Commentaries on the Laws of England, Volume 1

A Facsimile of the First Edition of 1765-1769

Commentaries on the Laws of England, Volume 1

Sir William Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England (1765-1769) stands as the first great effort to reduce the English common law to a unified and rational system. Blackstone demonstrated that the English law as a system of justice was comparable to Roman law and the civil law of the Continent. Clearly and elegantly written, the work achieved immediate renown and exerted a powerful influence on legal education in England and in America which was to last into the late nineteenth century. The book is regarded not only as a legal classic but as a literary masterpiece. Previously available only in an expensive hardcover set, Commentaries on the Laws of England is published here in four separate volumes, each one affordably priced in a paperback edition. These works are facsimiles of the eighteenth-century first edition and are undistorted by later interpolations. Each volume deals with a particular field of law and carries with it an introduction by a leading contemporary scholar. In his introduction to this first volume, Of the Rights of Persons, Stanley N. Katz presents a brief history of Blackstone's academic and legal career and his purposes in writing the Commentaries. Katz discusses Blackstone's treatment of the structure of the English legal system, his attempts to justify it as the best form of government, and some of the problems he encountered in doing so.

Commentaries on the Laws of England

Commentaries on the Laws of England

Oxford's variorum edition of William Blackstone's seminal treatise on the common law of England and Wales offers the definitive account of the Commentaries' development in a modern format. For the first time it is possible to trace the evolution of English law and Blackstone's thought through the eight editions of Blackstone's lifetime, and the authorial corrections of the posthumous ninth edition. Introductions by the general editor and the volume editors set the Commentaries in their historical context, examining Blackstone's distinctive view of the common law, and editorial notes throughout the four volumes assist the modern reader in understanding this key text in the Anglo-American common law tradition. Book I: Of the Rights of Persons covers the key topics of constitutional and public law. Blackstone's inaugural lecture 'On the Study of the Law' introduces a series of general essays on the nature of law, including a chapter on 'The Absolute Rights of Individuals' . This is followed by an extended account of England's political constitution. The various categories of people or subjects are then surveyed, with special attention to the rights and obligations of masters and servants, husbands and wives, parents and children, and lastly 'artificial persons', or corporations. In addition to David Lemmings' introduction to the volume, Book I includes an introduction from the General Editor Wilfrid Prest.

Commentaries on the Laws of England, Volume 4

A Facsimile of the First Edition of 1765-1769

Commentaries on the Laws of England, Volume 4

Sir William Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England (1765-1769) stands as the first great effort to reduce the English common law to a unified and rational system. Blackstone demonstrated that the English law as a system of justice was comparable to Roman law and the civil law of the Continent. Clearly and elegantly written, the work achieved immediate renown and exerted a powerful influence on legal education in England and in America which was to last into the late nineteenth century. The book is regarded not only as a legal classic but as a literary masterpiece. Previously available only in an expensive hardcover set, Commentaries on the Laws of England is published here in four separate volumes, each one affordably priced in a paperback edition. These works are facsimiles of the eighteenth-century first edition and are undistorted by later interpolations. Each volume deals with a particular field of law and carries with it an introduction by a leading contemporary scholar. Introducing this fourth and final volume, Of Public Wrongs, Thomas A. Green examines Blackstone's attempt to rationalize the severity of the law with what he saw as the essentially humane inspiration of English law. Green discusses Blackstone's ideas on criminal law, criminal procedure, and sentencing.

Commentaries on the Laws of England

Book IV: On Public Wrongs

Commentaries on the Laws of England

The Commentaries were long regarded as the leading work on the development of English law and played a role in the development of the American legal system. They were in fact the first methodical treatise on the common law suitable for a lay readership since at least the Middle Ages. This is book four out of four, including more than 1700 footnotes and annotations.

The Commentaries of Sir William Blackstone, Knight, on the Laws and Constitution of England

The Commentaries of Sir William Blackstone, Knight, on the Laws and Constitution of England

This handsome book is part of the new, ABA Classics Series. These authoritative, affordable, and beautifully designed editions of the world's greatest law books are perfect for any law library or office or as a gift for anyone involved or interested in the law. This volume of the ABA Classics Series is Blackstone's Commentaries. This legal classic from famed eighteenth-century judge, jurist, and professor Sir William Blackstone.

COMMENTARIES ON THE LAWS OF EN

COMMENTARIES ON THE LAWS OF EN

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