Bronx D.A.

True Stories from the Sex Crimes and Domestic Violence Unit

Bronx D.A.

A dramatic memoir by a former prosecutor in the Domestic Violence and Sex Crimes Unit of the Bronx District Attorney's office describes the personal beliefs that led her to pursue a career combating crimes against women and children, the political and emotional battles that compromised her psychological health, and her eventual decision to change careers.

Wild Cowboys

Urban Marauders & the Forces of Order

Wild Cowboys

Follows the extraordinary efforts of police officers, detectives, and prosecutors to bring to justice a murderous gang of Dominican youths known as the Wild Cowboys, and the social activists, liberal judges, and politicians who stood in their way. UP.

Bronx Requiem

A Novel

Bronx Requiem

The death of Paco "Packy" Johnson shouldn't have surprised anyone. Paco Johnson spent a lifetime in the system -- starting in juvie at age 10, then prison for most of his adult life. But he managed to make some real friends in prison, friends who helped him get parole, a place to stay, and plans to help him adjust to a life outside prison after seventeen years behind bars. But only seventeen hours after he was released, he was found dead -- murdered -- in the streets of the Bronx. James Beck can't save Packy any longer -- but he can try to find out what happened to Packy, and why, and exact a measure of justice. Beck, ringleader of a tight clique of ex-cons based in Brooklyn's Red Hook section, is determined to accord Packy at least some dignity and a measure of justice. But what drove Packy out onto the streets of the Bronx his first night back? Who did he run into that hated him enough to viciously beat him before executing him, and yet left behind his wallet full of cash? But what at first appears to be a simple, if tragic, street killing, quickly becomes something much more difficult and complex. And it will take all the skills, connections, and cunning of Beck and his team not only to learn the truth but to survive the forces they've unwittingly unleashed.

Bronx Requiem

A Detective Jack Kenny Mystery

Bronx Requiem

The NYPD has a secret they'd like to keep in the past. Detective Jack Kenny doesn't like keeping secrets. Conservative, stubborn, and frustrated by institutional red tape, Detective Jack Kenny solves crimes the old-fashioned way. If there's anything that thirty-plus years in the NYPD--or being born into a family of Irish Catholic cops--teaches you, it's that good police officers need little more than a badge, a six-shot revolver, and some seasoned street smarts to get the answers they need. Kenny's partner, the young, beautiful, and technologically savvy Carmen Romero, believes that computers--not hunches--are the key to identifying and catching today's toughest criminals. Together, Kenny and Romero make a pairing as fiery as it is effective. But when a new witness to the grisly, thirty-year-old "Bronx Barber" murder comes forward, linking the brutal slashing of a prostitute with an NYPD stag party gone wild, the duo's skills and loyalties are put to the test like never before. Suddenly, Jack's long-deceased first partner is implicated in the crime, and an unpaid debt drives the veteran detective to get to the heart of a secret that the NYPD would prefer to leave in its past. With pressure escalating and time running out, Kenny and Romero's frantic search for truth will put their careers, reputations, and lives at stake. Along the way, they'll learn just how strong the ties that bind New York's Finest really are.

Staff Studies and Surveys

Supporting Materials for the Report

Staff Studies and Surveys


From Jailer to Jailed

My Journey from Correction and Police Commissioner to Inmate #84888-054

From Jailer to Jailed

The controversial New York City police commissioner and New York Times bestselling author of The Lost Son shares the story of his fall from grace and the effects of his incarceration on his views of the American justice system. Bernard Kerik was New York City’s police commissioner during the 9/11 attacks, and became an American hero as he led the NYPD through rescue and recovery efforts of the World Trade Center. His résumé as a public servant is long and storied, and includes receiving a Medal of Honor. In 2004, Kerik was nominated by George W. Bush to head the Department of Homeland Security. Now, he is a former Federal Prison Inmate known as #84888-054. Convicted of tax fraud and false statements in 2007, Kerik was sentenced to four years in federal prison. Now, for the first time, he talks candidly about what it was like on the inside: the torture of solitary confinement, the abuse of power, the mental and physical torment of being locked up in a cage, the powerlessness. With newfound perspective, Kerik makes a plea for change and illuminates why our punishment system doesn’t always fit the crime. In this extraordinary memoir, Kerik reveals his unprecedented view of the American penal system from both sides: as the jailer and the jailed. With astonishing candor, bravery, and insider’s intelligence, Bernard Kerik shares his fall from grace to incarceration, and turns it into a genuine and uniquely insightful argument for criminal justice reform.

Gangbusters

How a Street Tough, Elite Homicide Unit Took Down New York's Most Dangerous Gang

Gangbusters

An elite homicide investigation unit takes on one of the most savage and destructive gangs in New York City history in this gritty true-crime narrative. The investigation into the late-night murder of a college student on the West Side Highway leads to the Wild Cowboys, a group of young men who for years terrorized Upper Manhattan and the Bronx while running a $30,000-a-day drug business. What follows is a tale of dogged pursuit that offers a fascinating inside look at the workings of a complex police investigation, and a satisfying account of how a city took back its streets. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Driving While Black

Highways, Shopping Malls, Taxi Cabs, Sidewalks: How to Fight Back if You Are a Victim of Racial Profiling

Driving While Black

A practical handbook for people who want to be safe and do something. Racial profiling does happen. And while cases where victims find themselves looking down the barrel of a policeman's gun make the six o'clock news, dozens of less extreme, yet troubling, examples occur every day. Cabs that whiz by only to be seen stopping for "safer"-looking people just up the block; being asked for multiple pieces of identification when making purchases with credit cards; being followed around a department store by salespeople and security while never being asked if they need any assistance; being detained for hours and extensively searched in an airport or train station--Driving While Black clearly defines the system officially known as CARD (class, age, race, dress) and offers advice about how to handle potentially life-threatening situations with the police, as well as recourse for readers who suspect their civil rights have been denied due to racial profiling. A book written to save lives, Driving While Black is not just for people of color, but for anyone who likes to wear a baseball cap, baggy jeans, sneakers, and a tee shirt and finds they are often treated like a "suspect."

Zero Tolerance

Quality of Life and the New Police Brutality in New York City

Zero Tolerance

Essays addressing police brutality connect increasing brutality by white New York City police officers, community grassroots activism, and the daily violence sparking the city's campaign to police the quality of life.

Montezuma's Man

Montezuma's Man

The Justice Department hires Sidel’s new chauffer to spy on the New York Police Department’s commissionerJoey Barbarossa likes being a cop, because it makes dealing drugs easier. Any time a fellow pusher gives him trouble, Joey’s detective badge and police-issue Glock have a way of making the problem disappear. He’s also protected by his mentor, NYPD Commissioner Isaac Sidel, but there’s nothing even Sidel can do when Barbarossa makes the mistake of rubbing out a dealer with ties to the Justice Department. For compensation, Justice demands Barbarossa start spying on Sidel, who’s just made him his personal chauffer. The drug-dealing detective can’t say no. Sidel is preparing for a run at the mayor’s office, but before his campaign kicks off he has to deal with two mob bosses who want him dead. He and Barbarossa don ski masks and start holding up mafia establishments, but as the pressure rises and the friendship frays, the only question is which cop will turn on the other first.