A Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison

A Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison

Mary Jemison was one of the most famous white captives who, after being captured by Indians, chose to stay and live among her captors. In the midst of the Seven Years War(1758), at about age fifteen, Jemison was taken from her western Pennsylvania home by a Shawnee and French raiding party. Her family was killed, but Mary was traded to two Seneca sisters who adopted her to replace a slain brother. She lived to survive two Indian husbands, the births of eight children, the American Revolution, the War of 1812, and the canal era in upstate New York. In 1833 she died at about age ninety.

A Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison - Scholar's Choice Edition

A Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison - Scholar's Choice Edition

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Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison

Deh-He-W -MIS-The Ordeals and Life of a Young Settler Girl Captured by Indians During the French and Indian War

Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison

'Little woman of great courage'-the life of Mary Jemison Mary Jemison's is a remarkable story. Born in 1743, she was captured by Indians whilst in her teenage years. Her family had emigrated from Ireland and settled on the troubled Pennsylvania frontier in lands controlled by the Iroquois. The Seven Years War broke out and its realisation in the New World, the French and Indian war set the border-lands ablaze. In 1755 a mixed raiding party of Shawnee warriors and Frenchmen captured the Jemison family and an unrelated boy but subsequently killed most of them. Mary was sold to the Senecas and disappeared into the wilderness. Her remarkable story of captivity that gradually led to integration into the life of the Indians of the Eastern woodlands makes vital reading for all those interested in the role of women in the opening up of early America. Jemison eventually elected to live her life as a Seneca despite much subsequent interaction with white settlers. Her descriptions of the part played by the Indian tribes during the Revolutionary War are both unusual and vitally interesting. Leonaur editions are newly typeset and are not facsimiles; each title is available in softcover and hardback with dustjacket.

A Narrative Of The Life Of Mrs. Mary Jemison Who Was Taken By The Indians In The Year 1755

A Narrative Of The Life Of Mrs. Mary Jemison Who Was Taken By The Indians In The Year 1755

The experiences, based on her own account, of Mary Jemison who was captured by a Shawnee war party when she was twelve and subsequently rescued and adopted by the Seneca with whom she chose to remain the rest of her long life.

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