A History of My Times

A History of My Times

Xenophon's History recounts nearly fifty turbulent years of warfare in Greece between 411 and 362 BC. Continuing the story of the Peloponnesian War at the point where Thucydides finished his magisterial history, this is a fascinating chronicle of the conflicts that ultimately led to the decline of Greece, and the wars with both Thebes and the might of Persia. An Athenian by birth, Xenophon became a firm supporter of the Spartan cause, and fought against the Athenians in the battle of Coronea. Combining history and memoir, this is a brilliant account of the triumphs and failures of city-states, and a portrait of Greece at a time of crisis.

A History of Pergamum

Beyond Hellenistic Kingship

A History of Pergamum

The Kingdom of Pergamum emerged from the great period of instability which followed the death of Alexander the Great. Over the next century Pergamum was to become one of the wealthiest states in the eastern Mediterranean. The state of Pergamum was incorporated into the Roman Empire between 133/129 BCE and it eventually became Rome's wealthiest province. The whole of Asia Minor suffered in the civil wars which ended the Roman Republic, and Pergamum did not escape the exactions demanded of the Greek cities by Pompey, Caesar and Antony. In the subsequent peace, ushered in by Augustus, Pergamum regained its prosperity and became one of the cultural centres of the Roman Empire. Its ruling dynasty - the Attalids - were patrons of the arts and while in power were responsible for the remarkable embellishment of their capital at Pergamum. Other more ancient cities such as Ephesus and Miletus also benefited from their government. This volume surveys Pergamum's history from the late Third Century BCE to the Second Century CE.

A History of Equestrian Drama in the United States

Hippodrama’s Pure Air and Fire

A History of Equestrian Drama in the United States

A History of Equestrian Drama in the United States documents the history of equestrian drama in the United States and clarifies the multi-faceted significance of the form and of the related stage machinery developed to produce hippodramas. The development of equestrian drama is traced from its origins and influences in the sixteenth century, through the height of the form’s popularity at the turn of the twentieth century. Analysis of the historical significance of the genre within the larger context of U.S. theatre, the elucidation of the importance of the horse to theatre, and an evaluation of the lasting impact on theatre technology are also included.

The Shaking Woman or A History of My Nerves

Or a History of My Nerves

The Shaking Woman or A History of My Nerves

A revealing and unusal memoir by the bestselling author of What I Loved, an account of her search for the source of her mysterious nervous disorder which offers a fascinating exploration of the mind and its connection with the body – 'provocative but often funny, encyclopedic but down to earth' Oliver Sacks. While speaking at a memorial event for her father, Siri Hustvedt suffered a violent seizure from the neck down. She managed to finish her talk and the paroxysms stopped, but not for good. Again and again she found herself a victim of the shudders. What had happened? Chronicling her search for the shaking woman, Hustvedt takes the reader on a journey into contemporary psychiatry, neurology and psychoanalysis. She unearths stories and theories from the annals of medical history, literature and philosophy, and delves into her own past. In the process, she raises fundamental questions: what is the relationship between mind and body? How do we remember? What is the self? In a seamless synthesis of personal experience and extensive research, Hustvedt conveys the often frightening mysteries of illness and the complexities of diagnosis. As engaging as it is thought-provoking, The Shaking Woman brilliantly illuminates the age-old dilemma of the mental and the physical, and what it means to be human.

Hiero the Tyrant and Other Treatises

Hiero the Tyrant and Other Treatises

One of Socrates' Athenian disciples in his youth, Xenophon (c. 498-354 bc) fought as a mercenary commander in Cyrus the Younger's campaign to seize the Persian throne, and later wrote a wide range of works on history, politics and philosophy. These six treatises offer his informed insights into the nature of leadership. In the dialogue between the poet Simonides and Hiero, tyrant of Syracuse, Xenophon provides a consummate consideration of the burdens of being an absolute dictator and the superior happiness of the private man. Elsewhere, his biography of King Agesilaus II of Sparta depicts the author's patron as a model of piety, justice, courage and wisdom, while other texts consider the essential qualities of the cavalry commander, analyse the skills of the horseman and the hunter, and advance a bold economic plan for democratic Athens.