Eight Little Piggies

Reflections in Natural History

Eight Little Piggies

No one illuminates the wonderful workings of the natural world as perceptively and enjoyably as Stephen Jay Gould. In this volume of reflections on biology, history and culture, Gould addresses the burning issues of ecological crisis and contemporary species extinctions as well as giving us fascinating insights into evolution - such as the fact that the first land vertebrates had up to eight toes on each foot, and that the ichthyosaur had a very significant kink in its tail.

Creative Themes for Every Day, Grades Preschool - K

Creative Themes for Every Day, Grades Preschool - K

Creative Themes for Every Day is the perfect compilation of self-directed, hands-on educational resources that reinforce all aspects of classroom learning. Aligning to NAEYC program standards, this book focuses on movement, art, cognitive skills, and dramatic play that will help build a strong foundation for kindergarten and beyond. Its 160 pages include hundreds of hands-on activities and themed learning experiences for school and home.

Habitat of Grace

Biology, Christianity and the Global Environmental Crisis

Habitat of Grace

In 1990 the Worldwatch Institute in Washington estimated that humankind had forty years to make the transition to an environmentally stable society. If we have not succeeded by then, it concluded, environmental deterioration and economic decline are likley to be feeding on each other, pulling us into a downward spiral of social disintegration. Worldwatch is no millenarian cult, but a sober and careful organisation whose annual summaries of world affairs have become the planet's unofficial environmental health reports. Its pronouncements are cautiously worded, influential and worth attnedning to, even if the timing is hard to predict. This book uses the issues raised in these reports to look at biology, the envrinomental crisis and theological response to it all by developing a new theology of creation. Based on her scientific background in the bilogical sciences, King brings together biology and theology. It covers sciecne, religion and environment, human nature and develops a theology of creation. The author teaches at the University of Waikato in New Zealand.

The Mismeasure of Man (Revised and Expanded)

The Mismeasure of Man (Revised and Expanded)

The definitive refutation to the argument of The Bell Curve. When published in 1981, The Mismeasure of Man was immediately hailed as a masterwork, the ringing answer to those who would classify people, rank them according to their supposed genetic gifts and limits. And yet the idea of innate limits—of biology as destiny—dies hard, as witness the attention devoted to The Bell Curve, whose arguments are here so effectively anticipated and thoroughly undermined by Stephen Jay Gould. In this edition Dr. Gould has written a substantial new introduction telling how and why he wrote the book and tracing the subsequent history of the controversy on innateness right through The Bell Curve. Further, he has added five essays on questions of The Bell Curve in particular and on race, racism, and biological determinism in general. These additions strengthen the book's claim to be, as Leo J. Kamin of Princeton University has said, "a major contribution toward deflating pseudo-biological 'explanations' of our present social woes."

A Short History of Nearly Everything

A Short History of Nearly Everything

Bill Bryson describes himself as a reluctant traveller, but even when he stays safely at home he can't contain his curiosity about the world around him. A Short History of Nearly Everything is his quest to understand everything that has happened from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization - how we got from there, being nothing at all, to here, being us. Bill Bryson's challenge is to take subjects that normally bore the pants off most of us, like geology, chemistry and particle physics, and see if there isn't some way to render them comprehensible to people who have never thought they could be interested in science. The ultimate eye-opening journey through time and space, A Short History of Nearly Everything is the biggest-selling popular science book of the 21st century, and reveals the world in a way most of us have never seen it before.

Hidden Assets

Harnessing the Power of Informal Networks

Hidden Assets

Provides insights in cutting-edge models to put to practical use in order to increase an organaization's intellectual capital and new knowledge. Softcover version of the original that published in August 2004. Testimonials "Finally, a real breakthrough in management theory and philosophy. In Hidden Assets Ehin breaks the mold of current management thinking and presents a comprehensive and practical framework specifically designed for the knowledge economy." (Chris Tomecek, President, Bank of New York Separate Accounts Division) "Where was all of this when I needed it??? Over 40 years of management knowledge, experience, and tools packed into one book! What an incredible jump-start into a management career found in one quick-read work!" (Peter F. Gerity, Ph.D., Vice President for Academic Affairs, New Mexico Tech)

Nature and Ideology

Natural Garden Design in the Twentieth Century

Nature and Ideology

These ideas of natural garden design helped shape much of twentieth-century landscape architecture in both the United States and Europe, and the ideologies underlying various concepts of natural gardens show how political, economic, and social developments influenced design programs and decisions.

The Flamingo's Smile: Reflections in Natural History

The Flamingo's Smile: Reflections in Natural History

"Gould himself is a rare and wonderful animal—a member of the endangered species known as the ruby-throated polymath. . . . [He] is a leading theorist on large-scale patterns in evolution . . . [and] one of the sharpest and most humane thinkers in the sciences." --David Quammen, New York Times Book Review

Hen's Teeth and Horse's Toes: Further Reflections in Natural History

Hen's Teeth and Horse's Toes: Further Reflections in Natural History

"Lively and fascinating. . . . [Gould] writes beautifully about science and the wonders of nature."—Tracy Kidder Over a century after Darwin published the Origin of Species, Darwinian theory is in a "vibrantly healthy state," writes Stephen Jay Gould, its most engaging and illuminating exponent. Exploring the "peculiar and mysterious particulars of nature," Gould introduces the reader to some of the many and wonderful manifestations of evolutionary biology.