Ecology of Central European Non-Forest Vegetation: Coastal to Alpine, Natural to Man-Made Habitats

Vegetation Ecology of Central Europe

Ecology of Central European Non-Forest Vegetation: Coastal to Alpine, Natural to Man-Made Habitats

This handbook in two volumes synthesises our knowledge about the ecology of Central Europe’s plant cover with its 7000-yr history of human impact, covering Germany, Poland, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Austria, Czech Republic and Slovakia. Based on a thorough literature review with 5500 cited references and nearly 1000 figures and tables, the two books review in 26 chapters all major natural and man-made vegetation types with their climatic and edaphic influences, the structure and dynamics of their communities, the ecophysiology of important plant species, and key aspects of ecosystem functioning. Volume I deals with forests and scrub vegetation and analyses the ecology of Central Europe’s tree flora, whilst Volume II is dedicated to the non-forest vegetation covering mires, grasslands, heaths, alpine habitats and urban vegetation. The consequences of over-use, pollution and recent climate change over the last century are explored and conservation issues addressed.

Plant Biogeography and Vegetation of High Mountains of Central and South-West Asia

Plant Biogeography and Vegetation of High Mountains of Central and South-West Asia

This book presents an overview study about plant biogeography and vegetation of the high mountains of Central and South-West Asia, by a group of specialists familiar with its area and plant growth and ecology. This book discusses its ecological and evolutionary drivers and also its conservation priorities. Central and South-West Asia is one of the most diverse areas in the northern hemisphere and several biodiversity hotspots are concentrated in this region. Most of the biodiversity hotspots are associated with high mountain ranges of the region. Moreover, these mountains have been immigration corridors for the Central Asian flora to reach Euro-Siberian and Mediterranean regions. Despite its importance, there is no overview publication to present the plant biogeography and vegetation of these mountains and most of the publications are local or rather imprecise

Animals' Influence on the Landscape and Ecological Importance

Natives, Newcomers, Homecomers

Animals' Influence on the Landscape and Ecological Importance

In its first English-language edition, this book introduces the many-faceted interactions of animal populations with their habitats. From soil fauna, ants and termites to small and large herbivores, burrowing mammals and birds, the author presents a comprehensive analysis of animals and ecosystems that is as broad and varied as all nature. Chapter 2 addresses the functional role of animals in landscape ecosystems, emphasizing fluxes of energy and matter within and between ecosystems, and the effects of animals on qualitative and structural habitat change. Discussion includes chapters on the role of animal population density and the impacts of native herbivores on vegetation and habitats from the tropics to the polar regions. Cyclic mass outbreaks of species such as the larch bud moth in Switzerland, the mountain pine beetle and the African red-billed weaver bird are described and analyzed. Other chapters discuss Zoochory – the dispersal of seeds by ants, mammals and birds – and the influence of burrowing animals on soil development and geomorphology. Consideration extends to the impact of feral domestic animals. Chapter 5 focuses on problems resulting from introduction of alien animals and from re-introduction of animal species to their original habitats, discusses the effects on ecosystems of burrowing, digging and trampling by animals. The author also addresses keystone species such as kangaroo rats, termites and beavers. Chapter 6 addresses the role of animals in landscape management and nature conservation, with chapters on the impact of newcomer species such as animals introduced into Australia, New Zealand and Europe, and the consequences of reintroduction of species to original habitat. It also discusses the carrying capacity of natural habit, public attitudes toward conversation and more. The final section ponders the effects of climate on interactions between animals and their habitats.

Invasiveness Ranking System for Non-native Plants of Alaska

Invasiveness Ranking System for Non-native Plants of Alaska

Describes a ranking system used to evaluate the potential invasiveness and impacts of 113 non-native plants to natural areas in Alaska. Species are ranked by a series of questions in four broad categories: ecosystem impacts, biological attributes, distribution, and control measures. Also included is a climate screening procedure to evaluate the potential for establishment in three ecogeographic regions of Alaska [Juneau, Fairbanks, Nome].

Our Vanishing Wilderness

Our Vanishing Wilderness

A beautifully illustrated survey of plant and animal life in America, demonstrating the balance of nature and man's disruption of normal chains

Official Meeting Program

Official Meeting Program