Cocaine Obsession

What's Your Perception

Cocaine Obsession

Cocaine Obsession will explore the nature of and perception of cocaine in its native land prior to European exploitation, its importation to North America (as well as its initial popularity), its prohibition in North America, triggers/withdrawals/health risks and where cocaine is today. I plan to explore Cocaine's migration in 2006 via self-reported interviews with individuals whom are chronic users (either socially or on-going). My desire is that you, the reader, ask yourself this one question as you read this report: if cocaine had and continues to have medicinal purposes, termed as a Schedule #2 Drug, what deems cocaine to be a "bad drug" in North America? What is your perception of cocaine?

The Emergence of Crack Cocaine Abuse

The Emergence of Crack Cocaine Abuse

Cocaine was once considered the elite's drug, with a price so high that only the very wealthy could afford it, and thought by many to be 'safe'. But during the 1980s, a dangerous and cheap derivative began appearing on the street. This drug, crack, is a cocaine free-base produced relatively safely and easily. Because of its low production costs, crack became popular among the lower classes, leading to an epidemic in the late 1980s, with estimates that over one million people used crack cocaine. The drug's name became synonymous with gangs, crime, and violence. Because of the intensity and apparent suddenness of the crack crisis, people began to wonder if there were any warning signs public officials missed and how exactly crack spread across the nation. Some even floated the theory that agencies like the CIA and FBI encouraged the use of crack in inner cities. No matter where it came from, crack is a menace that, though no longer 'epidemic', must be combated along with all other illegal drugs. This book makes a close examination of the development, responses to, and effect of the crack cocaine crisis in the United States. Included are descriptions of cocaine, crack, and the free-basing process. Also examined are the health questions surrounding the abuse problems and the allegations that governmental authorities had advance knowledge of crack. With the war on drugs a perpetual and critical battle in America, the facts and analyses presented here are of paramount importance to the understanding of a major issue of society's safety.

Cocaine Changes

The Experience of Using and Quitting

Cocaine Changes

"In an arena of public policy where misinformation and disinformation reigns, ... facts are desperately needed, and Cocaine Changes gives us a bucketful of them. Anyone who values rationality and is concerned about the harmful efforts of our misbegotten drug policy should read this book." ?Ira Glasser, Executive Director, ACLU"I know of no other book that offers so much information on the subject so clearly and calmly presented. For anyone interested in the natural history of cocaine use in America now, Cocaine Changes provides the best, most comprehensive available resource." ?Lester Grinspoon, M.D., Harvard Medical School "This book puts the cocaine scare of the 1980s to the test and places cocaine in a more realistic perspective. By examining the lives of hundreds of heavy users, it discovers that even among this group, cocaine use is not always cocaine abuse." ?Kevin B. Zeese, Drug Policy Foundation "This provocative study challenges many of the prevailing myths about cocaine and crack use, and is essential reading for any researchers, educators, policymakers, law enforcement personnel, or concerned citizens who wish to make informed judgments." ?Patricia G. Erickson, Ph.D., Head, Drug Policy Research Program (Canada) "This book puts the cocaine scare of the 1980s to the test and places cocaine in a more realistic perspective. By examining the lives of hundreds of heavy users, it discovers that even among this group, cocaine use is not always cocaine abuse." ?Kevin B. Zeese, Vice-President and Counsel, Drug Policy Foundation

Cocaine and Heroin Trafficking in the Caribbean

The Case of Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica and Guyana

Cocaine and Heroin Trafficking in the Caribbean

Cocaine and Heroin Trafficking in the Caribbean exposes the nature and structures of illicit drug trafficking in the Caribbean. A complex reality is presented which is built upon the lies and deceptions of the war on drugs, the complicity of the elites of the Caribbean with the illicit trade and the failure of the agencies charged with interdicting the illicit trade in the Caribbean. The escalating levels of societal violence, instability, of crime and the stark contrasts of opulence in the midst of grinding poverty all linked to the illicit drug trade are dealt with. The underlying reality of failed states that facilitate illicit drug trafficking in the Caribbean with a future of violence and instability is the dominant reality of the Caribbean in the 21st century exposed and explained in this text.

Cocaine

Global Histories

Cocaine

Cocaine examines the rise and fall of this notorious substance from its legitimate use by scientists and medics in the nineteenth century to the international prohibitionist regimes and drug gangs of today. Themes explored include: * Amsterdam's complex cocaine culture * the manufacture, sale and control of cocaine in the United States * Japan and the Southeast Asian cocaine industry * export of cocaine prohibitions to Peru * sex, drugs and race in early modern London Cocaine unveils new primary sources and covert social, cultural and political transformations to shed light on cocaine's hidden history.

Cocaine

Coke and the War on Drugs

Cocaine

Describes the dangers of using cocaine, discussing the various effects it has on the human body and its impact on society.

Cocaine Solutions

Help for Cocaine Abusers and Their Families

Cocaine Solutions

Although the media focus on the rise of cocaine use and the evils of its abuse, the public receives little real information about the scope of the problem and its treatment. This timely, practical, and honest volume gets to the heart of the cocaine addiction problem. Cocaine Solutions not only addresses the difficulties experienced by addicts and their families in coping with the devastating financial, emotional, and psychological toll that addiction takes, it also identifies specific sources of help that exist for addicts and their families. Both recovered drug addicts themselves, the authors discuss some of the obstacles to recovery and the ways to overcome them. Cocaine Solutions includes the stories of recovering addicts to illustrate firsthand what addicts’lives are like, giving you a better understanding of the people who are afflicted with the disease of addiction. This important book is required reading for a wide audience--cocaine addicts, potential addicts, the families of addicted or potentially addicted persons, professionals who see addiction daily in their patients, and anyone who is interested in the problem of cocaine addiction.

Entering Adulthood

Examining Drugs and Risks : a Curriculum for Grades 9-12

Entering Adulthood

This curriculum guide for high-school students presents in-depth coverage of the full range of content related to drugs, including tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, narcotics, and hallucinogens. It is part of a series designed to provide educators with the curricular tools necessary to challenge students to take personal responsibility for their health. In addition to the abundance of subject matter content, this 11-lesson curriculum unit involves students in activities that enhance decision-making, problem-solving, and coping skills and helps them develop effective personnal strategies for resisting drug use. The well-developed lessons are designed to give teachers the flexibility to choose, modify, and combine the appropriate content for students. This guide fits within a comprehensive health education program; provides extensive content on commonly abused drugs; explores the legal issues involved in drug use; examines the personal and social costs of drug use; stimulates critical thinking and motivates high school students toward health behavior; and identifies community and school resources that provide counseling, rehabilitation and treatment services for drug users. The lessons include the objective; class time required; a brief overview of the topic; instructional strategies; teacher materials and preparation; procedures; key points; and evaluation materials. A separately bound student workbook contains identical exercises and activities for students as those found in the teacher's guide. (ABL)