Africa’s Competitiveness in the Global Economy

Africa’s Competitiveness in the Global Economy

This book highlights the key issues, opportunities and challenges facing African firms, industries, cities and nations in their quest to compete successfully in the global economy. Exploring a topic which has grown in importance as Africa faces a period of subdued economic development, this edited collection takes a unique multi-disciplinary, multi-industry and multi-country approach. The authors provide insights into a broad range of issues, including competitiveness measurement and evaluation, sectoral competitiveness of declining and emerging industries, threats of the ‘Dutch Disease,’ and talent competitiveness. This timely book offers a response to the urgent need for the diversification of economies and the advancement of manufacturing in Africa, appealing to scholars of international business and economics.

Multilingual Universities in South Africa

Reflecting Society in Higher Education

Multilingual Universities in South Africa

Focusing on the use of African languages in higher education, this book showcases South African higher education practitioners’ attempts to promote a multilingual ethos in their classes. It is a first-time overview of multilingual teaching and learning strategies that have been tried and tested in a number of higher education institutions in South Africa. Despite language-in-education policies that extol the virtues of multilingualism, practice remains oriented towards English-only learning and teaching. In the multilingual contexts of local campuses, this book shows how students and lecturers attempt to understand their multiple identities and use the available languages to create multilingual learning environments.

Africa in the Global Economy

Africa in the Global Economy

An analysis of the role of international trade in Africa. It examines: the trade policies of the sub-Saharan African countries; the impact of GATT and the WTO; the impact of specific GATT/WTO agreements; and the viability of regional economic integration as a strategy for trade and development.

The Oxford Companion to the Economics of South Africa

The Oxford Companion to the Economics of South Africa

In 1994 South Africa saw the end of apartheid. The new era of political freedom was seen as the foundation for economic prosperity and inclusion. The last two decades have seen mixed results. Economic growth has been volatile. While inequalities in public services have been reduced, income inequality has increased, and poverty has remained stagnant. As the twentieth anniversary of the transition to democracy approaches in 2014, the economic policy debates in South Africa are in full flow. They combine a stocktake of the various programs of the last two decades with a forward looking discussion of strategy in the face of an ever open but volatile global economy. Underlying the discourse are basic and often unresolved differences on an appropriate strategy for an economy like South Africa, with a strong natural resource base but with deeply entrenched inherited inequalities, especially across race. This volume contributes to the policy and analytical debate by pulling together perspectives on a range of issues: micro, macro, sectoral, country wide and global, from leading economists working on South Africa. Other than the requirement that it be analytical and not polemical, the contributors were given freedom to put forward their particular perspective on their topic. The economists invited are from within South Africa and from outside; from academia and the policy world; from international and national level economic policy agencies. The contributors include recognized world leaders in South African economic analysis, as well as the very best of the younger crop of economists who are working on the study of South Africa, the next generation of leaders in thought and policy.

Development Centre Seminars Policies to Promote Competitiveness in Manufacturing in Sub-Saharan Africa

Development Centre Seminars Policies to Promote Competitiveness in Manufacturing in Sub-Saharan Africa

Primary commodities dominate African exports, yet these products are extremely vulnerable to variations in weather conditions, world demand and prices. If the continent is to obtain optimum benefit from the integration and opening of the world ...

Promoting Trade Competitiveness in Developing Countries

Promoting Trade Competitiveness in Developing Countries

Globalization has had far-reaching consequences to both developed and developing economies, and will inevitably have potentially greater roles and impacts in the future. Developing countries stand to lose or gain from globalization, depending on how they marshal resources and manage the dynamics of globalization to their advantage. Experience shows that only a few developing countries have managed to take advantage of the opportunities offered by globalization or mitigate its negative and far-reaching consequences. Most of them are still mired in the economic doldrums due to the lack of a proper understanding of the factors at play and management incapacity. In this book, various insights which critically address globalization and development issues have been thoughtfully put together in order to provoke debates and lead to solutions that help improve the lot of developing countries. The book is the results of the initiative by University of Dar es Salaam Business School, which, in 2011, brought together various stakeholders to an International Conference on Globalization and Development with the theme “Promoting Trade Competitiveness in Developing Countries”. Thematic areas including regional integration, business regulations, Chinese investments in Africa, globalization, the Africa Growth Opportunity Act, foreign direct investments, and natural resources development were calculatedly selected on account of being topical and relevant in the context of Africa. The book will be valuable for academics, researchers, students and practitioners working in the fields of international business, natural resource management and foreign direct investments not only in Africa, but also in other developing countries. The topics and synthesis dealt with in this book will also be handy for practitioners working in international development agencies, public and private sectors, government ministries, departments and agencies.

Africa's Oil Abundance and External Competitiveness: Do Institutions Matter?

Africa's Oil Abundance and External Competitiveness: Do Institutions Matter?

This paper examines the structural competitiveness of oil-rich economies in sub-Saharan Africa relative to other major oil-exporting developing countries, and investigates reasons for systematic differences in the non-oil export performance across these economies. The analysis reveals that oil-rich Africa lags behind other oil-exporters in terms of diversification, global market share and the overall investment climate. The poor performance of their nonoil sector can be largely attributed to weak infrastructure and institutional quality. The results also show that institutional quality is a significant determinant of the extent to which oil abundance affects the competitiveness of the non-oil sector; thereby explaining the divergent experiences of oil-rich economies across the world. This implies that oil wealth does not necessarily weaken the non-oil tradable sector; countries may mitigate the impact of Dutch disease and benefit from oil booms if revenues are used prudently to reduce oil dependence.

South Africa

2003 Article IV Consultation-Staff Report; Staff Statement; and Public Information Notice on the Executive Board Discussion

South Africa

This 2003 Article IV Consultation highlights that the South African economy performed well in 2002, notwithstanding difficult global economic conditions. Supported by sound macroeconomic management and a highly competitive exchange rate, real GDP growth rose to 3.0 percent in 2002 from 2.8 percent in 2001. However, growth slowed to 1.5 percent in the first quarter of 2003, largely in response to a strong currency appreciation and tight financial conditions. The sharp currency depreciation that occurred in the second half of 2001 provided a major boost to activity during much of 2002.

Regional Trade Arrangements in Africa

Past Performance and the Way Forward

Regional Trade Arrangements in Africa

Regional trade arrangements (RTAs) in Africa have been ineffective in promoting trade and foreign direct investment. Relatively high external trade barriers and low resource complementarity between member countries limit both intra- and extraregional trade. Small market size, poor transport facilities and high trading costs make it difficult for African countries to reap the potential benefits of RTAs. To increase regional trade and investment, African countries need to undertake more broad-based liberalization and streamline existing RTAs, supported by improvements in infrastructure and trade facilitation. Early action to strengthen the domestic revenue base would help address concerns over revenue losses from trade liberalization.