Engineering Education

Engineering Education


Toward a Social History of Knowledge

... employees in medical and social services in the census ) ; “ High white collar "
covers engineers as well as administrative cadres supérieurs in the private sector
, although the engineers are not separately mentioned in the survey of students ...

Toward a Social History of Knowledge

One of the foremost historians of intellectual life and education in Germany, Fritz Ringer has brought together in this volume several of his articles, most of which are not easily available are published here in English for the first time. They focus on a whole range of contemporary and historical debates about the relationship between ideas and their context, the role of education and middle-class consciousness, the social role of academics and intellectuals, and competing ideals of learning, science, and history.

Engineering the Future Understanding the Past

At the same time, social challenges have shaped engineering science and practice. This book examines why and how engineers have engaged in solving social challenges -challenges for society, for business, and for users.

Engineering the Future  Understanding the Past

The world is in turmoil: we are witnessing steep social and environmental challenges. Technology is identified as both cause of and solution to these challenges. How can we use technology to solve problems - without creating new ones? Engineering the Future, Understanding the Past discusses the role of engineering in our age of grand challenges - by drawing lessons from the past. Since the birth of modern engineering roughly two centuries ago, technology has helped to reshape our modern world. At the same time, social challenges have shaped engineering science and practice. This book examines why and how engineers have engaged in solving social challenges -challenges for society, for business, and for users. It also asks why some technological solutions have unexpectedly created new problems. And it studies how engineers have coped with technology's puzzling ability to both help and harm.

A Social History of Knowledge II

... astrochemistry, atmospheric chemistry, chemical biology, chemical
engineering, chemo-informatics, electrochemistry, environmental chemistry,
femtochemistry, flavour chemistry, flow chemistry, geochemistry, green chemistry,
histochemistry ...

A Social History of Knowledge II

Peter Burke follows up his magisterial Social History of Knowledge, picking up where the first volume left off around 1750 at the publication of the French Encyclopédie and following the story through to Wikipedia. Like the previous volume, it offers a social history (or a retrospective sociology of knowledge) in the sense that it focuses not on individuals but on groups, institutions, collective practices and general trends. The book is divided into 3 parts. The first argues that activities which appear to be timeless - gathering knowledge, analysing, disseminating and employing it - are in fact time-bound and take different forms in different periods and places. The second part tries to counter the tendency to write a triumphalist history of the 'growth' of knowledge by discussing losses of knowledge and the price of specialization. The third part offers geographical, sociological and chronological overviews, contrasting the experience of centres and peripheries and arguing that each of the main trends of the period - professionalization, secularization, nationalization, democratization, etc, coexisted and interacted with its opposite. As ever, Peter Burke presents a breath-taking range of scholarship in prose of exemplary clarity and accessibility. This highly anticipated second volume will be essential reading across the humanities and social sciences.

The Factory A Social History of Work and Technology

Scientists and engineers were portrayed as geniuses who were credited with
designing safe and reliable vehicles. In 1932, Studebaker, an auto company that
initially crafted carriages, staked their claim as a superior manufacturer “upon the
 ...

The Factory  A Social History of Work and Technology

The book goes beyond the assembly line to examine the physical environment of the industrial landscape. • Appeals to readers interested in world history, industrial tourism, and the robotics industry • Explains the significance of the factory to American history and culture • Tells the story of American factory work through spaces and objects • Details how factory buildings have evolved over the years

A Social History of Economic Decline

John A. Roebling began as an engineer, and his family continued that interest in
technology; all his sons and grandsons were educated in engineering. Their
technical training encouraged the family to branch out into the new automobile ...

A Social History of Economic Decline

Business, Politics, and Work in Trenton (Class & Culture)

A Social History of Modern Art Volume 2

The great institute of technology, energetically promoted by Napoleon, was the
Ecole polytechnique, which became the nursery and model for all later
engineering schools. It opened at the end of 1794 and succeeded mainly
because it was ...

A Social History of Modern Art  Volume 2

In this second volume, Albert Boime continues his work on the social history of Western art in the Modern epoch. This volume offers a major critique and revisionist interpretation of Western European culture, history, and society from Napoleon's seizure of power to 1815. Boime argues that Napoleon manipulated the production of images, as well as information generally, in order to maintain his political hegemony. He examines the works of French painters such as Jacques-Louis David and Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, to illustrate how the art of the time helped to further the emperor's propagandistic goals. He also explores the work of contemporaneous English genre painters, Spain's Francisco de Goya, the German Romantics Philipp Otto Runge and Caspar David Friedrich, and the emergence of a national Italian art. Heavily illustrated, this volume is an invaluable social history of modern art during the Napoleonic era. Stimulating and informative, this volume will become a valuable resource for faculty and undergraduates.—R. W. Liscombe, Choice

A Social History of English

Throughout the world, moreover, the process can be characterised by an
important feature: it involves somewhere along the line an element of
engineering, a conscious attempt to cultivate a variety that can be used for all
purposes. A standard ...

A Social History of English

A Social History of English is the first history of the English language to utilize the techniques, insights and concerns of sociolinguistics. Written in a non-technical way, it takes into account standardization, pidginization, bi- and multilingualism, the issues of language maintenance and language loyalty, and linguistic variation. This new edition has been fully revised. Additions include: * new material about 'New Englishes' across the world * a new chapter entitled 'A Critical Linguistic History of English Texts' * a discussion of problems involved in writing a history of English All terms and concepts are explained as they are introduced, and linguistic examples are chosen for their accessibility and intelligibility to the general reader. It will be of interest to students of Sociolinguistics, English Language, History and Cultural Studies.

The Devil s Milk

This book, the product of exhaustive scholarship carried out in many countries and several continents, is destined to become a classic.Tully tells the story of humanity's long encounter with rubber in a kaleidoscopic narrative that regards ...

The Devil s Milk

Capital, as Marx once wrote, comes into the world "dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt." He might well have been describing the long, grim history of rubber. From the early stages of primitive accumulation to the heights of the industrial revolution and beyond, rubber is one of a handful of commodities that has played a crucial role in shaping the modern world, and yet, as John Tully shows in this remarkable book, laboring people around the globe have every reason to regard it as "the devil's milk." All the advancements made possible by rubber--industrial machinery, telegraph technology, medical equipment, countless consumer goods--have occurred against a backdrop of seemingly endless exploitation, conquest, slavery, and war. But Tully is quick to remind us that the vast terrain of rubber production has always been a site of struggle, and that the oppressed who toil closest to "the devil's milk" in all its forms have never accepted their immiseration without a fight. This book, the product of exhaustive scholarship carried out in many countries and several continents, is destined to become a classic.Tully tells the story of humanity's long encounter with rubber in a kaleidoscopic narrative that regards little as outside its rangewithout losing sight of the commodity in question. With the skill of a master historian and the elegance of a novelist, he presents what amounts to a history of the modern world told through the multiple lives of rubber.