Biology and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer Metastasis

Proceedings of the National Large Bowel Cancer Project 1984 Conference on
Biology and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer Metastasis Houston, Texas —
September 13–15, 1984 Anthony J. Mastromarino ...

Biology and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer Metastasis

The theme of the current workshop was identified several years ago and was considered by the working group of the National Large Bowel Cancer Project to be an appropriate workshop topic. Although the subject was important then, it was not possible to conduct such a workshop at that time. In the interim, not only did the problems associated with colorectal metastasis still exist, but new insights on the biology and treatment of colorectal cancer metastasis emerged, making the workshop topic especially important and relevant. With input from an expert Planning Committee, a unique program was designed to provide an opportunity for information exchange between basic scientists and clinical investigators. The published proceedings reflect the organization of the workshop which consisted of five sections: Section I. The Biology of Colorectal Cancer Metastasis co-chaired by Drs. J. Isaiah Fidler and George Poste Controversies in the Management of Patients with Colorectal Cancer Section II.

Colon Cancer Cells

C. C.. Hanason. G. L., Gangaware, B. L., and Henke. M. A. (1986). The cotton-top
tamarin as an animal model of colorectal cancer metastasis. In “Biology and
Treatment of Colorectal Cancer Metastasis” (A. J. Mastromarino, ed.), pp. 31 —40
.

Colon Cancer Cells

Colon Cancer Cells brings together fundamental research and clinically relevant issues in the cell biology of colon cancer. This book is composed of five parts encompassing 21 chapters that specifically describe the initiation and progression of colon cancer cells. After briefly dealing with the major issues in colorectal carcinoma, this book goes on presenting the in vitro and in vivo models of colon carcinogenesis. This topic is followed by a discussion on the history of the development and characterization of commonly used colon cancer cell lines. The following parts describe the biochemical and immunological features and hormones in the colon. These parts also consider the studies on human colon tumors xenografted into nude mice and the biology and treatment of colorectal cancer metastasis. Discussions on the application of human monoclonal antibodies to tumor detection; the expression of blood group-related carbohydrates by normal, premalignant, and malignant colonic tissues; and the correlation of antigen variability in colon carcinoma with certain diagnostic and prognostic parameters are also included in these parts. The concluding part examines various therapeutic strategies and their potential in improving patient management with advanced colon carcinoma. Researchers, clinicians, and students interested in the biology of colon cancer development and in gastrointestinal cell biology will find this book invaluable.

Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer

TREATMENT. OF. RECTAL. CANCER. Té Vuong1, Tamim Niazi2, Sender
Liberman3, Polymnia Galiatsatos4 and ... Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer,
Cancer MetastasisBiology and Treatment 14, DOI 10.1007/978-90-481-8833-
8_14, ...

Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide, and in many parts of the western world, it is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. This book covers colon cancer metastasis from the most fundamental aspects to clinical practice. Major topics include physiopathology, genetic and epigenetic controls, cancer initiating cells, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, growth factors and signalling, cell adhesion, natures of liver metastasis, angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, inflammatory response, prognostic markers, sentinel node and staging, and finally diagnosis and treatment. Each chapter has been contributed by leaders in the field. A key feature is that it connects with a large readership including students, fundamentalists and clinicians. Another specific feature of the book is that the chapters are written in a didactic and illustrative fashion. These characteristics coupled with the choice of the topics and authors, makes this book a reference in the field. It represents an essential acquisition for medical libraries, clinicians as well as medical and graduate students.

Application of Monoclonal Antibodies in Tumor Pathology

ISBN 0-89838-619-5 M.J. van Zwieten, The Rat as Animal Model in Breast
Cancer Research: A Histopathological Study of Radiation- and ... ISBN 0-89838-
785-X A.J. Mastromarino, ed., Biology and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer
Metastasis.

Application of Monoclonal Antibodies in Tumor Pathology

The development of monoclonal antibodies to human tumor associated antigens has greatly facilitated the application of immunohistochemical techniques to analyze surgically removed tissues. During the last few years this approach has been utilized by a progressively increasing number of investigators to analyze malignant cells. Although monoclonal antibodies to tumor associated antigens have not become yet routine reagents in immunopathology, they have provided new information which could not be obtained with conventional antisera or histochemical procedures. The following are representative examples. TUmor associated antigens have been identified which display a restricted distribution in normal tissues and therefore may represent useful markers for radio imaging and appropriate targets for immunotherapy. In spite of undetec table differences with conventional histopathological approaches hetero geneity has been found in the antigenic profile of tumor cells within a lesion, in autologous lesions removed from different anatomic sites from a given patient and in lesions removed from different patients. Phenotypes of tumor cells have been identified which correlate with the biology of tumor cells and with the clinical course of the disease. From a practical view point the use of monoclonal antibodies in immunopathology has enhanced interactions between pathologists and immunologists, as exemplified by the present book. Such interactions have contributed to the application of basic research to clinical problems. The chapter of this book discuss investigations performed with monoclonal antibodies to antigens expressed by various types of normal and malignant human cells.

The Biology and Treatment of Cancer

Figure 18. Abdominal CT shows the liver (left) filled with dark nodules or masses
(metastatic colon cancer). The pathology reports reveal an adenocarcinoma of
the colon with spread to the liver. A palliative care consult is obtained. Following
 ...

The Biology and Treatment of Cancer


Breast Cancer Origins Detection and Treatment

Proceedings of the International Breast Cancer Research Conference London,
United Kingdom — March 24–28, 1985 Marvin A. Rich ... Metastasis: Clinical and
Experimental Aspects. ... Biology and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer Metastasis.

Breast Cancer  Origins  Detection  and Treatment

The control of breast cancer, a leading cause of cancer death in women, will depend ultimately on our understanding of the disease--its origin, and progression which in turn will permit the effective management of its treatment, its detection, and perhaps even its prevention. It is for a better understanding of this spectrum of biological processes crossing back and forth across scientific and clinical disciplines that this volume strives. Several broad topics have been addressed in organizing a large mass of work representing state of the art updates from many of the major breast cancer research groups around the world. The chapters in the first section speak to the factors affecting the growth and development of normal and malignant mammary epithelium. Special emphasis is placed on insights drawn from developmental biology, the cellular interactions that occur in the mammary gland during growth and differentiation; and the study of hormones and growth factors in the regulation of growth and differentiation of normal and malignant breast tissues. In the section on the biology of breast cancer, there is a characterization of relevant model systems for the study of breast cancer and their contribution to our understanding of preneoplasia and progression in mammary cancer. Included as well is the current status of major studies on the immunological aspects of breast cancer and the latest efforts in the development of markers for metastasis in breast cancer.

Organ Directed Toxicities of Anticancer Drugs

The Control of Tumor Growth and its Biological Bases. ... The Rat as Animal
Model in Breast Cancer Research: A Histopathological Study of Radiation- and
Hormone-Induced Rat ... Biology and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer Metastasis.

Organ Directed Toxicities of Anticancer Drugs

The addition of chemotherapy as an effective means to treat cancer has had a major impact on selected human malignancies. Due to a general inability to dif ferentiate between normal and neoplastic cells, little selectivity exists in currently used oncolytic drugs. Consequently, significant toxicity to the patient is expected when systemic cancer chemotherapy is chosen as an appropriate therapeutic in tervention. Much of this toxicity, such as damage to the bone marrow, gastroin testinal tract, or hair follicles, is predictable based upon the fact that anticancer drugs kill actively dividing cells. These types of toxicities, while serious, are usually manageable and reversible and are, therefore, not often considered to be dose limiting. Unfortunately, several of the most important anticancer drugs also damage tissues in which the growth fraction is relatively small. Such toxicities can not be predicted based on the chemical structure of the drugs, are often not detected in preclinical studies, and are encountered frequently for the first time in clinical studies. Further, unlike most of the proliferative-dependent toxicities, the unpre dicted toxicities are usually irreversible or only partially reversible upon cessation of drug administration. Because of this, the unpredicted toxicities are referred to as dose limiting. They represent a significant barrier to the ultimate efficacy of several of our most important anticancer drugs.

Biochemical Modulation of Anticancer Agents Experimental and Clinical Approaches

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Detroit Cancer Symposium Detroit, Michigan,
USA — June 13–14, 1986 Frederick A. Valeriote ... The Control of Tumor Growth
and its Biological Bases. ... Biology and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer
Metastasis.

Biochemical Modulation of Anticancer Agents  Experimental and Clinical Approaches

Biochemical Modulation at the present time defines an area of study in which the intracellular metabolism of a given anti cancer agent is modulated (usually by a noncytotoxic agent or a cytotoxic agent at sufficiently low dosage to make it non cytotoxic) in order to either increase the effectiveness of the particular agent against tumor cells or decrease its cytotox icity against normal cells. The major focus of modulation has been the agents 5-fluorouracil (FUra), arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C), methotrexate (MTX) and a few alkylating agents. The major thrust of the studies has been to increase the flow of the anticancer agent along the pathway responsible for the formation of the cytotoxic species: for example, FUra to FUTP or ara-C to ara-CTP. While in most cases the application of research re sults to clinical trials does not require the subsequent exper tise of the laboratory researchers, application of biochemical modulatory schemes to clinical protocols necessitate a dramatic break with the past procedures. As shown in the laboratory clinical loop below, close collaboration between the laboratory and clinical investigator is essential. While the laboratory REDEFINE TECHNOLOGY, TESTS OR QUESTIONS FOR FURTHER THERAPEUTIC ADVANCE CLINICAL EXPERIMENTAL PROTOCOL (LABORATORY) RESEARCH STUDIES DEFINE AND TEST APPROPRIATE SCIENTIFIC PARAMETERS results define rationally-based regimens, it is essential that the clinical protocols contain the requirement that clinical material (either tumor or normal tissues) be sampled to deter mine whether the biochemical modulation being proposed is in fact beinq accomplished.

Breast Cancer Scientific and Clinical Progress

Proceedings of the Biennial Conference for the International Association of
Breast Cancer Research, Miami, Florida, USA — March ... Metastasis Clinical
and Experimental Aspects. ... Biology and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer
Metastasis.

Breast Cancer  Scientific and Clinical Progress

Effective control of breast cancer depends on three types of research accomplishment -- understanding the disease's origins and progression: successfully applying this knowledge to methods of detection, diagnosis and treatment: and finding ways to make these advances truly available to the public as effectively as possible. The significant progress that is occurring across this entire spectrum of pioneering investigation is reflected in these proceedings of the 1987 biennial conference of the International Association for Breast Cancer Research. The first section of the book focuses on oncogenes and chemical effectors that may play key roles in early cell transformation leading to breast cancer. Research discussed includes identification of specific oncogenes which appear to be involved in the disease, study of their activation and expression, examination of the biological effects of various growth factors isolated from breast cancer cell lines, and investigation of the molecular mechanisms by which estrogens promote and stimulate growth of breast cancers. The second group of chapters deals with several other complex factors and phenomena which may influence tumor formation in the breast, for example, expression of abnormalities by fibroblasts, disruption of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, and loss of ability nili to synthesize normal basal lamina resulting in alterations in the extracellular matrix. Clarification of the processes of normal mammary gland development and differentiation is central to much of this work.

Liver Metastasis Biology and Clinical Management

Recent developments in the treatment of metastases from colorectal cancer are
changing the approach to a disease that has traditionally been viewed with
pessimism. Advances in surgery, chemotherapeutics and targeted biologic
therapies ...

Liver Metastasis  Biology and Clinical Management

Liver metastases are a frequent and often fatal occurrence in cancer patients, particularly those with malignancies of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. While recent improvements in surgical techniques and a more aggressive approach to resection of liver metastases have improved long term survival for some patients, most patients with hepatic metastases still succumb to their disease. To improve these dismal statistics, a better understanding of the biology of liver metastasis, particularly the early stages that can be targeted for prevention, is essential. Once cancer cells enter the liver, several different scenarios may occur. The cancer cells may be immediately destroyed by local defence mechanisms, they may enter a state of dormancy as solitary cells and never produce a metastasis, initiate a short-lived process of proliferation that is aborted before a metastasis is established or actively proliferate to form macrometastases. The chapters in Part I of this book provide insight into the cellular/molecular mechanisms that determine which of these scenarios prevails. Written by experts researchers in the filed of metastasis, these chapters provide state-of-the art reviews on the cellular and molecular processes that impact the early stages of the metastatic process. The unique microenvironment of the liver, its various anatomical, cellular and molecular features and the impact they have on metastasis are highlighted. In addition, the role of inflammation (pre-existing and tumor-induced), host innate and adaptive immune responses, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and the unique molecular signatures of metastatic tumor cells are reviewed with an underscoring of the translational implications of the current state of knowledge. Against this background, the chapters in Part II of the book provide critical reviews on major aspects of the clinical management of hepatic metastases. These include imaging strategies, surgical and chemotherapeutic treatment approaches and the use of targeted biological therapeutics such as anti-angiogenic drugs as treatment modalities. By combining information on biological and clinical aspects of liver metastasis, this volume will serve as an excellent resource for scientists, clinicians, clinician/ scientists and trainees in the domains of oncology, surgical oncology, hepatobiliary physiology and radiology.