Conversations with Scripture

The Gospel of Matthew

Conversations with Scripture

"This book invites readers to enter the narrative world and the historical context of Matthew's gospel to encounter Jesus Christ in his mighty works and words. Focusing on particular social and theological issues, such as eschatology and Jewish-Christian conflict, it shows how Matthew used Jesus' stories and teachings to instruct and sustain his racially-mixed church to meet the severe challenges posed by Pharisaic opposition, Roman suspicion and intramural tension. It is worth noting that the church today faces similar challenges in its need to articulate its faith and identity, to bear strong witness and unity, and to carry out its missions to baptize and teach the world. Sponsored by the Anglican Association of Biblical Scholars, the Conversations with Scripture series was created just for Episcopalians. Each book is designed for people in the pews eager to learn more about Scripture--and how it applies to their lives today."

Synopsis

Synopsis

Lists the scholarly publications including research and review journals, books, and monographs relating to classical, Hellenistic, Biblical, Byzantine, Medieval, and modern Greece. The 11 indexes include article title and author, books reviewed, theses and dissertations, books and authors, journals, names, locations, and subjects. The format continues that of the second volume. All the information has been programmed onto the disc in a high-level language, so that no other software is needed to read it, and in versions for DOS and Apple on each disc. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Translation and Bilingual Dictionaries

Translation and Bilingual Dictionaries

Is the bilingual dictionary really the translator's best friend? Or is it the case that all translators hate all dictionaries? The truth probably lies half-way. It is difficult to verify anyway, as the literature on the subject(s) is limited, not helped by the fact that Lexicography and Translation have stood apart for decades despite their commonality of purpose. Here is a volume, based on the proceedings of a successful conference at Hong Kong, that may at last provide some answers.

A History of New Testament Lexicography

A History of New Testament Lexicography

New Testament lexicons of today are comprehensive, up-to-date, and authoritative. Behind them lies a tradition dating back to the sixteenth century, whose characteristics are not well known. Besides giving a history of this tradition, A History of New Testament Lexicography demonstrates its less satisfactory features, notably its dependence on predecessors, the influence of translations, and its methodological shortcomings. John A. L. Lee not only criticizes the existing tradition, but stimulates thought on new goals that New Testament lexicography needs to set for itself in the twenty-first century. This book caters to the non-specialist as well as those interested in philological detail.

Luke

Gospel to the Nameless and Faceless

Luke

In Luke: Gospel to the Nameless and Faceless, Dr. W. Mark Tew offers the Christian reader a commentary like none other. Combining a detailed examination of the Greek text, a fresh translation of the Gospel, and a commitment to presenting the meaning of the Gospel in a fluid and contemporary fashion, Luke: Gospel to the Nameless and Faceless presents the advanced student and the casual reader alike with an inspirational look at the timeless beauty of Luke's Gospel. Committed to the literary integrity of Scripture, the author allowed the Greek text of the Gospel of Luke to determine the organizational structure of the book. Because of this, readers will find themselves immersed in the message of Jesus that Luke portrayed. Luke: Gospel to the Nameless and Faceless is destined to become an inspirational classic.

Luke 6:40 and the Theme of Likeness Education in the New Testament

Luke 6:40 and the Theme of Likeness Education in the New Testament

What does Jesus mean when he says, A disciple is not above his teacher, but each disciple, after being fully trained, will be like his teacher (Luke 6:40)? This verse has been quoted, cited, and referenced in vast amounts of Christian education and discipleship literature. Nevertheless, the verse is nearly untouched in exegetical discussions with the exception of source-critical analyses. From this verse arises an undeveloped theme in the Gospel of Luke and the New Testament--the theme of likeness education. Using content analysis methodology, Luke 6:40--one of the keystone passages in Christian education literature--serves as the starting point for mining out the theme of likeness education in the New Testament. This study consists of three concentric areas of investigation: (1) Luke 6:40 and its immediate context, (2) Luke-Acts, and (3) the New Testament corpus.

Portraits of Devotion

Portraits of Devotion

From Beth Moore's Personal Reflection Series on the lives of Jesus, David, John, and Paul comes 366 devotional readings to draw you closer to God. Experience the life-changing, bondage-breaking power of God's Word each day as you journey through some of the most amazing stories of devotion found in the Bible.