Official Catalogue

Official Catalogue


Paris: The Collected Traveler

Paris: The Collected Traveler

Each edition of this unique series marries a collection of previously published essays with detailed practical information, creating a colorful and deeply absorbing pastiche of opinions and advice. Each book is a valuable resource -- a compass of sorts -- pointing vacationers, business travelers, and readers in many directions. Going abroad with a Collected Traveler edition is like being accompanied by a group of savvy and observant friends who are intimately familiar with your destination. This edition on Paris features: Distinguished writers, such as Mavis Gallant, Barbara Grizzuti Harrison, Herbert Gold, Olivier Bernier, Richard Reeves, Patricia Wells, Catharine Reynolds, and Gerald Asher, who share seductive pieces about Parisian neighborhoods, personalities, the Luxembourg Gardens, Père-Lachaise and other monuments, restaurants and wine bars, le Plan de Paris, and le Beaujolais Nouveau. Annotated bibliographies for each section with recommendations for related readings. An A-Z "renseignements pratiques" (practical information) section covering everything from accommodations, marches aux puces (flea markets), and money to telephones, tipping, and the VAT. Whether it's your first trip or your tenth, the Collected Traveler books are indispensable, and meant to be the first volumes you turn to when planning your journeys.

The Golden Moments of Paris

A Guide to the Paris of the 1920s

The Golden Moments of Paris

In The Golden Moments of Paris, John Baxter uncovers fascinating true stories about the characters that gave Paris its "character" in the years between World War I and World War II. Explore one of the world's most beautiful and loved cities in 26 fact-filled, humorous, and dramatic stories about the famed Années Folles—the Crazy Years—at the turn of the 20th century in Paris. Learn about Gertrude Stein and her famous writers' salon, Salvador Dali and the Surrealists, the birth of Chanel No. 5, and the antics of Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and the "lost generation." Then see what these areas look like today by following along on the guided walking tours of Paris's historic neighborhoods and the cafes, clubs, and brothels that were home to the intellectuals, artists, and Bohemians, illustrated with color photographs and period maps.

The Opposite of Maybe

A Novel

The Opposite of Maybe

A heartfelt and exceptionally human novel about the best mistakes a person can make Jonathan and Rosie have been together so long they finish each other’s sentences—so when he (finally) proposes and asks her to move across the country with him, everyone is happily surprised. But when things suddenly unravel, Rosie sends Jonathan packing and moves back home with Soapie, the irascible, opinionated grandmother who raised her. Now she has to figure out how to fire Soapie’s very unsuitable caregiver, a gardener named Tony who lets her drink martinis, smoke, and cheat at Scrabble. It’s meant to be a temporary break, of course—until Rosie realizes she’s accidentally pregnant at 44, completely unequipped for motherhood, and worse, may be falling in love with Tony, whose life is even more muddled than hers. When Soapie reveals a long-hidden secret, Rosie wonders if she has to let go of her fears, and trust that the big-hearted, messy life that awaits her just may be the one she was meant to live. Praise for The Opposite of Maybe “Dawson’s charmingly eccentric cast of characters is at turns lovable and infuriating, ensuring a quick read helmed by a memorable, complex heroine.”—Publishers Weekly “Delightfully witty . . . A messy, funny, surprising story of second chances.”—Kirkus Reviews “Dawson keeps readers turning the pages to find out who Rosie will choose in the end.”—Booklist

Time Out Paris

Time Out Paris

Time Out's resident team helps you get the best from the fascinating French capital in this annual guide. Along with detailed coverage of the Louvre, the Eiffel Tower and all the major attractions, Time Out Paris gives you the inside track on local culture, with illuminating features and independent reviews throwing the spotlight on everything from ancient street-corner cafés to vital new nightclubs. The 20th edition of Time Out Paris, written by a resident team of journalists, will help you get through the maze of tiny streets and the seemingly endless range of choices.

The Paris Adventures of Judith & Amy

The Paris Adventures of Judith & Amy

This travel/mystery book starts as an e-journal of the six month stay in Paris of the mid-career, well-traveled Judith and Amy. Amy, a rocket scientist from Pasadena, California, is a visiting researcher at the French National Laboratories in Paris. Judith, her girlfriend and a professor of English at a Los Angeles area community college is on unpaid leave accompanying her. Judith, with the promise of many visitors and no special projects in mind aside from learning to speak French, has decided to write an e-journal to friends and family. Thus, the book is in an epistolary form, written pretty much in the present tense as it describes events shortly after they have happened, and includes photos Judith or friends have taken to illustrate various points. In addition to Judiths narratives and photos, edited versions of replies from her correspondents, which Judith was surprised to receive but felt needed to be shared in view of her commitment to community, are included at the beginning of each installment after the first. Overall, Judith appears only a semi-aware narrator, coming across a bit as an innocent abroad, yet, at the same time, is highly self-reflective about language and fills the narrative with word play, parenthetical references, popular culture references, high and low culture jokes, and philosophy. Overall, the tone is one of bemused innocence (or slight paranoia), and benign irony. Judiths task of having her journal be something besides the ordinary becomes simplified when, in time for the first installment, she and Amy happen to be at the sight of the discovery of a dead body in a canal near the Bastille. The same evening as the discovery of the body, Judith and Amy are asked by their temporary landlady to assist her in securing the contents of a safe deposit box in Zurich to help her ailing aunt. As Judith and Amy are heading to Zurich that week to attend the opening of a sculpture exhibit by one of their friends, it seems the least they could do to help this older woman. The body and the visit to the bank sets off a series of events that embroil Judith and Amy, Judiths French tutor and fellow students, Amys French bosses, their French friends, and American and other visitors in an apparent drug war. Since Judith is in France illegally and subject to possible deportation, Amy and Judith are forced to rely only on friends and their own ingenuity and interpretive powers to connect the clues and extricate themselves from what increasingly seems to be some sort of misunderstanding on the part of gangsters about their involvement in drug smuggling. The solving of the mystery makes up the narrative line of the text. But, at the same time as Judith and Amy become increasingly enmeshed in mystery, Judith has not forgotten that essentially her correspondence is a travel journal. So she continues to interweave descriptions and ponderings on the relationships among and meanings of popular culture and customs, politics, critical theory, science, religion, language, class, race, art, architecture, as well as adventures and anecdotes from previous travels with Amy, into the narrative. Even though Judiths paranoia colors her perception and interpretation of events and thus confuses her readers about what is real and what fiction, there do seem to be people following Judith and Amy and the clues Judith and Amy discover, all having to do with fire, water, earth, and air are undoubtedly real. Judith and Amys efforts to follow the clues, or to flee the implications of the clues, lead them and their friends to a variety of spectacles in Paris as well as the Parisian canals, fireworks at La Defense and la Villette, a night of fountains and fireworks Versailles, opera at Vaux le Viscomte, the beach at La Baule, in France, medieval Bruges in Belgium, and London, England before they solve the mystery and help justice be done.

La Vie de Paris

La Vie de Paris

As a youngster in 1912, Toby Edgeworth first visited Paris. His holiday ended far too soon, but Toby vowed to return. He fulfilled his promise in 1923 and stayed a lifetime.In this fictional memoir, journalist James Brogan is assigned to discover what became of Toby, a fellow journalist, who once wrote a column for the same British daily for which James now works. Toby's columns presented vivid images of what occupied the attentions and possessed the imaginations of Parisians between World Wars I and II.Surprised to find Toby still alive, James develops a close friendship with him. Beyond penning just a single newspaper profile, Toby asks James to chronicle his life story, including detailed reminisces of Paris when she was alive with the littérateur and bon viveur.Over their six-year relationship, Brogan listens to Toby's recollections and lyrically illustrates one of the most glamorous periods in Paris history. La Vie de Paris captures Toby's joys of living, from promenading the Grande Boulevards to observing the kaleidoscope of people from café terraces. Through Toby's story, you'll delight in everything from a restful morning in Luxembourg Gardens to a glimpse of nightlife on the fairyland-like tableau of the Champs Elysee.