The Doctor Who Programme Guide

The Doctor Who Programme Guide

The Doctor Who Programme Guide is the complete guide to every Doctor Who story shown on television. The stories are listed in order of broadcasting, starting with the first episode broadcast in 1963. Each entry includes the storyline, the cast list, and the names of the producer, script editor, writer and director, and the details of novelizations, video and audio cassette releases. This indispensable guide first appeared over twenty years ago, and immediately established itself as the single, most important reference work about Doctor Who. "THE bible to an entire generation of [Doctor Who] fans on both sides of the Atlantic." -Andrew Pixley, Celestial Toyroom "A real treat for Doctor Who buffs." -David McDonnell, Starlog "It sits invaluably upon every fan's bookshelf and is a constant source of reference." -Gary Russell, Doctor Who Monthly "A remarkable work of...dedicated scholarship." -Barry Letts, Producer, Doctor Who

A Critical History of Doctor Who on Television

A Critical History of Doctor Who on Television

Since its inception in November 1963, the British science fiction television series Doctor Who has exerted an enormous impact on the world of science fiction (over 1,500 books have been written about the show). The series follows the adventures of a mysterious “Time Lord” from the distant planet Gallifrey who travels through time and space to fight evil and injustice. Along the way, he has visited Rome under the rule of Nero, played backgammon with Kublai Khan, and participated in the mythic gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Predating the Star Trek phenomenon by three years, Doctor Who seriously dealt with continuing characters, adult genre principles and futuristic philosophies. Critical and historical examinations of the ideas, philosophies, conceits and morals put forth in the Doctor Who series, which ran for 26 seasons and 159 episodes, are provided here. Also analyzed are thematic concepts, genre antecedents, the overall cinematography and the special effects of the long-running cult favorite. The various incarnations of Doctor Who, including television, stage, film, radio, and spin-offs are discussed. In addition, the book provides an extensive listing of print, Internet, and fan club resources for Doctor Who.

Terminus (Fringe Worlds #1)

Terminus (Fringe Worlds #1)

Master Sergeant Gant Maker was a highly-decorated and well-respected Marine - until his last mission left him as the sole survivor of an encounter with a vicious race called the Vacra. Served up as a scapegoat and drummed out of the military, he has since lived a life of seclusion with only an adopted alien as a companion. Now the Vacra have returned. As the only person to have ever faced them and survived, Maker is reinstated in the Corps and given the onerous task of finding this enemy on a world located at the edge of known space. Assisting him is an unlikely band of military rejects, including a blind sharpshooter, an unstable psychic, and a genetically-engineered killing machine who refuses to fight. Given that the Vacra have superior weapons and technology, Maker recognizes that his team is at a distinct disadvantage. But Marines are nothing if not resourceful, and Maker has an audacious plan that just may level the playing field – if it doesn’t get them all killed.

Gerald Odonis, Doctor Moralis and Franciscan Minister General

Studies in Honour of L. M. de Rijk

Gerald Odonis, Doctor Moralis and Franciscan Minister General

Famous for his role as Minister General of the Franciscan Order after the flight of Michael of Cesena and company, Gerald Odonis (ca. 1285-1348) has in recent years attracted attention for his scholarly work. At an increasing pace, studies of specific areas of Odonis thought reveal another side to the man often portrayed as Pope John XXII s creature: a philosopher and theologian who held unique, often controversial positions and defended them with zeal and integrity, whose impact extended beyond the religious and chronological confines of medieval Christendom. Building on the recent scholarship of Bonnie Kent, Christian Trottmann, and especially L.M. de Rijk, this volume gathers together studies by other specialists on Odonis, covering his ideas in economics, logic, metaphysics, ethics, natural philosophy, theology, and politics in works written over the entire span of his career. Contributors are Paul J.J.M. Bakker, Sander W. de Boer, Stephen F. Brown, Giovanni Ceccarelli, William Duba, Roberto Lambertini, Sylvain Piron, Camarin Porter, Chris Schabel, and Joke Spruyt.

A History and Critical Analysis of Blake’s 7, the 1978–1981 British Television Space Adventure

A History and Critical Analysis of Blake’s 7, the 1978–1981 British Television Space Adventure

Blake’s 7, Terry Nation’s science fiction tale of cosmic freedom fighters, became a hit series in Great Britain when it premiered in 1978. Eight years later, the show quickly became a cult program in America. A dramatization of futuristic outlaw heroes who defend the innocent from both alien and human conquering forces, the series might better be said to be equal parts Robin Hood and The Magnificent Seven. The series defied traditional genre elements of science fiction television, and developed the concept of the continual “story arc” years before such shows as Babylon 5 and Deep Space Nine. This book provides a critical history and episode guide for Blake’s 7, including commentaries for all 52 episodes. Also included are analytical essays on the show, dealing with such topics as themes, imagery and story arc; a consideration of the series as a futuristic Robin Hood myth; cinematography and visual effects; and an overview of Blake’s 7 in books, comics and videos. A detailed appendix lists the genre conventions found in the series. The author also includes information about Blake’s 7 fan clubs and Internet sites.

A Doctor in the XIVth Army

A Doctor in the XIVth Army

Charles Evans records his passage from idyllic youth, fresh from Oxford in 1939, into the harsh reality of a junior doctor in Burma. Beautifully written and elegantly vivid, his diaries illuminate the progress of this ugly campaign while his post-war life saw ground-breaking work as a mountaineer, eventually rewarded by a knighthood.

A treatise of Master Hervaeus Natalis (d. 1323), the doctor perspicacissimus, on second intentions

A treatise of Master Hervaeus Natalis (d. 1323), the doctor perspicacissimus, on second intentions

As almost everyone knows, the notion of intentionality comes from the Middle Ages. What is less known is that Hervaeus Natalis, OP (d. 1323) was the first one explicitly to consider it as such. Even less known is the fact that he came to it not immediately from the Aristotelian De Anima, but rather from the division in Aristotle's Metaphysics between "being as being" and "being as true." Least of all known is the fact that Hervaeus, who uses the term "intentionality" in the present work 235 times, regards its significance as a relation of reason which runs in the direction of known or knowable to knower. Apart from its exceedingly obscure Latin style, what particularly makes this work difficult to understand is its multi-layered reflection on things and non-things, its reflection on Hervaeus' thinking itself, and its reflection on his thinking about his thinking about things and non-things. These volumes present a first critical Latin edition and an English translation of an important, but very difficult to read and understand, medieval treatise.

Religion and Doctor Who

Time and Relative Dimensions in Faith

Religion and Doctor Who

Doctor Who has always contained a rich current of religious themes and ideas. In its very first episode it asked how humans rationalize the seemingly supernatural, as two snooping schoolteachers refused to accept that the TARDIS was real. More recently it has toyed with the mystery of Doctor's real name, perhaps an echo of ancient religions and rituals in which knowledge of the secret name of a god, angel or demon was thought to grant a mortal power over the entity. But why does Doctor Who intersect with religion so often, and what do such instances tell us about the society that produces the show and the viewers who engage with it? The writers of Religion and Doctor Who: Time and Relative Dimensions in Faith attempt to answer these questions through an in-depth analysis of the various treatments of religion throughout every era of the show's history. While the majority of chapters focus on the television show Doctor Who, the authors also look at audios, novels, and the response of fandom. Their analyses--all written in an accessible but academically thorough style--reveal that examining religion in a long-running series such as Doctor Who can contribute to a number of key debates within faith communities and religious history. Most importantly, it provides another way of looking at why Doctor Who continues to inspire, to engage, and to excite generations of passionate fans, whatever their position on faith. The contributors are drawn from the UK, the USA, and Australia, and their approaches are similarly diverse. Chapters have been written by film scholars and sociologists; theologians and historians; rhetoricians, philosophers and anthropologists. Some write from the perspective of a particular faith or belief; others write from the perspective of no religious belief. All, however, demonstrate a solid knowledge of and affection for the brilliance of Doctor Who.