The Colossus of New York

The Colossus of New York

In a dazzlingly original work of nonfiction, the Pulitzer-Prize winning author of The Underground Railroad recreates the exuberance, the chaos, the promise, and the heartbreak of New York. Here is a literary love song that will entrance anyone who has lived in—or spent time—in the greatest of American cities. A masterful evocation of the city that never sleeps, The Colossus of New York captures the city’s inner and outer landscapes in a series of vignettes, meditations, and personal memories. Colson Whitehead conveys with almost uncanny immediacy the feelings and thoughts of longtime residents and of newcomers who dream of making it their home; of those who have conquered its challenges; and of those who struggle against its cruelties. Whitehead’s style is as multilayered and multifarious as New York itself: Switching from third person, to first person, to second person, he weaves individual voices into a jazzy musical composition that perfectly reflects the way we experience the city. There is a funny, knowing riff on what it feels like to arrive in New York for the first time; a lyrical meditation on how the city is transformed by an unexpected rain shower; and a wry look at the ferocious battle that is commuting. The plaintive notes of the lonely and dispossessed resound in one passage, while another captures those magical moments when the city seems to be talking directly to you, inviting you to become one with its rhythms. The Colossus of New York is a remarkable portrait of life in the big city. Ambitious in scope, gemlike in its details, it is at once an unparalleled tribute to New York and the ideal introduction to one of the most exciting writers working today.

Literature after 9/11

Literature after 9/11

Drawing on trauma theory, genre theory, political theory, and theories of postmodernity, space, and temporality, Literature After 9/11 suggests ways that these often distinct discourses can be recombined and set into dialogue with one another as it explores 9/11’s effects on literature and literature’s attempts to convey 9/11.

The Colossus of Maroussi (Second Edition)

The Colossus of Maroussi (Second Edition)

Henry Miller’s landmark travel book, now reissued in a new edition, is ready to be stuffed into any vagabond’s backpack. Like the ancient colossus that stood over the harbor of Rhodes, Henry Miller’s The Colossus of Maroussi stands as a seminal classic in travel literature. It has preceded the footsteps of prominent travel writers such as Pico Iyer and Rolf Potts. The book Miller would later cite as his favorite began with a young woman’s seductive description of Greece. Miller headed out with his friend Lawrence Durrell to explore the Grecian countryside: a flock of sheep nearly tramples the two as they lie naked on a beach; the Greek poet Katsmbalis, the “colossus” of Miller’s book, stirs every rooster within earshot of the Acropolis with his own loud crowing; cold hard-boiled eggs are warmed in a village’s single stove, and they stay in hotels that “have seen better days, but which have an aroma of the past.”

Time Out New York

Time Out New York

Now in its 20th edition, Time Out New York provides the inside track on the Big Apple in an exhaustive guide with illuminating features and hundreds of independent unbiased venue reviews covering everything from iconic skyscrapers to buzzing neighborhoods. The guide offers an exhaustive overview of everything the city has to offer in terms of tourist attractions, eating and drinking, shopping, clubs and the sights — everything from pizza and bagels to shopping green. Comprehensive coverage of the city's incomparable arts and culture scene makes this an invaluable sourcebook for tourists and natives alike. An extensive month-by-month calendar of events is included. Escapes and excursions within relatively easy reach for day or overnight trips are also included.

Year 501

The Conquest Continues

Year 501

.The great work of subjugation and conquest. has changed little over the years. Analyzing Haiti, Latin America, Cuba, Indonesia, and even pockets of the Third World developing in the United States, Noam Chomsky draws parallels between the genocide of colonial times and the murder and exploitation associated with modern-day imperialism.

The Colossus of Maroussi

The Colossus of Maroussi

The author's quest for spiritual renewal is illuminated in descriptions of his impressions of Greece and its people

Automats, Taxi Dances, and Vaudeville

Excavating Manhattan's Lost Places of Leisure

Automats, Taxi Dances, and Vaudeville

Explores the architecture of New York City focusing on the hidden monuments to its nightlife, including the Lincoln Theater, Atlantic German beer hall, and Union square's American Mutoscope and Biograph Company.

The New Colossus (Statue of Liberty Poem)

The New Colossus (Statue of Liberty Poem)

Perform this script about the struggles a Russian and an Italian immigrant face as they strive to enter America.

Writers on the Air

Conversations about Books

Writers on the Air

Culled from Donna Seaman’s Chicago radio program, Open Books, this collection of interviews highlights Seaman's in-depth conversations with writers of literary fiction and creative nonfiction. A wide range of topics are discussed, including writers' inspiration, their favorite books, their working and research habits, and their opinion of the state of literature today. An introductory essay accompanies each interview and provides a brief biographical and critical discussion of the author's background and work. Interviews with Margaret Atwood, T. C. Boyle, Sandra Cisneros, Jamaica Kincaid, Chang-rae Lee, Alice McDermott, and Joyce Carol Oates are among those included.