25 Remedies for the Sick

25 Remedies for the Sick

Sickness washes away the dirt of sins like soap, and cleanses. It is established in an authenticated hadith that illnesses are expiation for sins. It says, "As ripe fruits fall from the tree when it is shaken, so the sins of a believer fall away with the shaking during illness".

A Treatise on the Police of the Metropolis

Containing a Detail of the Various Crimes and Misdemeanors by which Public and Private Property and Security Are, at Present, Injured and Endangered: and Suggesting Remedies for Their Prevention

A Treatise on the Police of the Metropolis


Annual Review of Nursing Research, Volume 25, 2007

Vulnerable Populations

Annual Review of Nursing Research, Volume 25, 2007

This 25th anniversary edition of the Annual Review of Nursing Research is focused on nursing science in vulnerable populations. Identified as a priority in the nursing discipline, vulnerable populations are discussed in terms of the development of nursing science, diverse approaches in building the state of the science research, integrating biologic methods in the research, and research in reducing health disparities. Topics include: Measurement issues Prevention of infectious diseases among vulnerable populations Genomics and proteomics methodologies for research Promoting culturally appropriate interventions Community-academic research partnerships with vulnerable populations Vulnerable populations in Thailand: women living with HIV/AIDS As in all volumes of the Annual Reviews, leading nurse researchers provide students, other researchers, and clinicians with the foundations for evidence-based practice and further research.

Generic

The Unbranding of Modern Medicine

Generic

Generic drugs are now familiar objects in clinics, drugstores, and households around the world. We like to think of these tablets, capsules, patches, and ointments as interchangeable with their brand-name counterparts: why pay more for the same? And yet they are not quite the same. They differ in price, in place of origin, in color, shape, and size, in the dyes, binders, fillers, and coatings used, and in a host of other ways. Claims of generic equivalence, as physician-historian Jeremy Greene reveals in this gripping narrative, are never based on being identical to the original drug in all respects, but in being the same in all ways that matter. How do we know what parts of a pill really matter? Decisions about which differences are significant and which are trivial in the world of therapeutics are not resolved by simple chemical or biological assays alone. As Greene reveals in this fascinating account, questions of therapeutic similarity and difference are also always questions of pharmacology and physiology, of economics and politics, of morality and belief. Generic is the first book to chronicle the social, political, and cultural history of generic drugs in America. It narrates the evolution of the generic drug industry from a set of mid-twentieth-century "schlock houses" and "counterfeiters" into an agile and surprisingly powerful set of multinational corporations in the early twenty-first century. The substitution of bioequivalent generic drugs for more expensive brand-name products is a rare success story in a field of failed attempts to deliver equivalent value in health care for a lower price. Greene’s history sheds light on the controversies shadowing the success of generics: problems with the generalizability of medical knowledge, the fragile role of science in public policy, and the increasing role of industry, marketing, and consumer logics in late-twentieth-century and early twenty-first century health care.

The Doctors Book of Home Remedies

Quick Fixes, Clever Techniques, and Uncommon Cures to Get You Feeling Better Fast

The Doctors Book of Home Remedies

What do doctors do when they get sick? The editors of Prevention Magazine Health Books asked more than 500 of the nations top specialists to recommend their best doctor-tested and easy-to-follow remedies for 138 illnesses and maladies. This complete, practical guide contains the distilled experience of health professionals who offer more than 2300 accessible healing tips for the most common medical complaints. In this handy reference you will find curative techniques and symptom-relieving treatments for bladder infections, depression, emphysema, headaches, premenstrual syndrome, toothaches, and much more. Here are invaluable at-home solutions for annoying afflictions such as canker sores, dandruff, and snoring as well as methods for coping with more serious health problems such as high cholesterol, ulcers, and backaches. The Doctors Book Of Home Remedies is like having a doctor on call 24 hours a day. So treat yourself to this prescription for health and stay well.

The Chickasaws

The Chickasaws

For 350 years the Chickasaws-one of the Five Civilized Tribes-made a sustained effort to preserve their tribal institutions and independence in the face of increasing encroachments by white men. This is the first book-length account of their valiant-but doomed-struggle. Against an ethnohistorical background, the author relates the story of the Chickasaws from their first recorded contacts with Europeans in the lower Mississippi Valley in 1540 to final dissolution of the Chickasaw Nation in 1906. Included are the years of alliance with the British, the dealings with the Americans, and the inevitable removal to Indian Territory (Oklahoma) in 1837 under pressure from settlers in Mississippi and Alabama. Among the significant events in Chickasaw history were the tribe’s surprisingly strong alliance with the South during the Civil War and the federal actions thereafter which eventually resulted in the absorption of the Chickasaw Nation into the emerging state of Oklahoma.

Parliamentary Papers

Parliamentary Papers


The Complete Idiot's Guide to Natural Remedies

The Complete Idiot's Guide to Natural Remedies

It's amazing what a little peppermint and a couple of walnuts can do. The health conditions? Everything from heart disease, cancer, and migraines to insomnia, PMS, and allergies. The remedies? Fish oils, peppermint, lavender, blueberry yogurt, and old-fashioned vitamin C. This is a complete reference book for readers who want scientifically researched recommendations for the best all-natural treatments for specific conditions presented in an easy-to-follow format. - Covers complaints and ailments from high blood pressure to bug bites - Each treatment based on the latest scientific research - Includes natural remedies from herbs and supplements to traditional Chinese Medicine - Arranged by specific ailment or disorder

Plain Talk to the Sick

With Directions for Homoeopathic Treatment and General Rules for the Preservation of Health. Also an Appendix on the Diseases of Women, Containing an Exposé of the Impositions Practiced Upon Innocent Sufferers by Men in High Places

Plain Talk to the Sick


The Nature of Suffering and the Goals of Medicine

The Nature of Suffering and the Goals of Medicine

This is a revised and expanded edtion of a classic in palliative medicine, originally published in 1991. With three added chapters and a new preface summarizing our progress in the area of pain management, this is a must-hve for those in palliative medicine and hospice care. The obligation of physicians to relieve human suffering stretches back into antiquity. But what exactly, is suffering? One patient with metastic cancer of the stomach, from which he knew he would shortly die, said he was not suffering. Another, someone who had been operated on for a mior problem--in little pain and not seemingly distressed--said that even coming into the hospital had been a source of pain and not suffering. With such varied responses to the problem of suffering, inevitable questions arise. Is it the doctor's responsibility to treat the disease or the patient? And what is the relationship between suffering and the goals of medicine? According to Dr. Eric Cassell, these are crucial questions, but unfortunately, have remained only queries void of adequate solutions. It is time for the sick person, Cassell believes, to be not merely an important concern for physicians but the central focus of medicine. With this in mind, Cassell argues for an understanding of what changes should be made in order to successfully treat the sick while alleviating suffering, and how to actually go about making these changes with the methods and training techniques firmly rooted in the doctor's relationship with the patient. Dr. Cassell offers an incisive critique of the approach of modern medicine. Drawing on a number of evocative patient narratives, he writes that the goal of medicine must be to treat an individual's suffering, and not just the disease. In addition, Cassell's thoughtful and incisive argument will appeal to psychologists and psychiatrists interested in the nature of pain and suffering.