Dying City

Dying City

A dissection of the impact on society of the war in Iraq When one man goes to war he leaves the city, his wife and brother. A year later only the wife and brother remain. Christopher Shinn's new play asks what happens when people and events apparently thousands of miles away affect the heart and soul of a city.'Christopher Shinn's clever, intricately calculated and quietly moving new play" Daily Telegraph'Subtle, insinuating, beautifully written new play' Whatsonstage'an impressive analysis of the collective American psyche rooted in details of real family life' Guardian

The Dying City

Postwar New York and the Ideology of Fear

The Dying City

In this eye-opening cultural history, Brian Tochterman examines competing narratives that shaped post–World War II New York City. As a sense of crisis rose in American cities during the 1960s and 1970s, a period defined by suburban growth and deindustrialization, no city was viewed as in its death throes more than New York. Feeding this narrative of the dying city was a wide range of representations in film, literature, and the popular press--representations that ironically would not have been produced if not for a city full of productive possibilities as well as challenges. Tochterman reveals how elite culture producers, planners and theorists, and elected officials drew on and perpetuated the fear of death to press for a new urban vision. It was this narrative of New York as the dying city, Tochterman argues, that contributed to a burgeoning and broad anti-urban political culture hostile to state intervention on behalf of cities and citizens. Ultimately, the author shows that New York's decline--and the decline of American cities in general--was in part a self-fulfilling prophecy bolstered by urban fear and the new political culture nourished by it.

Bayani #3: Bayani and the Dying City

Bayani #3: Bayani and the Dying City

An Amazing Adventure Story For All Ages to Enjoy! Bayani, a boy of 11, is desperately trying to care for his sick father (a fisherman) and keep food on the table for his small family. Unfortunately, the sun has been shining down on the islands for the last month and night refuses to fall. The land is growing parched from the constant heat and the fish are moving further and further away from shore. During this disaster, the rain god, Pati', recruits Bayani to undertake a daring quest to rescue the nine kidnapped daughters of Lady Moon from the horrible monsters of lore. Bayani embarks on this great adventure with his friend, Tala, and using their wits, they hope to defeat one hideous creature after another in their quest to rescue each of the Moon's daughters and save their village. THIS ISSUE: The city of Antipolo has a Dying problem. Or rather, an UNDEAD problem! Three vampiric Aswang prowl the streets, causing a citywide panic as more and more children disappear. Can Bayani and Tala rescue Lil Drigo before he becomes just another pint-sized victim? Find out in the next exciting Bayani adventure for all ages to enjoy. “Travis, Grant, and company have created a vibrant world populated with compelling characters and unique creatures...this is the sort of great storytelling we don’t get enough of in mainstream comics.” - Andy Lanning (MARVEL’s Guardian of the Galaxy) “A wild ride through Filipino folklore that delivers legendary fun!” - Greg Wright (Author - Wild Bullets, Monstrous) A Caliber Comic release.

Bushwhackers 04: The Dying Town

Bushwhackers 04: The Dying Town

During the Civil War, they sought justice outside of the law, paying back every Yankee raid with one of their own. No man could stop them. No woman could resist them. And no Yankee stood a chance when Win and Joe Coulter rode into town. All Win Coulter wanted was a nice hand of poker. But his hand was hotter than the Devil’s coffee mug, and he ended up winning the deed to a Belle Springs saloon named the Desert Flower. Now Win and his brother, Joe, have a place to drink for free. But Belle Springs is run by a sheriff as crooked as an old man’s spine. He runs his own watering hole, and he doesn’t cotton to competition. So it looks like the Bushwhackers will have to ante up a special “sheriff’s tax” or get out of town. Yeah, right.

Politics and Pasta

How I Prosecuted Mobsters, Rebuilt a Dying City, Dined with Sinatra, Spent Five Years in a Federally Funded Gated Community, and Lived to Tell the Tale

Politics and Pasta

The story behind the podcast Crimetown, as told by the notorious Buddy Cianci himself. An election is a war and "to the victor belongs the spoils." That’s the real democratic process. After all, you'll never see a victorious politician tell his supporters, "I want to thank all of you who worked so hard for my election. However, in the interest of good government, I've decided to give all the jobs to those people who voted against me." This belief became Buddy Cianci’s mantra. Following his own rules, Cianci spent almost three decades as mayor of Providence, RI... before leaving for an enforced vacation in a federally funded gated community. Providence was a dying industrial city when he first took office, but he helped turn it into one of the most desirable places to live in America. He did it by playing the game of hardball politics as well as it has ever been played, living up to his favorite Sinatra lyric "I did it my way"—because that's the only way a mayor can run a city. If you want to know the truth about how politics is played, you picked the right book. This is the behind-the-locked-door story of how politics in America really works. Here is a man who has been called many things: "America's Most Innovative Mayor," a "colorful character," and a convicted felon. But no one has ever called him shy. Here, he serves it all up.

Urbantasm

Book One: the Dying City

Urbantasm


Windy City Dying

Windy City Dying

Marti MacAlister, Eleanor Taylor Bland's popular African-American heroine, is forced to confront some extremely personal demons from long ago-her husband Johnny MacAlister is long-buried, but now someone from Johnny's past is back, looking for him, and Marti fears she knows who it might be. In the meantime, her work as a suburban Chicago homicide detective has taken her back in time in another way, to a group of children she once counseled, each now four years older and with four more year's worth of problems. There's LaShawna, now seventeen and with her own four-year-old daughter; Padgett, all grown up at twelve but still living with his alcoholic mother; and then Jose, fifteen, who's in the most trouble of them all. He's been accused of murder, but the Jose that Marti remembers could not have committed such a terrible crime. Her first step is to find out what could have happened in the past four years to lead Jose to such a desperate act, and she hopes her second step will be to prove his innocence. It won't be easy, though; just what's going on with this tight group of kids, and how does it relate to the increasingly foreboding sense of doom Marti gets about the mystery man who's nosing around the remnants of her distant past? She's not sure, but she knows she must figure it all out, and soon, before another of the children, or even Marti herself, falls into grave danger. Windy City Dying is another taut, absorbing read from one of the masters of mystery fiction.