Biddulph Grange Garden, Staffordshire

National Trust Guidebook

Biddulph Grange Garden, Staffordshire

Biddulph Grange is not just a garden, it is a way of explaining the world. It was made in the mid-19th century, when science was beginning to explore and understand the natural world. In the process, the new theory of evolution would come head-to-head with the Christian principle of Divine Creation. James Bateman and his friend, Edward Cooke, gentlemen amateurs, set out in this garden and its Geological Gallery a model of compromise between the two ideas.In a series of theatrical garden tableaux, Bateman brought together a dynamic collection of extraordinary new plants from China, Sikkim, America and beyond. Biddulph was a horticultural wonder of the age and it remains one of Britain's most important historic gardens.Biddulph Grange today reveals very few clues of the time when it was suffering neglect. This guidebook, illustrated with new photography and rarely seen archive images, not only tells the story of its creation, but also its decline and its remarkable restoration.

50 Gems of Staffordshire

The History & Heritage of the Most Iconic Places

50 Gems of Staffordshire

This beautifully photographed selection of fifty of the county's most precious assets shows what makes Staffordshire great.

Landscape and Vision in Nineteenth-Century Britain and France

Landscape and Vision in Nineteenth-Century Britain and France

A study of the ways landscape was perceived in nineteenth-century Britain and France, this book draws on evidence from poetry, landscape gardens, spectacular public entertainments, novels and scientific works as well as paintings in order to develop its basic premise that landscape and the processes of perceiving it cannot be separated. Vision embraces panoramic seeing from high places, but also the seeing of ghosts and spectres when madness and hallucination impinge upon landscape. The rise of geology and the spread of empires upset the existing comfortable orders of comprehension of landscape. Reverie and imagination produced powerful interpretive actions, while landscape in French culture proved central to the rejection of conservative classicism in favour of perceptual questioning of experience. The experience of subjectivity proved central to the perception of landscape while the visual culture of landscape became of paramount importance to modernity during the period in question.

Public Sculpture of Staffordshire and the Black Country

Public Sculpture of Staffordshire and the Black Country

The "Black Country" is an area historically known as the cradle of the Industrial Revolution—a thriving regioin built around deep coal seams, conjuring up images of fiery red furnaces by night and black, sooty citadels by day. Yet today the resource-rich region also features many striking public sculptures. This volume provides a comprehensive catalog to all of the historic sculptures and public monuments in Staffordshire and the Black Country. George Noszlopy and Fiona Waterhouse catalog each individual sculpture in detail, including information about the sculptor, the sculpture's historical and artistic significance, the commissioning agent, and the date of installation. The volume also features 350 black-and-white photographs that document the diverse and rich beauty of the region's public monuments. The ninth volume in the widely acclaimed, award-winning Public Sculpture of Britain series, Public Sculpture of Staffordshire and the Black Country is an invaluable resource for British historians, art scholars, and travelers alike.