Dazzle Ships

Dazzle camouflage is a real-life example of information overload. When used on
ships during World War I, those colors and patterns served as extra information
that made it hard to figure out which way a ship was heading. Likewise, research
 ...

Dazzle Ships

A visually stunning look at innovative and eye-popping measures used to protect ships during World War I. During World War I, British and American ships were painted with bold colors and crazy patterns from bow to stern. Why would anyone put such eye-catching designs on ships? Desperate to protect ships from German torpedo attacks, British lieutenant-commander Norman Wilkinson proposed what became known as dazzle. These stunning patterns and colors were meant to confuse the enemy about a ship's speed and direction. By the end of the war, more than four thousand ships had been painted with these mesmerizing designs. Author Chris Barton and illustrator Victo Ngai vividly bring to life this little-known story of how the unlikely and the improbable became just plain dazzling.

Dazzle Ships

Editor for the press: Michael Holmes/a misFit book Cover design: Rachel
Ironstone Cover art: Popel Coumou Author photo: Deborah Lisoway Library and
Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication Sharpe, Jamie, author Dazzle ships
 ...

Dazzle Ships

Poems that challenge the depths of perception Dazzle camouflage, at the beginning of the 20th century, was an attempt to answer the question, How do we hide those things that are too big to hide? Ships, often containing thousands of soldiers, were done up in a confusing array of lines to perplex and distort the viewer’s perspective (in this case, German submarines). “Razzle dazzle” was art attempting to hide life. p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 16.0px Times; -webkit-text-stroke: #000000} span.s1 {font-kerning: none} Jamie Sharpe’s Dazzle Ships is also concerned with art’s relationship to life. It questions how we build poems from the material of mass culture. And in asking whether authentic modes of expression can be found in an increasingly automated world, Sharpe creates a poetry that is at once as disturbing as it is hilarious and as deeply profound as it is subtle.

Dazzle Ships and Figure Paintings

Dazzle Ships and Figure Paintings


Avoiding Attack

Post-war analysis of the effects of dazzle camouflage on shipping showed some
suggestive effects of dazzle, such as dazzle ships being missed by torpedoes
more, hit towards fore or aft rather than amidships, and overall sunk at a reduced
 ...

Avoiding Attack

Avoiding Attack discusses the diversity of mechanisms by which prey avoid predator attacks and explores how such defensive mechanisms have evolved through natural selection. It considers how potential prey avoid detection, how they make themselves unprofitable to attack, how they communicate this status, and how other species have exploited these signals. Using carefully selected examples of camouflage, mimicry, and warning signals drawn from a wide range of species and ecosystems, the authors summarise the latest research into these fascinating adaptations, developing mathematical models where appropriate and making recommendations for future study. This second edition has been extensively rewritten, particularly in the application of modern genetic research techniques which have transformed our recent understanding of adaptations in evolutionary genomics and phylogenetics. The book also employs a more integrated and systematic approach, ensuring that each chapter has a broader focus on the evolutionary and ecological consequences of anti-predator adaptation. The field has grown and developed considerably over the last decade with an explosion of new research literature, making this new edition timely.

Contested Objects

Thereafter, the monthly average dropped further to 55–60 ships lost (though this
still represented just under a quarter of a million tons) (Liddle 1997: xxvi–xxix).
The press interpreted these figures as proof that dazzle had been a great
success ...

Contested Objects

Contested Objects breaks new ground in the interdisciplinary study of material culture. Its focus is on the rich and varied legacy of objects from the First World War as the global conflict that defined the twentieth century. From the iconic German steel helmet to practice trenches on Salisbury Plain, and from the ‘Dazzle Ship’ phenomenon through medal-wearing, diary-writing, trophy collecting, the market in war souvenirs and the evocative reworking of European objects by African soldiers, this book presents a dazzling array of hitherto unseen worlds of the Great War. The innovative and multidisciplinary approach adopted here follows the lead established by Nicholas J. Saunders’ Matters of Conflict (Routledge 2004), and extends its geographical coverage to embrace a truly international perspective. Australia, Africa, Italy, Germany, France, Belgium and Britain are all represented by a cross-disciplinary group of scholars working in archaeology, anthropology, cultural history, art history, museology, and cultural heritage. The result is a volume that resonates with richly documented and theoretically informed case studies that illustrate how the experiences of war can be embodied in and represented by an endless variety of artefacts, whose ‘social lives’ have endured for almost a century and that continue to shape our perceptions of an increasingly dangerous world.

Artxpress

After the war , the U . S . Navy was to claim that less than one percent of the
painted ships was lost by torpedoes . The dazzle ships must have presented an
awesome sight massed in port , sometimes more than a hundred being painted
at ...

Artxpress


The Nautical Gazette

SPEED Present conditions in, ship construction demand a maximum of speed
without slighting ultimate efficiency. ... J. W. ISHERWOOD 17, Battery Place, New
York Tel Address: " ISHERCON," LONDON Dazzle Painting of Ships* By L1EUT.

The Nautical Gazette


Ship Shape a Dazzle Camouflage Sourcebook

This is an anthology of twenty-seven World War I-era essays, by various authors, on ship camouflage from that time period.

Ship Shape  a Dazzle Camouflage Sourcebook

This is an anthology of twenty-seven World War I-era essays, by various authors, on ship camouflage from that time period. It focuses primarily on American and British camouflage, and especially on "dazzle camouflage," a counter-intuitive method in which brightly colored abstract shapes were applied to the ship's surface. The purpose of such camouflage was not low visibility, but to make it difficult to aim a torpedo at a distant, moving ship from a submerged submarine (U-boat), while peering through a periscope. The book includes 275 drawings, diagrams and vintage photographs, and a 40-page camouflage bibiliography, the largest ever.

Transactions North East Coast Institution of Engineers and Shipbuilders

I believe there is little doubt that in many cases attacks on dazzle painted ships
have been abandoned by the enemy , without the vessel in danger of attack
being aware of the fact , owing to the submarine finding too late that she had
taken up ...

Transactions   North East Coast Institution of Engineers and Shipbuilders

List of members in each volume.

The Guardian Book of Rock Roll

famously about Hiroshima , ' Stanlow ' about a power station - yet Dazzle Ships
took off what McCluskey calls the sweet wrapper ' . For starters , the first single
was called ' Genetic Engineering ' . ' I was very positive about the subject ! I didn '
t ...

The Guardian Book of Rock   Roll

- The first anthology of the Guardian's brilliant music writing - To be promoted in the Guardian through space ads and on its website - Further promotion through the paper's Friday Film and Music section - Top music writers from Richard Williams to Nick Kent and Laura Barton - A prestigious addition to Aurum's high-quality music list