Breaking the Patterns of Depression

Breaking the Patterns of Depression

Twenty to thirty million Americans suffer from some form of diagnosable depression, and their ranks are growing. Psychologist Michael D. Yapko explains that in order to find relief, more than the current episode of depression must be examined. In Breaking the Patterns of Depression, he presents skills that enable readers to understand and ultimately avert depression's recurring cycles. Focusing on future prevention as well as initial treatment, the book includes over one hundred structured activities to help sufferers learn the skills necessary to become and remain depression-free. Breaking the Patterns of Depression begins by translating the clinical literature on psychotherapy and antidepressant medication into language that can be used to enhance an understanding of depression, and to personalize individual cures. Yapko uses a conversational, anecdotal tone that encourages readers to take an active approach to helping themselves. Special sections entitled "Learn by Doing" and "Shifting Perspectives" help develop the skills necessary to manage difficult experiences. Readers learn how to solve problems effectively, anticipate the likely consequences of their actions, think and act in a direct, goal-oriented fashion, balance different areas of their lives, and use self-knowledge to stay out of harmful situations. More realistic and helpful than other depression-management books on the market, Breaking the Patterns of Depression defines what causes depression and, best of all, clarifies what can be done about it. With this knowledge in hand, readers can control their depression, rather than having depression control them.

Depression Is Contagious

How the Most Common Mood Disorder Is Spreading Around the World and How to Stop It

Depression Is Contagious

Depression is the world’s most common mood disorder, and it is spreading like a viral contagion. You can’t catch depression in the same way you catch a cold, but the latest research provides overwhelming support that moods spread through social conditions, defining depression as more a social problem than a medical illness. Our social lives directly shape our brain chemistry and powerfully affect the way we think and feel—and our brains can change for the better with healthy social circumstances as much as they can change with medication. Drugs may address some of depression’s symptoms, but Dr. Yapko convincingly argues that we need to treat depression at its root, by building social skills and improving relationships, in order to halt the spread of this debilitating disorder. Filled with practical exercises and illustrative examples, his groundbreaking plan guides readers to identify key social patterns that reinforce depression so they can learn the skills to overcome depression and even prevent new episodes from occurring. Provocative and controversial as well as prescriptive and hopeful, Depression Is Contagious investigates the social phenomenon of depression’s epidemic-like spread while offering a more realistic road to recovery.

Breaking the Back of Depression

Breaking the Back of Depression

Jackie Osinski takes us on her own personal struggle, heartaches and devastations of dealing with depression. The book opens as Jackie is a seven-year-old child trying to deal with an abusive home life. She candidly points out the harrowing feelings of being a small child, wanting to plunge a knife through her chest. She continues the journey with the successive years of depression and her many attempts at suicide. She feebly attempts to find some sort of healing and resolve. As the book progresses, we find a young woman haunted by the demonic forces of depression. It is only several years later when the Word of God is revealed to her in a dynamic new way, that she is able to find complete and total freedom. The reader is given tools to be set free from depression and help others find the same hope, peace and freedom. Jackie Osinski is an author, conference speaker and evangelist. As a former pastor, she has counseled many who have suffered from depression and suicide. Her passion is to see the oppressed set free. She is on a journey to bring hope, healing and freedom to millions. Having suffered from depression and suicide for over 20 years, Jackie sought answers to be set free. After 20 years of seeking every possible avenue, she discovered the power to overcome and be totally set free. Jackie then set out on a course to help others. Through many years as a counselor, conference speaker and pastor, she has used these same tools to set many free.

Suggestions of Abuse

Suggestions of Abuse


The Noonday Demon

An Atlas Of Depression

The Noonday Demon

With uncommon humanity, candor, wit, and erudition, award-winning author Andrew Solomon takes the reader on a journey of incomparable range and resonance into the most pervasive of family secrets. His contribution to our understanding not only of mental illness but also of the human condition is truly stunning. The Noonday Demon examines depression in personal, cultural, and scientific terms. Drawing on his own struggles with the illness and interviews with fellow sufferers, doctors and scientists, policymakers and politicians, drug designers and philosophers, Solomon reveals the subtle complexities and sheer agony of the disease. He confronts the challenge of defining the illness and describes the vast range of available medications, the efficacy of alternative treatments, and the impact the malady has had on various demographic populations around the world and throughout history. He also explores the thorny patch of moral and ethical questions posed by emerging biological explanations for mental illness. The depth of human experience Solomon chronicles, the range of his intelligence, and his boundless curiosity and compassion will change the reader's view of the world.

Mindfulness and Hypnosis: The Power of Suggestion to Transform Experience

Mindfulness and Hypnosis: The Power of Suggestion to Transform Experience

Winner of the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis (SCEH) Arthur Shapiro Award for Best Book on Hypnosis, this book explores how mindfulness and hypnosis in a clinical context work to help foster change. In recent years mindfulness has become integrated into many clinicians' private practices, and become a staple of hospital and university based treatment programs for stress reduction, pain, anxiety management, and a host of other difficulties. Clinicians are now routinely encouraging their clients to focus, be aware, open, and accepting, and thereby derive benefit from the mindfulness experience. How has mindfulness, a treatment tool that might easily have been dismissed as esoteric only a few short years ago, become so widely accepted and applied? One obvious answer: Because it works. The empirical foundation documenting the therapeutic merits of mindfulness is already substantial and is still growing. This is not a book about documenting the therapeutic merits of mindfulness, however. Rather, this book is the first of its kind to address how and most importantly why guided mindfulness meditations can enhance treatment. The focus in this book is on the structure of guided mindfulness meditations and, especially, the role of suggestion in these processes. Specifically, one of the primary questions addressed in this book is this: When a psychotherapist conducts guided mindfulness meditations (GMMs) for some clinical purpose, how does mindfulness work? In posing this question other questions arise that are every bit as compelling: Do GMMs contain structural elements that can be identified and amplified and thereby employed more efficiently? How do we determine who is most likely to benefit from such methods? Can GMMs be improved by adapting them to the needs of specific individuals rather than employing scripted "one size fits all" approaches? Discussing the role of suggestion in experience and offering the author's concrete suggestions for integrating this work into psychotherapy, this book is a practical guide to hypnosis, focusing, and mindfulness for the clinician.

Hypnosis and Treating Depression

Applications in Clinical Practice

Hypnosis and Treating Depression

Michael Yapko’s seminal 1992 book, Hypnosis and the Treatment of Depressions, was the first book ever written on the subject of applying hypnosis in the treatment of depressed individuals. Since its publication, Yapko’s work has not only withstood the test of colleagues previously dismissive of the merits of hypnosis as a tool of treatment, but has thrived in the face of it. Hypnosis and Treating Depression diversifies the range of topics to consider and increases the number of knowledgeable contributors on the subject of treating depression with hypnosis. The book features chapter contributions by highly experienced and well-known experts on using hypnosis to treat specific forms of depression, with assessment and intervention strategies as well as sample transcripts of the use of hypnosis in therapy sessions. It discusses both broad and targeted applications of hypnosis in treatment, the treatment of depression with hypnosis in special populations, as well as special considerations regarding hypnotic treatment. As a practical guidebook for clinicians looking to add to their treatment protocols, Hypnosis and Treating Depression: Applications in Clinical Practice provides an updated and comprehensive volume on therapeutic uses of hypnosis in the treatment of depression.

Encyclopedia of Information Ethics and Security

Encyclopedia of Information Ethics and Security

Rapid technological advancement has given rise to new ethical dilemmas and security threats, while the development of appropriate ethical codes and security measures fail to keep pace, which makes the education of computer users and professionals crucial. The Encyclopedia of Information Ethics and Security is an original, comprehensive reference source on ethical and security issues relating to the latest technologies. Covering a wide range of themes, this valuable reference tool includes topics such as computer crime, information warfare, privacy, surveillance, intellectual property and education. This encyclopedia is a useful tool for students, academics, and professionals.

A Broken Therapist¡¦S Guide to Completeness

A Broken Therapist¡¦S Guide to Completeness

In A Broken Therapists Guide to Completeness, Mark Vegh explains how so many of us live with a fragmented perspective due to hurts and traumas of the past. We try to hide from our pain or push it away, but it only makes us rigid, cautious, and defensive. Or rather we stew on the past bumps and bruises, becoming resentful and bitter. Vegh uses the funny, the serious, and the irreverent to show you the wizard behind the curtain of moving beyond crisis, a little concept that encapsulates the things he found that worksits called dialectics.

Breaking the Mother-Son Dynamic

Resetting the Patterns of a Man's Life and Loves

Breaking the Mother-Son Dynamic

Therapists and the general public are familiar with the terms "(s)mothering," "helicopter moms," and "boomerang sons" because they have been popularized in films like Monster in Law, Cyrus and Failure to Launch—but what makes for humorous fodder onscreen depicts a troubling issue that's being played out for real in therapists' offices, bedrooms, and divorce courts across the nation: an epidemic of men who are enmeshed in unhealthy, energy-sucking, and emasculating relationships with their mothers. Even though these men are grown and living away from Mom, her influence has left them unable to fully commit or to fully love, and they are plagued with anger issues, indecisiveness, depression, or toxic stress. In Breaking the Mother-Son Dynamic, John Lee takes an eye-opening look at how a mother's love or lack thereof impacts a son's life choices and life partner or lovers. Perhaps you are one of these men (or maybe you recognize these behaviors in the man you love). Do you hold back, swallow, or bottle up things you wish you could say to your mother for fear it would upset or "kill" her? Did you grow up hearing negative things about men, masculinity, being a male, and how you shouldn't be like 'the rest of them'? Does your mother, or did she, fail to respect your boundaries as a child, adolescent, or adult? Does your mother keep referring to you as her "baby" or her "little boy" even after you became an adult? If you answered "yes" to any of these questions, you may be caught in an unhealthy mother-son dynamic that is negatively affecting key areas of your life. Several years ago, John Lee wrote what came to be the most authoritative book on why men run from relationships, The Flying Boy: Healing the Wounded Man. Here, he visits the mother-son relationship and gently but assertively shows men how to separate from the mother energy that has a massive pull on their hearts and souls, no matter how young or old they may be. In a work that is a combination of memoir, self-help psychology, recovery and personal growth, he discovers: why a relationship of 50-50 responsibility doesn't work, and what does work; how men can stop "sonning" mothers, lovers, and wives; why one must learn his or her own "rhythm of closeness"; how to be really present to those we love and to life itself; and much, much more. Using case studies, personal stories, and assessments, the book helps men release any anger and grief toward their mothers and teaches them how to take responsibility for their adult selves; most importantly, Lee provides an understanding of what healthy adults should—and shouldn't—expect from each other. Lee shows wives and girlfriends how to stop being their man's surrogate mother and shows well-meaning mothers how certain behaviors may perpetuate an unhealthy cycle and how to better relate to their sons in healthier ways. By helping mothers and sons identify this dynamic and providing them with the tools to dismantle it, this book will change lives. For anyone who is ready to make a clean, clear, and guilt-free separation from the kind of (s)mothering and "sonning" that just hasn't worked, John Lee will show them the way.