The Autobiographical Demand of Place

Curriculum Inquiry in the American South

The Autobiographical Demand of Place

Place is central to the study of the American South. The question of the meaning and power of place underpinned the earliest efforts to define and understand the region, and place remains a crucial concept in an ongoing process of regional identification and inquiry. This book examines Southern place autobiographically, historically, and theoretically in order to illuminate the subjective and social dimensions of place and to promote progressive conversation in the region. Using the interpretive tools of psychoanalysis to take account of the autobiographical roots of knowledge and society, Brian Casemore conceptualizes curriculum inquiry in the American South as a response to the complex role of place in self-formation. If we accept that place is ideological as well as physically dimensional - that it is created in the mind as well as the landscape - we have an opportunity to explore it as it emerges, laden with personal and public meaning.

Place, Race, and Identity Formation

Autobiographical Intersections in a Curriculum Theorist's Daily Life

Place, Race, and Identity Formation

In this work of curriculum theory, Ed Douglas McKnight addresses and explores the intersections between place (with specific discussion of Kincheloe’s and Pinar’s conceptualization of place and identity) and race (specifically Winthrop Jordan’s historical analysis of race as an Anglo-European construction that became the foundation of a white mythos). To that end, he employs a form of narrative construction called curriculum vitae (course of life)—a method of locating and delineating identity formation which addresses how theories of place, race and identity formation play out in a particular concrete life. By working through how place racializes identity and existence, the author engages in a long Southern tradition of storytelling, but in a way that turns it inside out. Instead of telling his own story as a means to romanticize the sins of the southern past, he tells a new story of growing up within the "white" discourse of the Deep South in the 1960s and 70s, tracking how his racial identity was created and how it has followed him through life. Significant in this narrative is how the discourse of whiteness and place continues to express itself even within the subject position of a curriculum theorist teaching in a large Deep South university. The book concludes with an elaboration on the challenges of engaging in the necessary anti-racist complicated conversation within education to begin to work through and cope with heavy racialized inheritances.

An Indigenous Curriculum of Place

The United Houma Nation's Contentious Relationship with Louisiana's Educational Institutions

An Indigenous Curriculum of Place

This book illustrates how the Louisiana state apparatus historically dictated educational exclusion through its infamous Jim Crow policies of racial segregation.

Curriculum and Teaching Dialogue

Vol. 8 # 1 & 2

Curriculum and Teaching Dialogue

Editorial Review Board: Lynne Bailey, University of North Carolina—Charlotte. Robert Boostrom, University of Southern Indiana. Monica Brown, University of the West Indies. Susan Brown, University of Central Florida. India Broyles, University of New England. Lynn M. Burlbaw, Texas A & M University. Jennifer Deets. Robert Donmoyer, University of San Diego. Moira Fallon, SUNY—College at Brockport. Lyn Forester, Doane College. Jeffrey Kaplan, University of Central Florida. J. Randall Koetting, Marian College. Karen Riley, Auburn University at Montgomery. Judith J. Slater, Florida International University, Julia D. Sweeny, James Madison University. Jeanne L. Tunks, University of North Texas. Editorial Advisory Board: Michael Apple, University of Wisconsin—Madison. Thomas Barone, Arizona State University. D. Jean Clandinin, University of Alberta, Canada. Elliot Eisner, Stanford University. Steve Selden, University of Maryland at College Park. William F. Pinar, University of British Columbia.

Bringing School to Life

Place-Based Education Across the Curriculum

Bringing School to Life

Bringing School to Life: Place-Based Education across the Curriculum offers insights into how to build a program across the K-8 grades. Anderson addresses key elements such as mapping, local history, citizen science, and integrated curricula. She suggests strategies for building community partnerships and implementation for primary grades.

Curriculum as Social Psychoanalysis

The Significance of Place

Curriculum as Social Psychoanalysis

Contemporary curriculum discourses include historical, political, and autobiographical understandings -- all important in the effort to read critically the educational act. The authors of this volume introduce the notion of "place" to the study of curriculum, focusing on the "southern place" to ground and illustrate this form of analysis. Curriculum that recognizes the significance of place, that situates itself geographically, extends the social psychoanalytic methodology and concretizes its emancipatory intent.

The Place of Narrative in the Early Years Curriculum

How the Tale Unfolds

The Place of Narrative in the Early Years Curriculum

Narrative in the Early Years Curriculum offers a timely new perspective on the place of narrative in the early years curriculum. Applying the results of up-to-date psychological research to day-to-day practice in pre-schools, day nurseries, schools and out of school play care settings, the author help readers to understand just what it is that makes so many story books produced for pre-school children in recent years a success and what deeper purposes they serve. Offering helpful advice on what works, the book shows how good practice based on practical experience is underpinned and clarified by research findings. Furthermore, it illustrates that an understanding of the development of narrative competence can challenge current ideas on various areas of early years practice, including child protection, health and safety and the consultation of children.

Narrative and Experience in Multicultural Education

Narrative and Experience in Multicultural Education

Narrative and Experience in Multicultural Education explores the untapped potential that narrative and experiential approaches have for understanding multicultural issues in education. The research featured in the book reflects an exciting new way of thinking about human experience. The studies focus on the lives of students, teachers, parents, and communities, highlighting experiences seldom discussed in the literature. Most importantly, the work emphasizes the understanding of experience and transforming this understanding into social and educational significance.

Place-based Curriculum and Instruction

Outdoor and Environmental Education Approaches

Place-based Curriculum and Instruction