The Catskills

Painters, Writers, and Tourists in the Mountains, 1820-1895

The Catskills


Potters' View of Canada

Canadian Scenes on Nineteenth-Century Earthenware

Potters' View of Canada

The potters' views of Canada have a many-sided appeal, linking the world of artists, printmakers, and photographers to the ceramics industry. As part of material history, they reflect not only taste in the wares themselves - their bodies, colours, shapes - but also the changing ways of looking at things, from the romantic to the literal. Covering the period for the beginning of the nineteenth century to the end of Queen Victoria's reign, this volume focuses chiefly on wares made for the dinner table or the washstand. All are earthenware, decorated by transfer printing, and produced by British potters. The scenes they depict range from the awesome falls at Niagara to early steamboats on the St Lawrence, from igloos in the Arctic to a governor's residence in New Brunswick. Elizabeth Collard traces the evolution of these wares, placing them in their historical setting and identifying the sources from which many of the views were derived. She also provides much detail on the English and Scottish potters and on the artists whose work they adapted to their own use. One of the most important collections of these wares belong to the National Museum of Man, Ottawa, and it is from the national collection that illustrations for this book have been drawn. The more than 170 photographs also include such material as the published prints on which the potters' views were based, border designs, and potters' marks. This book will be an invaluable reference work not only for collectors and dealers but also for museum curators and material culture historians.

Catalog of Copyright Entries. Third Series

1977: July-December: Index

Catalog of Copyright Entries. Third Series


Classical Savannah

Fine & Decorative Arts, 1800-1840

Classical Savannah

By the end of the eighteenth century, classicism, which arose out of Europe's fascination with ancient Greece and Rome, had also left its mark on America. This study of the classical style in the fine and decorative arts shows the extent to which it influenced the material culture of Savannah, Georgia, from 1800 to 1840. More than 130 examples of objects owned in Savannah in this period are illustrated, described, and discussed. The objects include oil paintings and watercolors, clocks, musical instruments, jewelry, sculptures, engravings, bank notes, needlework, china, silver, brass, lighting fixtures, architectural elements, and furniture. Page Talbott presents an overview of the origins of classicism in Europe and its spread to America. Emphasizing Americans' close identification of classicism with national values and ideals, Talbott also discusses the style in the context of Savannah's social life and its history as a major southern port. She covers not only the principles, methods, and materials of classical design, but also the manufacture, distribution, sale, and ownership of a wide range of functional and decorative objects. Classical Savannah is the companion volume to the Classical Savannah exhibition, which opened in the spring of 1995 at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah. Illustrating well over half of the items in the exhibit, and including a detailed checklist of the additional seventy objects not shown in the book, Classical Savannah is a valuable source for historians, designers, decorators, collectors, and anyone interested in this period of America's history.

Albany Institute of History & Art

200 Years of Collecting

Albany Institute of History & Art

Beautifully illustrated introduction and overview to the collections of the Albany Institute of History and Art