Dark Deleuze

This is gray literature publishing: where intense thinking, change, and speculation take place in scholarship.

Dark Deleuze

French philosopher Gilles Deleuze is known as a thinker of creation, joyous affirmation, and rhizomatic assemblages. In this short book, Andrew Culp polemically argues that this once-radical canon of joy has lost its resistance to the present. Concepts created to defeat capitalism have been recycled into business mantras that joyously affirm “Power is vertical; potential is horizontal!” Culp recovers the Deleuze’s forgotten negativity. He unsettles the prevailing interpretation through an underground network of references to conspiracy, cruelty, the terror of the outside, and the shame of being human. Ultimately, he rekindles opposition to what is intolerable about this world. Forerunners is a thought-in-process series of breakthrough digital works. Written between fresh ideas and finished books, Forerunners draws on scholarly work initiated in notable blogs, social media, conference plenaries, journal articles, and the synergy of academic exchange. This is gray literature publishing: where intense thinking, change, and speculation take place in scholarship.

Deleuze The Dark Precursor

his section continues the work of arguing for Deleuze's hidden dialectic, but this
time in conjunction with a new grouping of thinkers and a new focus on the
question of “structure,” another term rarely associated with Deleuze but
surprisingly ...

Deleuze  The Dark Precursor

Gilles Deleuze is considered one of the most important French philosophers of the twentieth century. Eleanor Kaufman situates Deleuze in relation to others of his generation, such as Jean-Paul Sartre, Pierre Klossowski, Maurice Blanchot, and Claude Lévi-Strauss, and she engages the provocative readings of Deleuze by Alain Badiou and Slavoj ?i?ek. Deleuze, The Dark Precursor is organized around three themes that critically overlap: dialectic, structure, and being. Kaufman argues that Deleuze's work is deeply concerned with these concepts, even when he advocates for the seemingly opposite notions of univocity, nonsense, and becoming. By drawing on scholastic thought and reading somewhat against the grain, Kaufman suggests that these often-maligned themes allow for a nuanced, even positive reflection on apparently negative states of being, such as extreme inertia. This attention to the negative or minor category has implications that extend beyond philosophy and into feminist theory, film, American studies, anthropology, and architecture.

What Is Art Education

After Deleuze and Guattari jan jagodzinski. Bogue, R. (2006) ... In C. V. Boundas
(Ed.), Deleuze and philosophy (pp. ... Available at https://anarchistwithoutcontent.
wordpress.com/2014/04/09/dark-deleuze-projectabstract/ Dakers, J. R. (2011a).

What Is Art Education

This edited book gathers seven established art educators-educator artists who address art education from the philosophical position of Deleuze and Guattari. This book raises questions as to where the future of art and its education might be heading if the focus on art was to be repositioned along Deleuze and Guattari’s philosophy of immanence. The chapters are speculative as they query what is ‘thinking’ in the art process. There is an attempt to project other forms of what art can ‘do,’ and the curriculum that can emerge when a student-centered problematic is explored along such lines.

Incontinence of the Void

In his Dark Deleuze (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2016), Andrew
Culp systematically opposes to the popular figure of Deleuze as the thinker of
creativity, joyous affirmation, and rhizomatic assemblages—the Deleuze easily ...

Incontinence of the Void

If the most interesting theoretical interventions emerge today from the interspaces between fields, then the foremost interspaceman is Slavoj Žižek. In Incontinence of the Void (the title is inspired by a sentence in Samuel Beckett's late masterpiece Ill Seen Ill Said), Žižek explores the empty spaces between philosophy, psychoanalysis, and the critique of political economy. He proceeds from the universal dimension of philosophy to the particular dimension of sexuality to the singular dimension of the critique of political economy. The passage from one dimension to another is immanent: the ontological void is accessible only through the impasses of sexuation and the ongoing prospect of the abolition of sexuality, which is itself opened up by the technoscientific progress of global capitalism, in turn leading to the critique of political economy. Responding to his colleague and fellow Short Circuits author Alenka Zupancic's What Is Sex?, Žižek examines the notion of an excessive element in ontology that gives body to radical negativity, which becomes the antagonism of sexual difference. From the economico-philosophical perspective, Žižek extrapolates from ontological excess to Marxian surplus value to Lacan's surplus enjoyment. In true Žižekian fashion, Incontinence of the Void focuses on eternal topics while detouring freely into contemporary issuesfrom the Internet of Things to Danish TV series.

Disconnect

42. Deleuze, Difference and Repetition, 57. 43. Daniel W. Smith, Essays on
Deleuze (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2012), 246. 44. Smith. 45.
Andrew Culp, Dark Deleuze (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2016),
66. 46.

Disconnect

An urgent examination of the threat posed to social media by user disconnection, and the measures websites will take to prevent it No matter how pervasive and powerful social media websites become, users always have the option of disconnecting—right? Not exactly, as Tero Karppi reveals in this disquieting book. Pointing out that platforms like Facebook see disconnection as an existential threat—and have undertaken wide-ranging efforts to eliminate it—Karppi argues that users’ ability to control their digital lives is gradually dissipating. Taking a nonhumancentric approach, Karppi explores how modern social media platforms produce and position users within a system of coded relations and mechanisms of power. For Facebook, disconnection is an intense affective force. It is a problem of how to keep users engaged with the platform, but also one of keeping value, attention, and desires within the system. Karppi uses Facebook’s financial documents as a map to navigate how the platform sees its users. Facebook’s plans to connect the entire globe through satellites and drones illustrates the material webs woven to keep us connected. Karppi analyzes how Facebook’s interface limits the opportunity to opt-out—even continuing to engage users after their physical death. Showing how users have fought to take back their digital lives, Karppi chronicles responses like Web2.0 Suicide Machine, an art project dedicated to committing digital suicide. For Karppi, understanding social media connectivity comes from unbinding the bonds that stop people from leaving these platforms. Disconnection brings us to the limit of user policies, algorithmic control, and platform politics. Ultimately, Karppi’s focus on the difficulty of disconnection, rather than the ease of connection, reveals how social media has come to dominate human relations.

The Dark Precursor

In this collection of essays numerous contributors offer perspectives on Deleuze’s concept of the dark precursor as it affects artistic research, providing a wide-ranging panorama on the intersection between music, art, philosophy, and ...

The Dark Precursor

Deleuze’s and Guattari’s philosophy in the field of artistic research Gilles Deleuze’s intriguing concept of the dark precursor refers to intensive processes of energetic flows passing between fields of different potentials. Fleetingly used in Difference and Repetition, it remained underexplored in Deleuze’s subsequent work. In this collection of essays numerous contributors offer perspectives on Deleuze’s concept of the dark precursor as it affects artistic research, providing a wide-ranging panorama on the intersection between music, art, philosophy, and scholarship. The forty-eight chapters in this publication present a kaleidoscopic view of different fields of knowledge and artistic practices, exposing for the first time the diversity and richness of a world situated between artistic research and the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari. Within different understandings of artistic research, the authors—composers, architects, performers, philosophers, sculptors, film-makers, painters, writers, and activists—map practices and invent concepts, contributing to a creative expansion of horizons, materials, and methodologies. Contributors VOLUME 1: Paulo de Assis, Arno Böhler, Edward Campbell, Diego Castro-Magas, Pascale Criton, Zornitsa Dimitrova, Lois Fitch, Mike Fletcher, Paolo Galli, Lindsay Gianoukas, Keir GoGwilt, Oleg Lebedev, Jimmie LeBlanc, Nicolas Marty, Frédéric Mathevet, Vincent Meelberg, Catarina Pombo Nabais, Tero Nauha, Gabriel Paiuk, Martin Scherzinger, Einar Torfi Einarsson, Steve Tromans, Toshiya Ueno, Susanne Valerie, Audronė Žukauskaitė VOLUME 2: Éric Alliez, Manola Antonioli, Jūratė Baranova, Zsuzsa Baross, Anna Barseghian, Ian Buchanan, Elena del Río, Luis de Miranda, Lucia D’Errico, Lilija Duoblienė, Adreis Echzehn, Jae Emerling, Verina Gfader, Ronny Hardliz, Rahma Khazam, Stefan Kristensen, Erin Manning, John Miers, Elfie Miklautz, Marc Ngui, Andreia Oliveira, Federica Pallaver, Andrej Radman, Felix Rebolledo, Anne Sauvagnargues, Janae Sholtz, Mhairi Vari, Mick Wilson, Elisabet Yanagisawa

Deleuze Beyond Badiou

Are identity and difference here the preconditions of the functioning of the dark
precursor, or are they, on the contrary, its effects? (DR 119). Of course Deleuze
argues for the latter, which means that the dark precursor projects “upon itself the
 ...

Deleuze Beyond Badiou

First published in 1997, Alain Badiou's Deleuze: The Clamor of Being cast Gilles Deleuze as a secret philosopher of the One. In this work, Clayton Crockett rehabilitates Deleuze's position within contemporary political and philosophical thought, advancing an original reading of the thinker's major works and a constructive conception of his philosophical ontology. Through close readings of Deleuze's Difference and Repetition, Capitalism and Schizophrenia (with Felix Guattari), and Cinema 2, Crockett argues that Deleuze is anything but the austere, quietistic, and aristocratic intellectual Badiou had portrayed. Instead, Crockett underscores Deleuze's radical aesthetics and innovative scientific, political, and mathematical forms of thought. He also refutes the notion Deleuze retreated from politics toward the end of his life. Using Badiou's critique as a foil, Crockett maintains the profound continuity of Deleuze's work and builds a general interpretation of his more obscure formulations.

Radical Political Theology

(passive synthesis, habit), and it is what gives a future, Deleuze proclaims,
following Nietzsche, Paul's antipode. Resurrection ... Differences relate according
to a temporal process of differentiation, which Deleuze describes as a dark
precursor.

Radical Political Theology

In the 1960s, the strict opposition between the religious and the secular began to break down, blurring the distinction between political philosophy and political theology. This collapse contributed to the decline of modern liberalism, which supported a neutral, value-free space for capitalism. It also deeply unsettled political, religious, and philosophical realms, forced to confront the conceptual stakes of a return to religion. Gamely intervening in a contest that defies simple resolutions, Clayton Crockett conceives of the postmodern convergence of the secular and the religious as a basis for emancipatory political thought. Engaging themes of sovereignty, democracy, potentiality, law, and event from a religious and political point of view, Crockett articulates a theological vision that responds to our contemporary world and its theo-political realities. Specifically, he claims we should think about God and the state in terms of potentiality rather than sovereign power. Deploying new concepts, such as Slavoj i ek's idea of parallax and Catherine Malabou's notion of plasticity, his argument engages with debates over the nature and status of religion, ideology, and messianism. Tangling with the work of Derrida, Deleuze, Spinoza, Antonio Negri, Giorgio Agamben, Alain Badiou, John D. Caputo, and Catherine Keller, Crockett concludes with a reconsideration of democracy as a form of political thought and religious practice, underscoring its ties to modern liberal capitalism while also envisioning a more authentic democracy unconstrained by those ties.

Arts of Subjectivity A New Animism for the Post Media Era

Chiesa, L. (2017), “Exalted Obscenity and the Lawyer of God: Lacan, Deleuze
and the Baroque,” in B. Nedoh and A. Zevnik, eds., Lacan and Deleuze: A ... Culp
, A. (2016), Dark Deleuze, Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

Arts of Subjectivity  A New Animism for the Post Media Era

Bringing thinking from the arts and digital humanities into dialogue with one another, this book investigates what it means to be alive in a world that is structured by technology, the media, and an ever expanding sense of a global community. In this unique time in our history, when we are bombarded by signs and symbols and constantly connected into gadgets, apps, and networks, it has become increasingly difficult to navigate what has been dubbed a 'post-truth' world. Critiques taken from post-colonial studies and neoanimism help challenge the paranoia that has become endemic and, indeed, symptomatic to global realities we are now witnessing. This pertains not only to the ecological degradation of the planet but also to the lingering remnants of eurocentrism and racism that have taken the forms of nationalism and fascism. As a guide, an updated version of what Michel Foucault called an arts of existence may help us sail in these treacherous and confusing waters. Diving into post-structuralist French theory, through American feminism, and emerging out of media studies, this book argues for an ethical and aesthetic form of self-fashioning that runs counter to processes subjection and mediatization. This craft of life, as Plato called it, is a space of disjunction and liberation, between subjectivity and other, where something new and different has the potential to emerge and mould to our likeness.

Goth s Dark Empire

Following the lead of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari's first academic popu-
larizer, Ronald Bogue, I have chosen to avoid the “somewhat awkward . . .
neologism” “Deleuzoguattarian” except when it seems absolutely necessary to
clarity, ...

Goth s Dark Empire

In Goth's Dark Empire cultural historian Carol Siegel provides a fascinating look at Goth, a subculture among Western youth. It came to prominence with punk performers such as Marilyn Manson and was made infamous when it was linked (erroneously) to the Columbine High School murders. While the fortunes of Goth culture form a portion of this book's story, Carol Siegel is more interested in pursuing Goth as a means of resisting regimes of sexual normalcy, especially in its celebration of sadomasochism (S/M). The world of Goth can appear wide-ranging: from films such as Edward Scissorhands and The Crow to popular fiction such as Anne Rice's "vampire" novels to rock bands such as Nine Inch Nails. But for Siegel, Goth appears as a mode of being sexually undead -- and loving it. What was Goth and what happened to it? In this book, Siegel tracks Goth down, reveals the sources of its darkness, and shows that Goth as a response to the modern world has not disappeared but only escaped underground.