A Kingdom in Crisis

Thailand's Struggle for Democracy in the Twenty-First Century

A Kingdom in Crisis

‘Perhaps the best introduction yet to the roots of Thailand’s present political impasse. A brilliant book.’ Simon Long, The Economist Struggling to emerge from a despotic past, and convulsed by an intractable conflict that will determine its future, Thailand stands at a defining moment in its history. Scores have been killed on the streets of Bangkok. Freedom of speech is routinely denied. Democracy appears increasingly distant. And many Thais fear that the death of King Bhumibol Adulyadej is expected to unleash even greater instability. Yet in spite of the impact of the crisis, and the extraordinary importance of the royal succession, they have never been comprehensively analysed – until now. Breaking Thailand's draconian lèse majesté law, Andrew MacGregor Marshall is one of the only journalists covering contemporary Thailand to tell the whole story. Marshall provides a comprehensive explanation that for the first time makes sense of the crisis, revealing the unacknowledged succession conflict that has become entangled with the struggle for democracy in Thailand.

Saudi Arabia Exposed

Inside a Kingdom in Crisis

Saudi Arabia Exposed

Saudi Arabia: land of oil, terrorism, Islamic fundamentalism, and a crucial American ally. As the only Western journalist to have extensively worked in the Saudi Kingdom, John R. Bradley is uniquely able to expose the turmoil that is shaking the House of Saud to its foundations. From the heart of the secretive Islamic kingdom's urban centers to its most remote mountainous terrain, from the homes of royalty to the slums of its poorest inhabitants, he provides intimate details and reveals underlying regional, religious, and tribal rivalries. Bradley highlights tensions generated by social change, focuses on the educational system, the increasing restlessness of Saudi youth faced with limited opportunities for cultural and political expression, and the predicament of Saudi women seeking opportunities but facing constraints. What are the implications for the Sauds and the West? This book offers a startling look at the present predicament and a troubling view of the future.

Focus on Swaziland

A Kingdom in Crisis

Focus on Swaziland


Kingdom in Crisis

The Zulu Response to the British Invasion of 1879

Kingdom in Crisis


Bhutan

the dragon kingdom in crisis

Bhutan


A Kingdom in Two Parishes

Lancashire Religious Writers and the English Monarchy, 1521-1689

A Kingdom in Two Parishes

The market town of Bolton in the County and royal Duchy of Lancaster has been noted by specialist scholars and general writers alike for its extraordinary contribution to the history of the Reformation, Civil War, and Nonconformity, and to its stream of vigorous religious writers. In this book for the first time these authors are located in their native landscape and discussed in their rich individuality and as a group. Aiming at supremacy in church and state, Henry VIII had destroyed regional pilgrimage shrines that drew both earthly and religious loyalty. Seeking a fairer image of God in Trinity, religious writers felt compelled to modify political concepts of authority, sovereignty, and assent already associated with Father, son, and Spirit. In the process, both God and the king were transformed.

Southeast Asia in the New International Era

Southeast Asia in the New International Era

Southeast Asia in the New International Era, seventh edition, provides readers with up-to-date coverage on a vibrant region home to more than 600 million people, vast cultural diversity, and dynamic globalized markets. Sensitive to historical legacies, and with special attention to developments since the end of the Cold War, this book highlights the events, players, and institutions that shape the region. Employing a country-by-country format, the analysis engages in context-specific treatment of the region's eleven countries: Thailand, Myanmar (Burma), Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, the Philippines, Indonesia, Timor-Leste, Malaysia, Singapore, and Brunei. Each chapter focuses on political and economic developments, key institutions, state-society relations, and foreign affairs. In light of the December 2015 launch of the new ASEAN Community, this seventh edition includes a new chapter on ASEAN and the prospects of regional integration. An excellent resource for students, Southeast Asia in the New International Era makes sense of the region's coups, policy debates, protests, and alliances, leaving readers with a solid foundation for further study.

Church and Community in Crisis

The Gospel According to Matthew

Church and Community in Crisis

Shows how Matthew's Gospel was shaped by and in response to local regional tensions within Jewish society and culture in the post-70 C.E. period in Palestine.

Church in Crisis

The Gay Controversy and the Anglican Communion

Church in Crisis

What if the challenge gay men and women present the church with is not emancipatory but hermeneutic? Suppose that at the heart of the problem there is the magna quaestio, the question about the gay experience, its sources and its character, that gays must answer for themselves: how this form of sensibility and feeling is shaped by its social context and how it can be clothed in an appropriate pattern of life for the service of God and discipleship of Christ? But suppose, too, that there is another question corresponding to it, which non-gay Christians need to answer: how and to what extent this form of sensibility and feeling has emerged in specific historical conditions, and how the conditions may require, as an aspect of the pastoral accommodation that changing historical conditions require, a form of public presence and acknowledgment not hitherto known? These two questions come together as a single question: how are we to understand together the particularity of the age in which we are given to attest God's works?

Language Crisis in the Ryukyus

The Price for Being Japanese?

Language Crisis in the Ryukyus

Long denigrated as dialects of Japanese, the Ryukyuan languages are today recognized as languages in their own right. However, speakers of Ryukyuan languages have suffered from stigmatization, oppressive language policies and domination from outside the Ryukyu Archipelago. As a result, the Ryukyuan languages are now severely endangered. This volume depicts, roughly in chronological order, aspects which have led to the language crisis in the Ryukyus today. Taking account of these factors is important because endangered languages can only be maintained and revitalized on the basis of a comprehensive understanding of why these languages became endangered in the first place. The chapters of this book have been written by leading experts in Ryukyuan sociolinguistics and the scope encompasses the entire field. It sheds light on the dark side of language modernization, on a misplaced obsession with monolingualism, and on Japan’s difficulties in surmounting its invented self-image.