ancient Chinese warfare to late 20th-century intervention operations. Designed for a wide variety of users, it encompasses general reviews of aspects of military organization and science, as well as specific wars and conflicts. The book examines naval and air warfare, as well as significant individuals, including commanders, theorists, and war leaders. Each entry includes a listing of additional publications on the topic, accompanied by an article discussing these publications with reference to their particular emphases, strengths, and limitations.

Notes of a Russian Sniper

Notes of a Russian Sniper

'As a sniper, I've killed more than a few Nazis. I have a passion for observing enemy behaviour. You watch a Nazi officer come out of a bunker, acting all high and mighty, ordering his soldiers every which way, and putting on an air of authority. The officer hasn't got the slightest idea that he only has seconds to live.' Vassili Zaitsev's account of the hell that was Stalingrad is moving and harrowing. This was a battle to the death - fighting street by street, brick by brick, living like rats in a desperate struggle to survive. Here, the rules of war were discarded and a psychological war was being waged. In this environment, the sniper was king - an unseen enemy who frayed the nerves of brutalised soldiers. Zaitsev volunteered to fight at Stalingrad in 1942. His superiors recognized quickly his talent, and made him a sniper. He adapted his hunting skills to the ruins of the city, watching his prey with nerves of steel. In his first 10 days, Zaitsev killed 40 Germans. He achieved at least 225 kills and the tactics he developed are still being studied. Zaitsev was used a symbol of Russian resistance against the Nazis. His exploits, including a famous 'duel' with a Nazi sniper, remain the stuff of legend. His account is absorbing to anyone interested in World War II and seeing how one person could survive in the most extreme of conditions.

Social Studies for Secondary Schools

Teaching to Learn, Learning to Teach

Social Studies for Secondary Schools

This popular text advocates an inquiry and activity-based view of social studies teaching that respects the points of view of students and teachers. Based in practice and experience, it offers systematic support and open, honest advice for new teachers, is conversational not pedantic, and provides lots of examples. While the structure and most of the topics remain largely the same as before, this Third Edition presents new lesson ideas in every chapter especially designed to help new teachers to address learning standards, to work in inclusive settings, and to promote literacy and the use of technology in social studies classrooms puts a heavier focus on what is important to know and why includes new essays on the politics of social studies education responds to opponents of project- or activity-based social studies instruction and multicultural education with a sharpened defense of both of these approaches throughout the book Intended as a text for undergraduate and graduate pre-service social studies methods courses, this text is also useful for in-service training programs, as a reference for new social studies teachers, and as a resource for experienced social studies educators who are engaged in rethinking their teaching practice.

100 First Pages

100 First Pages

This book is called 100 First Pages because that's what it is. Each page in the book is 'supposed' to be the first page of a novel. Next to that page, on the left, are my comments about how the novel might go, along with some of my personal thoughts on the 'subject'. That's the best part, because it is a mini-encyclopedia, almanac, journal and, to some extent, a blog. The book covers a large array of topics and genres. When you buy the book and read it, you can go to my website listed in the back and vote for your favorite BEGINNING. You can also suggest a title for the book. I promise that I will write the novel which receives the most votes for publication AND if you are the person who suggests the Best Title, i.e. the one I will use, you will get a cover credit, an entire page inside to write anything you like and one dollar for every copy sold! Check out the preview and give it a try.

The Cold War Thrillers

The Strasbourg Legacy and The Tashkent Crisis

The Cold War Thrillers

Two explosive novels set in the perilous days when the world stood on the brink of chaos—from the New York Times–bestselling author of Enemy at the Gates. For almost fifty years after World War II, the United States and the Soviet Union played a dangerous game in the shadows. And from those shadows would emerge unsung heroes who would fight for freedom . . . The Strasbourg Legacy: Investigating the possible Soviet theft of US munitions, CIA agent Matt Corcoran hears rumors that German communists and Aryan terrorists are conspiring to assassinate political leaders. But far more ominous is the underground cadre of surviving Nazi officers bent on starting the Fourth Reich . . . The Tashkent Crisis: As tensions rise between the superpowers, the Soviets deliver an ultimatum: surrender unconditionally or a devastating secret weapon will kill millions of Americans. Now a Special Forces team led by Col. Joe Safcek must infiltrate a secret Soviet base and destroy the mystery weapon. But the closer they get, the more Safcek realizes it may already be too late . . . With these “furious-paced” novels of “timeclock suspense” William Craig takes readers back to a time when the Cold War could have started burning with a single spark (Kirkus Reviews).

The Best of Slashnot, 2002 - 2005

The Best of Slashnot, 2002 - 2005

The Best of SlashNOT is a collection of short satirical stories ranging from true observations of humorous events to hilarious absurdity that any true geek will love. The Best of SlashNOT takes the most humorous stories from posted on SlashNOT.com and presents them in the order that the SlashNOT community ranked them. You won't find Geek humor funnier or more laser focused on technology than The Best of SlashNOT. Articles include all the community favorites, like: Einstein returns from grave to bitch-slap dark matter Quaker: The non-violent first person shooter Microsoft seeking two letters cooler than X and P Science reverts to mad science Universe even darker and scarier than previously thought Google arrested while dumping body Gates and Torvalds to finally settle this thing Schrodinger arrested on cruelty, weapons charges IBM developing Artificial Stupidity Microsoft releases Windows XP Homeless edition SlashNOT is a satirical website that parodies Slashnot.com, the ridiculously popular open-source advocacy website. In addition to the stories and comments from SlashNOT.com, The Best of SlashNOT includes exclusive commentary and insights from the author and editor of the website.