Early Colonial Trade and Navigation Between Mexico and Peru

A history of trade, from establishment to maturity, between Mexico and Peru in the 16th century.

Early Colonial Trade and Navigation Between Mexico and Peru

A history of trade, from establishment to maturity, between Mexico and Peru in the 16th century.

The Political Economy of Merchant Empires

Certainly Spain retained practically nothing of the silver that passed through its
borders . ... According to Woodrow Borah , Early Colonial Trade and Navigation
between Mexico and Peru ( Berkeley , 1954 ) , 116 – 27 , the Peru - Philippines ...

The Political Economy of Merchant Empires

This book focuses on why Europe became the dominant economic force in global trade between 1450 and 1750.

The Cambridge Economic History of Latin America Volume 1 The Colonial Era and the Short Nineteenth Century

how the interactions between the internal economy and trade conditioned
longrun regional growth patterns . ... Mining Industry in the 18th Century , ” in Nils
Jacobsen and Hans Jürgen Puhle , eds . , The Economies of Mexico and Peru
During the Late Colonial Period ... Regional trade was initially explored by
Woodrow Borah , Early Colonial Trade and Navigation between Mexico and Peru
( Berkeley ...

The Cambridge Economic History of Latin America  Volume 1  The Colonial Era and the Short Nineteenth Century

An indispensable reference work for anyone interested in Latin America's economic development.

European and Non European Societies 1450 1800

Yáñez had extensive dealings with other merchants and a number of partners,
most of whom were from northern Spain like ... See Borah, Early Colonial Trade
and Navigation between Mexico and Peru (Berkeley, 1954), for the development
of ...

European and Non European Societies  1450 1800

First published in 1997, this volume looks at the process of European expansion which brought into contact societies and cultures across the world which had been initially alien to one another. Conflict was one aspect of this interaction, but accommodation, mutual adaptation, and institutional and behavioural synthesis were also present though often biased in favour of European norms. The intent of this book is to avoid treating ’colonization’, ’dominance’ and exploitation’ as the only focuses of attention. The second volume focuses on the Americas, and uses the topics of religion, class, gender, and race as its points of entry.

Empires of the Atlantic World

Eduardo Arcila Farías, Comercio entre Venezuela y Mexico en los siglos XVII y
XVIII (Mexico City, 1950), pp. 52-3. Woodrow Borah, Early Colonial Trade and
Navigation between Mexico and Peru (Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1954).

Empires of the Atlantic World

Compares the empires built by Spain and Britain in the Americas, from Columbus's arrival in the New World to the end of Spanish colonial rule in the early nineteenth century.

Africans in Colonial Mexico

Baja peninsula) involved 700 persons, of which the descendants of Africans
accounted for 300. ... Woodrow Borah, Early Colonial Trade and Navigation
between Mexico and Peru (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1954), 23;
Lolita ...

Africans in Colonial Mexico

Bennett has gone to the secular and ecclesiastical court records and teased out much new information about the lives of slaves and free blacks, the ways in which their lives were regulated by the government and the Church, the impact upon them of the Inquisition, their legal status in marriage, and their rights and obligations as Christian subjects."--BOOK JACKET.

Mexico

Blom, Frans F. The Conquest of Yucatán. Boston, 1936. Bolton, Herbert E.
Coronado on the Turquoise Trail: Knight of Pueblos and Plains. Albuquerque,
1949. Borah, Woodrow.Early Colonial Trade and Navigation between Mexico
and Peru.

Mexico

This book is a skillful synthesis of Mexico's complex and colorful history from pre-Columbian times to the present. Utilizing his many years of research and teaching as well as his personal experience in Mexico, the author incorporates recent archaeological evidence, posits fresh interpretations, and analyzes such current problems as foreign debt, dependency on petroleum exports, and providing education and employment for an expanding population. Combining political events and social history in a smooth narrative, the book describes events, places, and individuals, the daily life of peasants and urban workers, and touches on cultural topics, including architecture, art, literature, and music. As a special feature, each chapter contains excerpts from contemporary letters, books, decrees, or poems, firsthand accounts that lend historical flavor to the discussion of each era. Mexico has an exciting history: several Indian civilizations; the Spanish conquest; three colonial centuries, during which there was a blending of Old World and New World cultures; a decade of wars for independence; the struggle of the young republic; wars with the United States and France; confrontation between the Indian president, Juárez, and the Austrian born emperor, Maximilian; a long dictatorship under Diaz; the Great Revolution that destroyed debt peonage, confiscated Church property, and reduced foreign economic power; and the recent drive to modernize through industrialization. Mexico: A History will be an excellent college-level textbook and good reading for the thousands of Americans who have visited Mexico and those who hope to visit.

Transatlantic Ties in the Spanish Empire

In English Ways: The Movement of Societies and the Transferral of English Local
Law and Custom to Massachusetts Bay ... "Spanish Society in Mexico City After
the Conquest. ... Early Colonial Trade and Navigation Between Mexico and Peru.

Transatlantic Ties in the Spanish Empire

Ida Altman is Professor of History at the University of New Orleans. Her book Emigrants and Society: Extremadura and Spanish America in the Sixteenth Century received the 1990 Herbert E. Bolton Prize of the Conference on Latin American History. ---------- Between 1560 and 1620, a thousand or more people left the town of Brihuega in Spain to migrate to New Spain (now Mexico), where nearly all of them settled in Puebla de los Angeles, New Spain's second most important city. A medium-sized community of about four thousand people, Brihuega had been a center of textile production since the Middle Ages, but in the latter part of the sixteenth century its industry was in decline--a circumstance that induced a significant number of its townspeople to emigrate to Puebla, where conditions for textile manufacturing seemed ideal. The immigrants from Brihuega played a crucial role in making Puebla the leading textile producer in New Spain, and they were otherwise active in the city's commercial-industrial sector as well. Although some immigrants penetrated the higher circles of poblano society and politics, for the most part they remained close to their entrepreneurial and artisanal origins. Closely associated through business, kinship, marital, and compadrazgo ties, and in residential patterns, the Brihuega immigrants in Puebla constituted a coherent and visible community. This book uses the experiences and activities of the immigrants as a basis for analyzing society in Brihuega and Puebla, making direct comparisons between the two cities by examining such topics as mobility and settlement; politics and public life; economic activity; religious life; social relations; and marriage, family, and kinship. In tracing the socioeconomic, cultural, and institutional patterns of a town in Spain and a city in New Spain--in all their connections, continuities, and discontinuities--the book offers a new basis for understanding the process and implications of the transference of these patterns within the early modern Hispanic world. ---------- "This superb case study of migration from a Spanish town to an emerging community in New Spain over a 60-year period has broad applicability and implications for the study of transatlantic migration in the early modern period." --John Kicza, Washington State University "[The book] exposes and illuminates, as no other study that I know of, the process by which people, institutions, and cultural norms traveled from the Old World to the New during the early modern period, and how they adapted to the American milieu. This is a major accomplishment. And Altman delivers it in elegant prose and and engaging style."--International Migration Review "Ida Altman has written a book that both probes deeply the significance of tying together Iberian and American domains under a common Crown government and brilliantly demonstrates how the comparative history of the first global age ought to be approached. . . . Throughout well-organized and well-written chapters on economic, political, religious, and social life, the book underlines its methodological message: in order to understand the nature and impact of migration, researchers must focus on locality."--Comparative Studies in Society and History "With this monograph, Ida Altman completes her innovative conspectus of postconquest culture in specific regions of sixteenth-century Spain and New Spain, begun with her Emigrants and Society. . . . [Transatlantic Ties in the Spanish Empire] is ground level social history based on careful exploitation of manuscript materials, notably in repositories of Puebla and Mexico City, Seville, and Madrid."--American Historical Review "[Transatlantic Ties in the Spanish Empire] should be on the book-shelves of every historian of early modern times."The Journal of European Economic History

Pirates of New Spain 1575 1742

Being an Account of a Remarkable Enterprize, begun in the Year 1719, chiefly to
cruise on the Spaniards in the great South Ocean. London, 1728 Borah,
Woodrow. Early Colonial Trade and Navigation Between Mexico and Peru.

Pirates of New Spain  1575 1742

Captivating, well-documented study focuses on piracy among Spain's Pacific coast colonies, ranging from Panama to points north. Colorful narrative traces exploits of Elizabethan pirates, Dutch raiders, mercenary buccaneers, and English privateers and smugglers.