A Dictionary of Victorian London

An A-Z of the Great Metropolis

A Dictionary of Victorian London

From slums to suburbs, freak-shows to fast food, prisons to pornography, 'A Dictionary of Victorian London' is a fascinating exposé of everyday life in the Great Metropolis of Victorian London. Compiling authentic nineteenth-century voices from a multitude of sources, including advertisements, diaries, court cases, journalism and guidebooks, Lee Jackson paints a unique picture of life in a vibrant and diverse city in an alphabetical guide. With striking contemporary illustrations throughout, this is a must-read for anyone interested in the remarkable history of London and the enthralling lives of the Victorians.

Dirty Old London

The Victorian Fight Against Filth

Dirty Old London

In Victorian London, filth was everywhere: horse traffic filled the streets with dung, household rubbish went uncollected, cesspools brimmed with "night soil," graveyards teemed with rotting corpses, the air itself was choked with smoke. In this intimately visceral book, Lee Jackson guides us through the underbelly of the Victorian metropolis, introducing us to the men and women who struggled to stem a rising tide of pollution and dirt, and the forces that opposed them. Through thematic chapters, Jackson describes how Victorian reformers met with both triumph and disaster. Full of individual stories and overlooked details--from the dustmen who grew rich from recycling, to the peculiar history of the public toilet--this riveting book gives us a fresh insight into the minutiae of daily life and the wider challenges posed by the unprecedented growth of the Victorian capital.

Dickens's Dictionary of London, 1888

An Unconventional Handbook

Dickens's Dictionary of London, 1888

A Victorian guidebook which captures the atmosphere of London. The churches, railway stations, banks, theatres and sporting facilities are all detailed. Tips on social behaviour are also provided, including advice on hiring servants and how to cope with milk contaminated with diptheria and typhoid.

Victorian Painters: The text

Victorian Painters: The text

There is no doubt that the first edition of this Dictionary, published in 1971 as The Dictionary of Victorian Painters, put Victorian painting on the map, and its subsequent two revisions and eight reprints only go to reinforce the fact that it is the ac

The Wiley-Blackwell Dictionary of Modern European History Since 1789

The Wiley-Blackwell Dictionary of Modern European History Since 1789

The Wiley-Blackwell Dictionary of Modern European History Since 1789 is an authoritative and accessible reference guide to the major people, events, and issues that have shaped the development of Europe from the French Revolution to the present day. Features almost a thousand alphabetical entries on modern European history Offers extensive cross-references to enhance clarity and reveal historical links and connections, and a series of maps charting the evolution of modern European states Covers the whole of continental Europe, as well as relevant aspects of the British experience Written by a trio of distinguished historians of the period

City of Dreadful Delight

Narratives of Sexual Danger in Late-Victorian London

City of Dreadful Delight

From tabloid exposes of child prostitution to the grisly tales of Jack the Ripper, narratives of sexual danger pulsated through Victorian London. Expertly blending social history and cultural criticism, Judith Walkowitz shows how these narratives reveal the complex dramas of power, politics, and sexuality that were being played out in late nineteenth-century Britain, and how they influenced the language of politics, journalism, and fiction. Victorian London was a world where long-standing traditions of class and gender were challenged by a range of public spectacles, mass media scandals, new commercial spaces, and a proliferation of new sexual categories and identities. In the midst of this changing culture, women of many classes challenged the traditional privileges of elite males and asserted their presence in the public domain. An important catalyst in this conflict, argues Walkowitz, was W. T. Stead's widely read 1885 article about child prostitution. Capitalizing on the uproar caused by the piece and the volatile political climate of the time, women spoke of sexual danger, articulating their own grievances against men, inserting themselves into the public discussion of sex to an unprecedented extent, and gaining new entree to public spaces and journalistic practices. The ultimate manifestation of class anxiety and gender antagonism came in 1888 with the tabloid tales of Jack the Ripper. In between, there were quotidien stories of sexual possibility and urban adventure, and Walkowitz examines them all, showing how women were not simply figures in the imaginary landscape of male spectators, but also central actors in the stories of metropolotin life that reverberated in courtrooms, learned journals, drawing rooms, street corners, and in the letters columns of the daily press. A model of cultural history, this ambitious book will stimulate and enlighten readers across a broad range of interests.

London Labour and the London Poor

A Cyclopaedia of the Condition and Earnings of Those that Will Work, Those that Cannot Work, and Those that Will Not Work

London Labour and the London Poor

"A seminal study of London street life in the middle of the [19th] century ... [with] details of Victorian lower-class life, such as what kinds of foods were sold on the streets, how financial transactions with street-sellers were conducted, and how vendors 'cried' their wares ... The study had its origin in a series of eighty-two articles, published from October 1849 through December 1850, entitled 'Labour and the poor', in the Morning Chronicle ..."--Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.

Victorian Biography Reconsidered

A Study of Nineteenth-Century 'Hidden' Lives

Victorian Biography Reconsidered

Victorian Biography Reconsidered seeks to overthrow deep-seated preconceptions about Victorian biography by demonstrating that, long before our current cultural preoccupation with the lives of neglected or unknown men and women, Victorian biographers sought to bring such subjects to public attention. Through an examination of numerous biographies, from the lives of working-class scientists to minor women writers, this book examines how and whynineteenth-century biographers challenged the contemporary obsession with 'Great Men'. What emerges is that biographers were eager to take on the role of cultural mediator, which helped them assert their importance at a time when the status of men of letters and the nature of the reading public were undergoing profoundchanges. Most surprisingly of all, they showed comparatively little interest in conferring immortality on their subjects, but were more interested in stimulating a feeling of gratitude for hidden labour, both manual and intellectual, that sustained the nation.

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music

This quick reference book of musical terminology includes brief biographical sketches of musicians, composers, vocalists, and conductors.