Classical Potential Theory and Its Probabilistic Counterpart

Classical Potential Theory and Its Probabilistic Counterpart

From the reviews: "Here is a momumental work by Doob, one of the masters, in which Part 1 develops the potential theory associated with Laplace's equation and the heat equation, and Part 2 develops those parts (martingales and Brownian motion) of stochastic process theory which are closely related to Part 1". --G.E.H. Reuter in Short Book Reviews (1985)

Counterpart

Counterpart

The high-intensity sci-fi thriller series that began with Machinations continues as reincarnated insurgent Rhona Long faces off against the one enemy she can’t outwit: her own clone. The machines believed their extermination of the human race would be over as quickly as it began. They were wrong. As the war against extinction intensifies, people are beginning to gain the upper hand. Commander Rhona Long understands survival better than most. Killed in combat, she was brought back to life using her DNA, and she’s forged a new, even more powerful identity. Now the leader of the resistance, she’s determined to ensure the machines are shut down for good. But victory is elusive. The machines have a new technology designed to overcome humanity’s most advanced weaponry. Despite Rhona’s peacekeeping efforts, former nations are feuding over resources as old power struggles resurface. Worse, someone inside the resistance is sabotaging the human cause—someone who, from all appearances, seems to be Rhona . . . or her exact replica.

Southern Counterpart to Lewis & Clark

The Freeman & Custis Expedition of 1806

Southern Counterpart to Lewis & Clark

In 1806 President Thomas Jefferson sent cartographer Thomas Freeman and botanist Peter Custis to explore the southen Louisiana Purchase westward to the Rocky Moutnains. Stopped by a Spanish army in what is today extreme southern Oklahoma, they did not complete their mission. President Jefferson minimized their failure by focusing instead on the success of their northern counterparts Lewis and Clark. Hence the fame of Lewis and Clark and the virtual anonymity of Freeman and Custis-until now, thanks to editor Dan L. Flores. Dan Flores presents the primary documents created by Freeman and Custis during their ill-fated attempt to explore the Louisiana territory and areas west of the Mississippi in 1806.

Counterpart

Counterpart

Poetry. Elizabeth Robinson's new book investigates the uncanny doubleness inherent in each self, the hells unacknowledged in self-examination. Filled with mirrors, doppelg„ngers, puppets, and dreams, COUNTERPART brings the best of Robinson's thoughtful lyricism to deeply important questions every soul grapples with.

European Program

Local Currency Counterpart Funds

European Program


Local Currency Counterpart Funds; European Program

Local Currency Counterpart Funds; European Program


What Are We?

A Study in Personal Ontology

What Are We?

From the time of Locke, discussions of personal identity have often ignored the question of our basic metaphysical nature: whether we human people are biological organisms, spatial or temporal parts of organisms, bundles of perceptions, or what have you. The result of this neglect has been centuries of wild proposals and clashing intuitions. What Are We? is the first general study of this important question. It beings by explaining what the question means and how it differs from others, such as questions of personal identity and the mind-body problem. It then examines in some depth the main possible accounts of our metaphysical nature, detailing both their theoretical virtues and the often grave difficulties they face. The book does not endorse any particular account of what we are, but argues that the matter turns on more general issues in the ontology of material things. If composition is universal--if any material things whatever make up something bigger--then we are temporal parts of organisms. If things never compose anything bigger, so that there are only mereological simples, then we too are simples--perhaps the immaterial substances of Descartes--or else we do not exist at all (a view Olson takes very seriously). The intermediate view that some things compose bigger things and others do not leads almost inevitably to the conclusion that we are organisms. So we can discover what we are by working out when composition occurs.

Beautiful Land of the Sky

John Muir’s Forgotten Eastern Counterpart, Harlan P. Kelsey

Beautiful Land of the Sky

John Muir is considered to be the supreme icon of western wilderness and preservation. His counterpart in the east is Harlan P. Kelsey, an often obscure and forgotten figure. In Beautiful Land of the Sky, author Loren M. Wood chronicles Kelsey’s journey from the humblest of beginnings to national prominence in horticulture and the establishment of national parks in the eastern United States. In this biography, Wood tells how, a century ago, Kelsey was the first to pioneer native plants for the American landscape and a leader in that process; how he was a leading participant in bringing all of America to our native plants in their finest original setting; and how he helped make a reality of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, a zenith of horticultural biomass and diversity in America. In addition, this biography explores the parallels in the odysseys of Muir and Kelsey. Though primarily a biography of Kelsey, Wood compares the similarities, differences, and accomplishments of the two men. Including details gathered from more than fifty thousand items in Kelsey’s personal files, Beautiful Land of the Sky narrates the inspiring and entertaining story of how the idea of national parks was implemented east of the Mississippi.