Art Versus Industry?

New Perspectives on Visual and Industrial Cultures in Nineteenth-century Britain

Art Versus Industry?

Art versus industry? is about the encounters between the visual arts and industry in Britain during the long nineteenth-century. It looks beyond the oppositions that were established between these two spheres by later interpretations of the work of John Ruskin, William Morris and the Arts andCrafts movement, to reveal surprising examples of collaboration - between artists, craftspeople, designers, inventors, curators, engineers and educators - at a crucial period in the formation of the cultural and commercial identity of Britain and its colonies.This lively and richly illustrated collection operates across disciplines to explore such diverse subjects as the production of lace, the mechanical translation of sculpture, the display of stained glass, the use of the kaleidoscope in painting and pattern design, the emergence of domestic electriclighting, the politics of ornament and the development of art and design education and international exhibitions in India. With contributions by leading academics in the fields of art history, museums studies and the history and philosophy of science, its approach is as varied as its contents, oftendrawing on little-used primary sources and offering new perspectives on existing literature.Art versus industry? provides an essential source to both students and academics in the (British) histories of art and design, museum studies, the history and philosophy of science and postcolonial studies. It will also appeal to the general reader interested in the industrial and visual cultures ofthe Victorian period.

The Global Work of Art

World's Fairs, Biennials, and the Aesthetics of Experience

The Global Work of Art

Global biennials have proliferated in the contemporary art world, but artists’ engagement with large-scale international exhibitions has a much longer history that has influenced the present in important ways. Going back to the earliest world’s fairs in the nineteenth century, this book argues that “globalism” was incubated in a century of international art contests and today constitutes an important tactic for artists. As world’s fairs brought millions of attendees into contact with foreign cultures, products, and processes, artworks became juxtaposed in a “theater of nations,” which challenged artists and critics to think outside their local academies. From Gustave Courbet’s rebel pavilion near the official art exhibit at the 1855 French World’s Fair to curator Beryl Madra’s choice of London-based Cypriot Hussein Chalayan for the off-site Turkish pavilion at the 2006 Venice Biennale, artists have used these exhibitions to reflect on contemporary art, speak to their own governments back home, and challenge the wider geopolitical realm—changing art and art history along the way. Ultimately, Caroline A. Jones argues, the modern appetite for experience and event structures, which were cultivated around the art at these earlier expositions, have now come to constitute contemporary art itself, producing encounters that transform the public and force us to reflect critically on the global condition.

Euro-Visions

Europe in Contemporary Cinema

Euro-Visions

European cinema not only occupies a dominant place in film history, it is also a field that has been raising more interest with the expanding work on the transnational. Euro-Visions asks what idea of Europe emerges, is represented and constructed by contemporary European film. Adopting a broad and wide-ranging approach, Euro-Visions mixes political sources, historical documents and filmic texts and offers an integration of policy and economic contexts with textual analysis. Mariana Liz examines costume dramas, biopics and war films, mainstream co-productions and tales of 'Fortress Europe' by renowned auteurs, showing how films from different European nations depict and contribute to the formation of the idea of Europe. Case studies include Girl with a Pearl Earring, La Vie en Rose, Black Book, Good Bye Lenin!, Match Point and The Silence of Lorna.

Tales of Ghosts

First Nations Art in British Columbia, 1922-61

Tales of Ghosts

The years between 1922 and 1961, often referred to as the "Dark Ages of Northwest Coast art," have largely been ignored by art historians, and dismissed as a period of artistic decline. Tales of Ghosts compellingly reclaims this era, arguing that it was instead a critical period during which the art played an important role in public discourses on the status of First Nations people in Canadian society. Those with an interest in First Nations and Canadian history and art history, anthropology, museology, and post-colonial studies will be delighted by the publication of this major contribution to their fields.

The New Bibliopolis

French Book Collectors and the Culture of Print, 1880-1914

The New Bibliopolis

The late-nineteenth century in Europe was a period of profound political, social, and technological change. One result of these changes was the rise in France of an upper-bourgeois bohemian class. Many of its members stimulated interest in unique forms of artistic expression such as illustrated books. On account of their influence, an atmosphere of intense bibliophilic activity came to define French culture at the turn of the century. The New Bibliopolis explores the role of amateurs in promoting the book arts in France during this period. Drawing on extensive original research, Willa Z. Silverman looks at the ways in which book collectors supported print culture. She shows how, through the admiration demonstrated by collectors for this medium, print came to be a crucial part of popular conceptions of aesthetics. As collectors, publishers, authors, designers, and directors of bibliophile societies, reviews, and small presses, these book lovers became passionate and prolific interlocutors of the printed word in a uniquely artistic epoch. Silverman analyzes subjects as diverse as the relationship between book collecting and aesthetic and cultural currents such as Symbolism; the gendered nature of book collecting; the increased collaboration between authors and illustrators; and the marketing of fine books at international exhibits. The New Bibliopolis is an important contribution to the study of book history, French sociocultural history, and fine and decorative arts.

Music

The Law and Music Contracts

Music

"As an experienced trainer and an active practitioner, Nigel Lipton is ideally placed to provide a text that is accessible and yet useful in UK practice. Key contents: The copyright framework, Moral rights, Copyright in practice: the PRS, The Business: case study of a band, Management - including specimen terms, Record contracts - negotiation and drafting, Publishing contracts, Merchandising, Touring, Explanation of terms and formats, The future."

Glass

Glass