Cruel and Unusual Punishment

The punishments for misconduct not serious enough to result in punitive isolation
were cruel, unusual, and unpredictable. The Court elaborated: Cummins Farm,
the institution at the center of this litigation, required its 1,000 inmates to work in ...

Cruel and Unusual Punishment

In one of the lengthiest, noisiest, and hottest legal debates in U.S. history, Cruel and Unusual Punishment stands out as a levelheaded, even-handed, and thorough analysis of the issue. * A focused list of primary source documents includes the Magna Carta, the Northwest Ordinance, the 5th, 8th, and 14th Amendments, and excerpts from the Federalist Papers * Appendixes include tables and charts on public opinion on the death penalty, state statistics, federal sentencing guidelines, and a bibliography

Cruel Unusual

... unnatural,” 193; “cruel and unusual,” 2, 8, 10,20, 65, 118-19, 155, 161-64,
166,170, 176-78,180-81, 184, 187-89,192,197,200, 204, 209-11, 215, 244, 281,
291-92, 294, 301, 303, 306-8, 311-12, 315,322,328, 331-33, 343-44, 397; “cruel,
 ...

Cruel   Unusual

This indispensable history of the Eighth Amendment and the founders' views of capital punishment is also a passionate call for the abolition of the death penalty based on the notion of cruel and unusual punishment

Cruel And Unusual

Cruel And Unusual

The fourth book in the Kay Scarpetta series, from No. 1 bestselling author Patricia Cornwell. 'America's most chilling writer of crime fiction' The Times The fingerprints say the murderer is the man who's just been executed . . . At 11.05 one December evening in Richmond, Virginia, convicted murderer Ronnie Joe Waddell is pronounced dead in the electric chair. At the morgue Dr Kay Scarpetta waits for Waddell's body. Preparing to perform a post-mortem before the subject is dead is a strange feeling, but Scarpetta has been here before. And Waddell's death is not the only newsworthy event on this freezing night: the grotesquely wounded body of a young boy is found propped against a rubbish skip. To Scarpetta the two cases seem unrelated, until she recalls that the body of Waddell's victim had been arranged in a strikingly similar position . . .

The Story of Cruel and Unusual

The dissenting justic understood Francis's experience to be akin to "torture
culminating in death and asked, "How many deliberate and intentional
reapplications of elect current does it take to produce a cruel, unusual and
unconstitution ...

The Story of Cruel and Unusual

A searing indictment of the American penal system that finds the roots of the recent prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib and Guantánamo in the steady dismantling of the Eighth Amendment's prohibition of "cruel and unusual" punishment. The revelations of prisoner abuse and torture at Abu Ghraib and more recently at Guantánamo were shocking to most Americans. And those who condemned the treatment of prisoners abroad have focused on U.S. military procedures and abuses of executive powers in the war on terror, or, more specifically, on the now-famous White House legal counsel memos on the acceptable limits of torture. But in The Story of Cruel and Unusual, Colin Dayan argues that anyone who has followed U.S. Supreme Court decisions regarding the Eighth Amendment prohibition of "cruel and unusual" punishment would recognize the prisoners' treatment at Abu Ghraib and Guantánamo as a natural extension of the language of our courts and practices in U.S. prisons. In fact, it was no coincidence that White House legal counsel referred to a series of Supreme Court decisions in the 1980s and 1990s in making its case for torture.Dayan traces the roots of "acceptable" torture to slave codes of the nineteenth century that deeply embedded the dehumanization of the incarcerated in our legal system. Although the Eighth Amendment was interpreted generously during the prisoners' rights movement of the late 1960s and 1970s, this period of judicial concern was an anomaly. Over the last thirty years, Supreme Court decisions have once again dismantled Eighth Amendment protections and rendered such words as "cruel" and "inhuman" meaningless when applied to conditions of confinement and treatment during detention. Prisoners' actual pain and suffering have been explained away in a rhetorical haze—with rationalizations, for example, that measure cruelty not by the pain or suffering inflicted, but by the intent of the person who inflicted it. The Story of Cruel and Unusual is a stunningly original work of legal scholarship, and a searing indictment of the U.S. penal system.

Preventing Cruel and Unusual Punishment

By changing “ought not” to “shall not,” Mason hoped to create a stronger, more
effective law, though the meanings of “cruel,” “unusual,” and “excessive” remain
difficult to determine. THE JUDICIARY ACT OF 1789 Some critics of the new.

Preventing Cruel and Unusual Punishment

The Founding Fathers created the Eighth Amendment to protect the people from the kind of abuse they had seen while the colonies were under British rule. But to this day, Americans continue to argue about what exactly “cruel and unusual,” “excessive bail,” and “excessive fines” mean. Through full-color and black-and-white photos, engaging text, and primary sources, students will examine the events leading up to the Eighth Amendment’s creation, how it has been defined throughout the centuries, and how it is interpreted today. In addition, informative sidebars and a further reading section with books and websites encourage students to explore the people and events of this time in history in more depth.

Cruel and Unusual Idiots

Cruel and Unusual Idiots

Some wonder why and some wonder why not. But it's the latter ones who make you scratch your head and say, 'What in the world were you thinking?'" Former Saturday Night Live writer Leland Gregory skewers cruel crooks and the idiotically inane. From absurd 911 calls to presidential philosophizing and political pandering to foolish felons, Leland Gregory generates the best laughs by exposing the worst of human nature. Inside this collection, Gregory offers more than 275 accounts of human stupidity at its most malicious and peculiar: * In August 2006, 40-year-old Darrel Rodgers was treated at a Bloomington, Indiana, hospital for a self-inflicted gunshot wound to his left knee. Rogers explained that he shot himself seeking to relieve the pain in his knee, which probably stemmed from shooting himself in the same knee ten years earlier. * And, because some of the stories are just that unbelievable, each anecdote, quote, or factoid is presented with relevant background information--including its verified news source.

Cruel and Unusual

In "Cruel and Unusual," Mark Crispin Miller exposes what he calls the Bush Republicans' contempt for democratic practice, their bullying religiosity, their reckless militarism, and their apocalyptic views of the economy and the planet.

Cruel and Unusual

In "Cruel and Unusual," Mark Crispin Miller exposes what he calls the Bush Republicans' contempt for democratic practice, their bullying religiosity, their reckless militarism, and their apocalyptic views of the economy and the planet.

Cruel but Not Unusual

... for intervention at multiple levels—individual, family, community, and policy—
as a way to focus and mobilize change. Indisputably, Canadians of all ages—
from infants in arms to older adults—bear the cruel brunt of violence in their
families.

Cruel but Not Unusual

Violence in families and intimate relationships affects a significant proportion of the population—from very young children to the elderly—with far-reaching and often devastating consequences. Cruel but Not Unusual draws on the expertise of scholars and practitioners to present readers with the latest research and thinking about the history, conditions, and impact of violence in these contexts. For this new edition, chapters have been updated to reflect changes in data and legislation. New chapters include an examination of trauma from a neurobiological perspective; a critical analysis of the “gender symmetry debate,” a debate that questions the gendered nature of intimate violence; and an essay on the history and evolution of the women’s movement dedicated to addressing violence against women, which advances theoretical developments that remind readers of the breadth of inclusivity that should be at the heart of working in this field.

State Constitutions and Criminal Justice

Appendix F A Note on the Cruel and Unusual Punishment Provisions of the U.S.
and the State Constitutions Twenty state provisions use the federal Eighth
Amendment locution "cruel and unusual" punishment, whereas twenty-one use "
cruel ...

State Constitutions and Criminal Justice

The new "judicial federalism" is a significant development in American law: more cases are being decided by state constitutions than ever before in history. In this book, Latzer provides the most thorough treatment available of the criminal law aspects of the New Federalism. His thoroughly researched and documented analysis of the state law movement covers all fifty states over the past two decades. This is an important resource for anyone concerned with the political-ideological tension between federal and state courts.

Cruel and Unusual

Cruel and Unusual

The true and gripping account of the nine-year struggle by a small band of lawyers to abolish the death penalty in the United States. Its new edition features a 2011 Foreword by death-penalty author Evan Mandery of CUNY's John Jay College of Criminal Justice, as well as a new Preface by the author.The mission, plotted out over lunch in New York's Central Park in the early 1960s, seemed as impossible as going to the moon: abolish capital punishment in every state. The approach would fight on multiple fronts, with multiple strategies. The people would be dedicated, bright, unsure, unpopular, and fascinating. This is their story: not only the cases and the arguments before courts, the death row inmates and their victims, the judges and politicians urging law and order, this is the true account of the real-life lawyers from the inside. The United States indeed went to the moon, and a few years later the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the death penalty unconstitutional. The victory was long-sought and sweet, and the pages of this book vividly let the reader live the struggle and the victory. And while the abolition eventually became as impermanent as the nation's presence on the moon, these dedicated attorneys certainly made a difference. This is their tale.As Evan Mandery writes in his new Foreword, "In these pages, Meltsner lays bare every aspect of his and his colleaguesi thinking. You will read how they handicapped their chances, which arguments they thought would work (you may be surprised), and what they thought of the Supreme Court justices who would decide the crucial cases. You will come to understand what they perceived to be the basis for support for the death penalty, and, with Meltsner's unflinching honesty, what they perceived to be the inconsistencies in their position."Mandery concludes: "It is my odd lot in life to have read almost every major book ever written about the death penalty in America. This is the best and the most important. Every serious scholar who wants to advance an argument about capital punishment in the United States--whether it is abolitionist or in favor of the death penalty, or merely a tactical assessment--cites this book. It is open and supremely accessible." And the author's "constitutional vision was years ahead of its time. His book is timeless." Part of the Legal History and Biography Series from Quid Pro Books, the new ebook editions feature embedded pagination from previous editions (consistent with the new paperback edition as well, allowing continuity in all formats), active TOC and endnotes, and quality digital formatting.