Birth Trauma

"This... book explains everything you and your family and friends need to know about birth trauma :what causes it, how it affects your personal relationships, how to treat it and where to find support.

Birth Trauma

Birth ought to be a joyful experience: for some women, however, it is anything but. Women who have experienced a medical emergency during birth often find that the memory of it doesn't go away just because a healthy baby has been delivered. They experience the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder: flashbacks, sleeplessness, nightmares or extreme anxiety. Some go out of their way to avoid being reminded of the birth, and they may find it difficult to bond with their baby. Post-traumatic stress disorder after birth, known more simply as 'birth trauma', affects at least 10,000 women every year in England and Wales. Yet the condition is poorly misunderstood and women suffering from birth trauma often do not receive the treatment or support they need. They may be misdiagnosed as suffering from postnatal depression, and many find that friends and family, instead of being supportive, simply tell them to pull themselves together. This valuable and fascinating book explains everything you and your family and friends need to know about birth trauma: what causes it, how it affects your personal relationships, how to treat it and where to find support. Using the powerful personal stories of women who have suffered birth trauma and overcome it, this book shows that it is possible to go through this difficult experience and come out the other side. A percentage of all royalties is donated to charity.

Coping with Birth Trauma and Postnatal Depression

It is possible to recover from birth trauma, but, in order to recover from it you first
have to recognize it and admit it. It's not a widely known condition. It's not
something your midwife is likely to ask about, and it's not something your friends
are ...

Coping with Birth Trauma and Postnatal Depression

Children are wonderful. That's why we have them. But what about the negative feelings that are the flip side of motherhood? When you are bruised, battered or worse after the birth, and feel that life has been reduced to a cycle of feeding and changing; of lonely days and endless nights? As many as 3 in 10 new mothers are affected by depression, so you are not alone - this book is written to help cope you with these feelings, and to enable you to make a happy and successful adjustment to motherhood. It will give you advice on how to come to terms with a traumatic birth and help you understand what postnatal depression is - and isn't. You can learn to love your baby, even if you're struggling to bond, and you can also come to terms with the new dynamics within your family and your relationship with your partner as you adjust to a different world, with a changed body and new priorities. You can't change society and its often-unrealistic expectations of motherhood, but with the help offered in this book you can come to feel more confident in your new role, and in your love for your baby.

Birth Trauma and Perinatal Brain Damage

Abstract Differences between a birth trauma as disease and patrimonial traumatic
injuries of mechanical character (pathological processes) are stated. It is
necessary to distinguish a birth trauma from labor traumatic injuries. If this is not
done, ...

Birth Trauma and Perinatal Brain Damage

This book focuses on traumatic birth injuries, predominantly of the skull and brain, as well as hemorrhagic and ischemic disorders of cerebral circulation in fetuses and newborns, providing information on each condition’s classification, incidence, etiology and pathogenesis, pathomorphology, clinic, diagnostics, prognosis, and complications. It discusses the configuration (molding) of the head, venous congestion, displacements of cranial bones, ruptures of the cerebellar tentorium during labor, and the compression of the skull and brain damage caused by obstetric operations and asynclitic insertion of the head, while also describing the importance of the periosteal stagnation of the skull to assess the delivery and explanation of tentorium tears. Intracranial hemorrhages are considered in detail, taking into account the role of the traumatic factor in their occurrence and hypoxic-ischemic brain lesions (periventricular leukomalacia, selective neuronal necrosis, multicystic encephalomalacia, etc.). Lastly, it offers the world’s first explanation of why tentorium tears occur most frequently in the left half, providing an original classification of damaged tentoria, subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhages, and the degree of configuration of the head in childbirth. Given the depth and breadth of its coverage, the book offers an essential resource for neonatologists, obstetricians-gynecologists, perinatologists, pediatric neurologists, pathologists, pediatricians, forensic experts and neuroimaging professionals.

Why Birth Trauma Matters

WHO recommendations: intrapartum care for a positive childbirth experience.
Geneva: World Health Organization. Chapter 1: What is Trauma? American
Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental
disorders ...

Why Birth Trauma Matters

When we think about trauma and PTSD we tend to think about war and conflict. But around a third of women feel some part of their birth was traumatic. This experience can impact on their mental and physical health, their relationships and future plans. In Why Birth Trauma Matters, Dr Emma Svanberg, clinical psychologist and co-founder of Make Birth Better, explores what happens to those who go through a bad birth. She explains in detail how birth trauma occurs, examines the wide-ranging impact on all of those involved in birth, and looks at treatments and techniques to aid recovery. By drawing on her own research and the work of experts in the field, and sharing the first-hand experiences of women, she shows how it is possible to begin to move on.

The Trauma of Birth

It would be more correct not to use the word “apply,” for it is not a question of one of the usual works on the “Application of Psychoanalysis to the Mental Sciences”; rather it is a matter of making psychoanalytic thought ...

The Trauma of Birth

The following arguments indicate a first attempt to apply the psychoanalytic way of thinking, as such, to the comprehension of the whole development of mankind, even of the actual fact of becoming human. It would be more correct not to use the word “apply,” for it is not a question of one of the usual works on the “Application of Psychoanalysis to the Mental Sciences”; rather it is a matter of making psychoanalytic thought productive for our entire conception of mankind and history. This finally represents the history of mind, that is, the history of the development of the human mind and of the things created by it. This particular viewpoint, still too new to be quite clearly grasped, is made accessible to us through Psychoanalysis by reason of the prodigious extension of our consciousness, which at the present time enables us to recognize part of the deepest Unconscious as such, and to understand its mode of operation. As scientific knowledge itself is no more than a conscious comprehension of previously latent facts, it is only logical that every particle of the extension of our consciousness, gained by analysis, should be converted into understanding. It is now shown at a quite definite point of psychoanalytic knowledge, which we shall soon characterize more definitely, that there is also a considerable part of organic or biological development which can be understood only from the psychical side; that is, from the side which, together with all the residue of development, includes also our own instrument of knowledge, which has suddenly become definitely more efficient through our progressive knowledge of the Unconscious. We have taken certain new individual psychoanalytic experiences solely as a starting-point for a more comprehensive view and for general knowledge; but we believe that in so doing we have opened up the way to something essentially different from the hitherto prevailing “application” of Psychoanalysis. Thus we also lay stress on the fact that we want to keep ourselves free from an overestimation of the psychoanalytic doctrine of the Unconscious as applied to therapy, without thereby departing from the psychoanalytic way of thinking. But at the same time we extend this line of thought in both directions. It is, then, no accident that Psychoanalysis, as soon as it began to develop from a therapeutic procedure into a doctrine of the Unconscious, almost simultaneously deviating from its original medical field, invaded and enriched wellnigh every mental science, and finally itself became one of the most important of mental movements of the present day. The psychic patient, from whose material and by whose help Psychoanalysis was discovered and developed, will always remain the native source for further investigation and extension of the doctrine. Yet this origin is of no more importance today than, for instance, the country from which Columbus set forth, and which furnished the bold explorer with practical means for his voyage.

Traumatic Childbirth

constant reminder of their birth trauma. The sixth theme spoke to breastfeeding
as a way for some mothers to help overcome their traumatic births and prove
themselves as successful mothers. Beck (2011) integrated the findings from six ...

Traumatic Childbirth

Postpartum depression has become a more recognized mental illness over the past decade as a result of education and increased awareness. Traumatic childbirth, however, is still often overlooked, resulting in a scarcity of information for health professionals. This is in spite of up to 34% of new mothers reporting experiencing a traumatic childbirth and prevalence rates rising for high risk mothers, such as those who experience stillbirth or who had very low birth weight infants. This ground-breaking book brings together an academic, a clinician and a birth trauma activist. Each chapter discusses current research, women’s stories, the common themes in the stories and the implications of these for practice, clinical case studies and a clinician’s insights and recommendations for care. Topics covered include: mothers’ perspectives, fathers’ perspectives, the impact on breastfeeding, the impact on subsequent births, PTSD after childbirth and EMDR treatment for PTSD. This book is a valuable resource for health professionals who come into contact with new mothers, providing the most current and accurate information on traumatic childbirth. It also presents mothers’ experiences in a manner that is accessible to women, their partners, and families.

Manual of Neonatal Care

BIRTH TRAUMA Elisa Abdulhayoglu I. Background. Birth injury is defined by the
National Vital Statistics Report as “an impairment of the infant's body or structure
due to ... Mortality due to birth trauma is 3.7 deaths per 100,000 live births.

Manual of Neonatal Care

This manual provides a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of problems of neonates. The book is divided into four sections: Maternal and Fetal Problems, Neonatal Problems, Procedures, and Appendices. An outline format provides quick access to a large amount of information. The Fifth Edition has been fully updated to reflect advances in caring for ever smaller neonates. Two popular appendices from the third edition, Effects of Maternal Drugs on the Fetus and Drug Use by Nursing Mothers, are reincorporated into the new edition.

Fetal and Neonatal Pathology

Definition and Incidence Birth trauma includes all those physical injuries
sustained by the fetus as a consequence of the birth process. It is not as rare as
most would like to believe. A Finnish study of 14,265 live births published in 1990
found ...

Fetal and Neonatal Pathology

Written in a concise and easy-to-read style this third edition of the classic reference in the field of fetal and neonatal pathology provides the essential clinical and pathophysiological information and discusses the pathogenesis of abnormalities as a basis for appropriate methods of investigation. Fully revised and up-dated, the book retains the overall format of previous editions, presenting the same practical approach to the examination of both fetuses and perinatal deaths. Part 1 deals with the examination of the products of conception after the termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies. Part 2 is organised by system, describing and illustrating those pathological problems which are likely to be encountered in the fetus and neonate.

Looking Through the Trauma Lens

Examining a birth trauma lets us look a little bit deeper at subconscious intentions
and how they continue to affect us: specifically, the case of a woman who
suffered from claustrophobia. After an Exploration was done [see Glossary] no
root ...

Looking Through the Trauma Lens

I developed renewed faith in the power of psychotherapy after I attended a Traumatic Incident Reduction (TIR) course in 2011. It opened many doors for me as I began to understand the impact of previously overlooked, objectively minor traumatic incidents on psychological disorders and problems. This article is about the application of this powerful tool over the entire spectrum of psychological problems and disorders and how this brings about impressive and permanent change. The optimal use of this tool in psychotherapy requires a shift in epistemology in which we begin to view mental health through a trauma lens. The definition of psychological trauma can vary. From a TIR perspective, trauma can be defined as any incident that had a negative physical or emotional impact on an individual. This is a very subjective issue as the something could be perceived as traumatic by one individual, but as commonplace and harmless by another. The important thing is the emotional and physical impact the incident had on the individual, its subjective impact. The reason it is so important to view trauma in the broadest way possible is because it explains the chronic mood states of our clients as well as how subconscious intentions and automatic emotional responses affect their current lives. These will be explained below. Traumatic incidents, when understood in the broadest sense possible, have a massive effect on our neurobiology, emotional states and behavioral patterns. Therefore, they can be seen as the driving force behind almost all psychological problems and disorders. When I say traumatic incidents “in the broadest sense possible,” I refer to the everyday incidents of trauma that are objectively perceived as minor, such as an embarrassing comment by a teacher, conflict with a friend, breaking your mother’s expensive vase, etc. It involves an understanding of how the emotional knocks we take on a daily basis affect our neurobiology and continue to have an impact on us in later life. The understanding of subconscious intentions, automatic emotional reactions and responses and chronic mood states are so crucial when it comes to looking at mental health through a trauma lens. Minor and major psychological and physical trauma involves a complex description of the effects on the brain. This article includes detailed case studies including specific incidents such as birth trauma and jealousy and rage. We will look in detail at how trauma results in Goleman’s “Amygdala Hijacking” and how we can help the client break destructive cycles. I also explain why sheer willpower is insufficient to change behavior in the face of traumatic restimulation. Additionally, the article explains how TIR avoids re-traumatization even as clients revisit past incidents.