Clinical Neuropsychology of Alcoholism

Clinical Neuropsychology of Alcoholism

Alcohol abuse is a major health problem in most parts of the world. This book focuses on the way in which alcohol affects the brain, with the aim of describing advances in the neuropsychology of alcoholism in a way that makes this work accessible to clinicians from a variety of backgrounds who treat people with alcohol-related problems.; The book is divided into four parts. Part One provides an introduction to the medical and neurological conditions that can result from alcoholism, and to the process of neuropsychological assessment. The problems involved in conducting research in this area are also considered. In Part Two, research that focuses directly on changes to the nervous system is surveyed. This includes studies of both the short-term and the chronic neurological changes in the brain caused by alcohol. In Part Three, studies of the neuropsychological effects of acute intoxication, social drinking and alcohol abuse are described. Finally, in Part Four, the implications of neuropsychological research for the assessment and management of patients with alcohol problems are considered. The objective of this book is to collate the range of research work that is relevant to understanding how alcohol affects the brain. This includes both the acute and the chronic effects, at both the biological and physiological levels.

Foundations of Clinical Neuropsychology

Foundations of Clinical Neuropsychology

In the last decade, neuropsychology has grown from a small subspecialty to a major component in the practice of clinical and medical psychology. This growth has been caused by advances in psychological testing (such as the Halstead-Reitan neuropsychological battery, as discussed in Chapter 5) that have made evaluation techniques in the field available to a wider audience, by advances in neuroradiol ogy and related medical areas that have enabled us to better understand the struc ture and function of the brain in living individuals without significant potential harm to those individuals, and by increased interest by psychologists and other scientists in the role that the brain plays in determining behavior. Many disorders that were believed by many to be caused purely by learning or environment have been shown to relate, at least in some cases, to brain dysfunction or damage. With the growth of the field, there has been increased interest in the work of neuropsychologists by many who are not in the field.

Practitioner’s Guide to Clinical Neuropsychology

Practitioner’s Guide to Clinical Neuropsychology

The author has written an easily accessible summary of neuropsychological tests, neuropsychiatric disorders, and the relationships of test performance to disorder and treatment strategy. This ready reference provides neuropsychologists with an understanding of the medical context within which neuropsychological evaluation and psychosocial therapy takes place.

The Neuropsychology of Cortical Dementias

The Neuropsychology of Cortical Dementias

"This book provides an overview of the cognitive and behavioral profiles of the cortical dementias in a readable and clinically relevant manner. Its emphasis on disease entities primarily affecting cortical structures allows for a more comprehensive description of the latest insights into the pathogenesis and assessment of a number of different disease processes... Weighted Numerical Score: 98 - 5 Stars!" Melissa Jones, MD (University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine) Doody's Medical Reviews The Neuropsychology of Cortical Dementias addresses in depth the neuropsychological impact and features of the full range of cortical dementias. It examines the differential neuropathological and pathophysiological bases of these dementias and emphasizes their behavioral and cognitive aspects in assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. The book also presents the most advanced techniques and strategies for disease-specific treatment. Important legal/ethical issues and the role of caregivers in treating dementia patients are also covered. Featuring contributions from such diverse disciplines as neuropsychology, neurology, psychiatry, and clinical psychology, this volume provides a broad interdisciplinary perspective for practicing clinical neuropsychologists, neurologists, psychiatrists, gerontologists, and psychologists who work with patients with dementia. Key Features: Includes comprehensive, clinically focused coverage of all major cortical dementias Covers neuroanatomy, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and management of dementia patients, as well as legal and ethical issues Discusses assessment and diagnosis from the perspectives of neuroimaging and cognitive and behavioral symptoms Discusses a range of interventions (pharmacological, cognitive behavioral, etc.) and management issues related to dementia treatment Informed by contributions from such diverse disciplines as neuropsychology, neurology, psychiatry, and clinical psychology

Alcohol and the Adult Brain

Alcohol and the Adult Brain

The research literature on the impact of alcohol on the brain has seen a rapid expansion in recent years. Alcohol and the Adult Brain presents an up-to-date overview of some of the issues relevant to understanding and working with people with cognitive impairment as a result of chronic alcohol use. One issue causing barriers to effective treatment and care is the stigma associated with alcohol dependence, resulting in the belief that difficulties associated with alcohol related brain damage (ARBD) are ‘self-inflicted’. Cognitive changes resulting from alcohol excess and poor nutrition can directly affect an individual’s ability to motivate themselves, make decisions, and make the informed choices that underlie behaviour change. Attitudes held by professionals, reinforced by societal norms, that a person is ‘choosing to drink’ and ‘not motivated to engage with treatment’, in combination with the often subtle cognitive deficits associated with ARBD, can result in a lack of timely intervention, with enormous personal, social and economic cost. The chapters in this book set ARBD in a social and cultural context, provide discussion of the difficulties in definition and diagnosis, and outline the structural brain changes and neuropsychological deficits associated with chronic alcohol use. The book provides an overview of recent research on ARBD, including impairments associated with Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome, and discusses up to date recommendations for managing and working with this complex and varied disorder. Alcohol and the Adult Brain will be essential for students and researchers working with ARBD and for practitioners in a range of health, social care and voluntary settings.

Alcohol and Alcoholism

Effects on Brain and Development

Alcohol and Alcoholism

This is the first volume that focuses on the lifespan neurobehavioral factors likely to determine susceptibility to alcohol abuse and its consequences. The chapters offer careful analysis of the effects of ethanol on the fetus, the infant, the adolescent, and the adult. The authors include behavioral neuroscientists and clinical neuropsychologists. Their topics range from the neurochemical and neuroanatomical consequences of prenatal alcohol to the cognitive consequences of prenatal alcohol on preschool and school-age children. The impact of genetics on sensitivity to alcohol is considered in terms of analytic tests using techniques of behavioral genetics and molecular biology. The consequences of exposure to alcohol during breastfeeding are described in experiments with human infants. The alcoholism that develops in adulthood is analyzed through the experimental study of relapse from alcohol deprivation and assessment of neuropsychological impairments and treatment for alcoholics. Drawing on extensive research that has applied techniques from molecular neurobiology and tests of learning and memory to the clinical assessment and treatment of alcoholics. The volume answers recent questions raised by the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the National Institute of Drug Abuse about the role of early experience in susceptibility to later abuse of alcohol and other drugs. Although epidemiological studies can describe the problem, solutions in terms of mechanisms that mediate these effects will be found only with the kinds of experimentally oriented approaches the chapter authors describe.

Comprehensive Handbook of Psychopathology

Comprehensive Handbook of Psychopathology

The purpose of this handbook, originally published in 1984, was to provide a compreh- sive review of current clinical descriptions, research , and theories of psychopathology. Descriptive psychopathology is a ?eld that forms the foundation of clinical practice and research in clinical psychology, psychiatry, psychiatric social work, psychiatric nursing, and allied professions in mental health. Since the 1st edition, the editors have devised and updated a handbook to cover both general and speci?c topics in psychopathology that would be useful to researchers, practitioners, and graduate or other advanced students in the mental health and behavioral medicine professions. To implement this plan, we have very carefully chosen colleagues whom we respect for their expertise in particular ?elds. These authors include both clinicians and researchers who have outstanding national reputations, as well as more junior behavioral scientists and clinicians who, in our opinion, will achieve similar recognition in the future. The excellent chapters in this book lead us to believe that we have chosen wisely. We would like to express our appreciation to these authors for their outstanding contributions and cooperation.

Developments in Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology

Developments in Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology

The chapters published in this volume developed from presentations, and their associated discussions at a conference organised by the Scottish Branch of the British Psychological Society, held at Rothesay, Isle of Bute, Scotland in September 1987. The goal of the conference was to bring together workers across a wide area of neuropsychological research to discuss recent technological advances, developments in assessment and rehabilitation, and to address theoretical issues of current interest. Thus, the chapters in this book include contributions on the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography in neuropsychological research, studies of hemi spheric specialisation and cooperation, alcoholic and Alzheimer type dementia, prosopagnosia and facial processing, the assessment, management and rehabilitation of memory problems, the assessment of premorbid intellectual status and issues in developmental neuropsychology. Many of those engaged in research and clinical practice in neuropsychology encounter a range of topic at least as wide as this in their professional lives. The opportunity for researchers and clinicians to discuss some of the key issues in the field was invaluable and we hope that readers gain as much from the material presented here as the participants did from the meeting itself.

The Rehabilitation of Cognitive Disabilities

The Rehabilitation of Cognitive Disabilities

The rehabilitation of intellectual impairment resulting from brain injury has become a major professional activity of clinical neuropsychologists. In recent years, neuropsychology has developed from a professional role stressing assessment and diagnosis to one that now includes treatment and rehabilitation activities. Such trends are also manifested in two new research interests of neuropsychologists: the study of the generalizability of neuropsychological test findings to everyday abilities, often referred to as the "ecological validity" of tests, and outcome studies of cognitive retraining treatments. Discovering the relationships between traditional neuropsychological tests and everyday behavior is important because the referral questions posed to neuropsychologists have changed. Now, the neuropsychologist is asked to comment on the patient's functional intellectual abilities as they relate to the everyday demands of home, work and educational settings. Of course, the development of cognitive retraining theory and procedures allows neuropsychologists to intervene in the treatment of the cognitive problems that the neuropsychological evaluation has documented. Since these approaches are still in their formative stages, they have been the subject of clinical lore, great controversy and little systematic research. This situation prompted one of our presenters to lament, "Either you believe Cognitive Retraining is divinly inspired, or the work of the devil. " There is apparently little middle ground. Given this state of affairs, the program committee of the Mid-South Conference on Human Neuropsychology decided to focus on the role of neuropsychologists in rehabilitation.