Haunted Canada 5: Terrifying True Stories

Haunted Canada 5: Terrifying True Stories

Don't turn out the lights! Joel Sutherland returns for the frightful fifth installment of the Haunted Canada series. The organ at the Cathedral of the Holy Trinity in Quebec City plays by itself, and Queen Elizabeth II reportedly saw a mysterious figure on the balcony during her visit in 1964 . . . Late at night, after Vancouver's Old Spaghetti Factory restaurant has closed, a shadowy man in uniform is seen boarding the decommissioned trolley car that sits in the middle of the dining room . . . With more than 25 terrifying new tales of ghostly encounters and mysterious phenomena, Haunted Canada 5 is guaranteed to keep kids across the country awake and screaming!

Haunted Halls

Ghostlore of American College Campuses

Haunted Halls

Why do so many American college students tell stories about encounters with ghosts? In Haunted Halls, the first book-length interpretive study of college ghostlore, Elizabeth Tucker takes the reader back to school to get acquainted with a wide range of college spirits. Some of the best-known ghosts that she discusses are Emory University\'s Dooley, who can disband classes by shooting professors with his water pistol; Mansfield Uni-versity\'s Sara, who threw herself down a flight of stairs after being rejected by her boyfriend; and Huntingdon College\'s Red Lady, who slit her wrists while dressed in a red robe. Gettysburg College students have collided with ghosts of soldiers, while students at St. Mary-of-the-Woods College have reported frightening glimpses of the Faceless Nun. Tucker presents campus ghostlore from the mid-1960s to 2006, with special attention to stories told by twenty-first-century students through e-mail and instant messages. Her approach combines social, psychological, and cultural analysis, with close attention to students\' own explanations of the significance of spectral phenomena. As metaphors of disorder, insanity, and school spirit, college ghosts convey multiple meanings. Their colorful stories warn students about the dangers of overindulgence, as well as the pitfalls of potentially horrifying relationships. Besides offering insight into students\' initiation into campus life, college ghost stories make important statements about injustices suffered by Native Americans, African Americans, and others.

Terrifying Texts

Essays on Books of Good and Evil in Horror Cinema

Terrifying Texts

From Faust (1926) to The Babadook (2014), books have been featured in horror films as warnings, gateways, prisons and manifestations of the monstrous. Ancient grimoires such as the Necronomicon serve as timeless vessels of knowledge beyond human comprehension, while runes, summoning diaries, and spell books offer their readers access to the powers of the supernatural--but at what cost? This collection of new essays examines nearly a century of genre horror in which on-screen texts drive and shape their narratives, sometimes unnoticed. The contributors explore American films like The Evil Dead (1981), The Prophecy (1995) and It Follows (2014), as well as such international films as Eric Valette's Malefique (2002), Paco Cabeza's The Appeared (2007) and Lucio Fulci's The Beyond (1981).

What Happens Next? Contemporary Urban Legends and Popular Culture

What Happens Next? Contemporary Urban Legends and Popular Culture

This fascinating book uncovers the history behind urban legends and explains how the contemporary iterations of familiar fictional tales provide a window into the modern concerns—and digital advancements—of our society. • Extended examples of the literature and references to contemporary legends • Relevant, insightful comments from seasoned authors in the genre • A comprehensive overview of recent available research • A list of Internet sites that debunk or confirm urban legends

Haunted

Tales of the Grotesque

Haunted

Sixteen neo-gothic tales of horror, the grotesque, and the dark side of the human imagination focus on the themes of violence in American society and the exploitation of women and children

Ghost Stories from the American Southwest

Ghost Stories from the American Southwest

This collection of tales will bring its readers plenty of delicious shivers.

The Amber Gods, and Other Stories

The Amber Gods, and Other Stories

A widely-held vision of nineteenth-century American women is of lives lived in naive, domestic peace - the girls of Little Women making do until father comes home from the war. Nothing could be less true of Harriet Prescott Spofford's stories - in fact, her editor at the Atlantic Monthly at first refused to believe that an unworldly woman from New England had written them. Her style, though ornate by our 20th century standards, adds to its atmosphere, like heavy, Baroque furniture in a large and creepy house. The title story presents a self-centered and captivating woman who ruthlessly steals her orphan cousin's lover. In "Circumstance," a pioneer woman returning home through the woods at night is caught by a panther; her husband, who has come to save her, can only watch from the ground as she sings for her life, pinned in a tree. A train engineer hallucinates again and again that he is running over his wife. And Mrs. Craven, who's a bit "weak" in the head, mindlessly repeats "Three men went down cellar and only two came up." These stories combine elements of the best ghost stories - timing, detail, and character - with just enough chill to make you think twice about turning out your lights at night. -- For great reviews of books for girls, check out Let's Hear It for the Girls: 375 Great Books for Readers 2-14. -- From 500 Great Books by Women; review by Erica Bauermeister

Voices

The Journal of New York Folklore

Voices