the man who knew too much

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The Man Who Knew Too Much

Author : Gilbert Keith Chesterton
ISBN : HARVARD:32044083039263
Genre : Aristocracy (Social class)
File Size : 32. 86 MB
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The Man Who Knew Too Much Alan Turing And The Invention Of The Computer Great Discoveries

Author : David Leavitt
ISBN : 9780393329094
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 67. 35 MB
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Outlines the Bletchley Park mathematician's efforts to launch artificial intelligence innovations, describing his thwarted attempts to gain support for a programmable calculating machine, his contributions to cracking the Nazi Enigma code during World War II, and how the revelation of his homosexuality led to his tragic imprisonment and suicide. Reprint.

Alfred Hitchcock

Author : Michael Wood
ISBN : 054445622X
Genre : BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY
File Size : 32. 61 MB
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Provides a compact study of the famed director's life and career, combining biography and criticism.

The Man Who Knew Too Much

Author : G. K. Chesterton
ISBN : 1540845141
Genre :
File Size : 33. 39 MB
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Why buy our paperbacks? Standard Font size of 10 for all books High Quality Paper Fulfilled by Amazon Expedited shipping 30 Days Money Back Guarantee BEWARE of Low-quality sellers Don't buy cheap paperbacks just to save a few dollars. Most of them use low-quality papers & binding. Their pages fall off easily. Some of them even use very small font size of 6 or less to increase their profit margin. It makes their books completely unreadable. How is this book unique? Unabridged (100% Original content) Font adjustments & biography included Illustrated About The Man Who Knew Too Much by Gilbert Keith Chesterton The Man Who Knew Too Much is a compilation of eight detective stories by the English philosopher and prolific writer Gilbert Keith Chesterton. The protagonist of these stories is the man of the title, Horne Fisher, an upper-class detective whose investigative gifts often put him in uncomfortable situations where he has to take difficult decisions. In stories like "The Face in the Target" and "The Vengeance of the Statue," which are all told by a third-person narrator, Fisher uses his deductive faculties and theatrical representations to absolve the innocent and incriminate the guilty. Most of the crimes dealt with in these stories are about mysterious murders. Yet, Fisher has also to solve other cases related to theft as well as to disputes over money and estates. Due to his friendly or family relationships with influential statesmen, Fisher often finds himself with "too much" knowledge about the way things are run in the country. This paradoxically valuable and embarrassing knowledge forces him many a time to let the murderer get away with his crime in order to avoid something more dangerous to happen to the country such as war or rebellion.

The Man Who Knew Too Much

Author : Perseus
ISBN : 0786712422
Genre : History
File Size : 85. 59 MB
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A fascinating twist on the assassination of JFK explores the life and times of Richard Nagell, a man who insisted that he had been hired to kill Oswald and then spent years in prison trying to prove that he was sane. Reprint.

The Man Who Knew Too Much Alan Turing And The Invention Of The Computer Great Discoveries

Author : David Leavitt
ISBN : 9780393346572
Genre : Computers
File Size : 57. 79 MB
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A "skillful and literate" (New York Times Book Review) biography of the persecuted genius who helped create the modern computer. To solve one of the great mathematical problems of his day, Alan Turing proposed an imaginary computer. Then, attempting to break a Nazi code during World War II, he successfully designed and built one, thus ensuring the Allied victory. Turing became a champion of artificial intelligence, but his work was cut short. As an openly gay man at a time when homosexuality was illegal in England, he was convicted and forced to undergo a humiliating "treatment" that may have led to his suicide. With a novelist's sensitivity, David Leavitt portrays Turing in all his humanity—his eccentricities, his brilliance, his fatal candor—and elegantly explains his work and its implications.

Peroff

Author : L. H. Whittemore
ISBN : 0688029345
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 73. 92 MB
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The Man Who Knew Too Much

Author : G. K. Chesterton
ISBN :
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 55. 22 MB
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Harold March, the rising reviewer and social critic, was walking vigorously across a great tableland of moors and commons, the horizon of which was fringed with the far-off woods of the famous estate of Torwood Park. He was a good-looking young man in tweeds, with very pale curly hair and pale clear eyes. Walking in wind and sun in the very landscape of liberty, he was still young enough to remember his politics and not merely try to forget them. For his errand at Torwood Park was a political one; it was the place of appointment named by no less a person than the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Sir Howard Horne, then introducing his so-called Socialist budget, and prepared to expound it in an interview with so promising a penman. Harold March was the sort of man who knows everything about politics, and nothing about politicians. He also knew a great deal about art, letters, philosophy, and general culture; about almost everything, indeed, except the world he was living in. Abruptly, in the middle of those sunny and windy flats, he came upon a sort of cleft almost narrow enough to be called a crack in the land. It was just large enough to be the water-course for a small stream which vanished at intervals under green tunnels of undergrowth, as if in a dwarfish forest. Indeed, he had an odd feeling as if he were a giant looking over the valley of the pygmies. When he dropped into the hollow, however, the impression was lost; the rocky banks, though hardly above the height of a cottage, hung over and had the profile of a precipice. As he began to wander down the course of the stream, in idle but romantic curiosity, and saw the water shining in short strips between the great gray boulders and bushes as soft as great green mosses, he fell into quite an opposite vein of fantasy. It was rather as if the earth had opened and swallowed him into a sort of underworld of dreams. And when he became conscious of a human figure dark against the silver stream, sitting on a large boulder and looking rather like a large bird, it was perhaps with some of the premonitions proper to a man who meets the strangest friendship of his life.

The Man Who Knew

Author : Sebastian Mallaby
ISBN : 9780698170018
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 78. 74 MB
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The definitive biography of the most important economic statesman of our time Sebastian Mallaby's magisterial biography of Alan Greenspan, the product of over five years of research based on untrammeled access to his subject and his closest professional and personal intimates, brings into vivid focus the mysterious point where the government and the economy meet. To understand Greenspan's story is to see the economic and political landscape of the last 30 years--and the presidency from Reagan to George W. Bush--in a whole new light. As the most influential economic statesman of his age, Greenspan spent a lifetime grappling with a momentous shift: the transformation of finance from the fixed and regulated system of the post-war era to the free-for-all of the past quarter century. The story of Greenspan is also the story of the making of modern finance, for good and for ill. Greenspan's life is a quintessential American success story: raised by a single mother in the Jewish émigré community of Washington Heights, he was a math prodigy who found a niche as a stats-crunching consultant. A master at explaining the economic weather to captains of industry, he translated that skill into advising Richard Nixon in his 1968 campaign. This led to a perch on the White House Council of Economic Advisers, and then to a dazzling array of business and government roles, from which the path to the Fed was relatively clear. A fire-breathing libertarian and disciple of Ayn Rand in his youth who once called the Fed's creation a historic mistake, Mallaby shows how Greenspan reinvented himself as a pragmatist once in power. In his analysis, and in his core mission of keeping inflation in check, he was a maestro indeed, and hailed as such. At his retirement in 2006, he was lauded as the age's necessary man, the veritable God in the machine, the global economy's avatar. His memoirs sold for record sums to publishers around the world. But then came 2008. Mallaby's story lands with both feet on the great crash which did so much to damage Alan Greenspan's reputation. Mallaby argues that the conventional wisdom is off base: Greenspan wasn't a naïve ideologue who believed greater regulation was unnecessary. He had pressed for greater regulation of some key areas of finance over the years, and had gotten nowhere. To argue that he didn't know the risks in irrational markets is to miss the point. He knew more than almost anyone; the question is why he didn't act, and whether anyone else could or would have. A close reading of Greenspan's life provides fascinating answers to these questions, answers whose lessons we would do well to heed. Because perhaps Mallaby's greatest lesson is that economic statesmanship, like political statesmanship, is the art of the possible. The Man Who Knew is a searching reckoning with what exactly comprised the art, and the possible, in the career of Alan Greenspan. From the Hardcover edition.

Hitchcock The Anxiety Of Authorship

Author : Leslie H. Abramson
ISBN : 9781137309709
Genre : Performing Arts
File Size : 57. 87 MB
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Hitchcock and the Anxiety of Authorship examines issues of cinema authorship engaged by and dynamized within the director's films. A unique study of self-reflexivity in Hitchcock's work from his earliest English silents to his final Hollywood features, this book considers how the director's releases constitute ever-shifting meditations on the conditions and struggles of creative agency in cinema. Abramson explores how, located in literal and emblematic sites of dramatic production, exhibition, and reception, and populated by figures of directors, actors, and audiences, Hitchcock's films exhibit a complicated, often disturbing vision of authorship - one that consistently problematizes rather than exemplifies the director's longstanding auteurist image. Viewing Hitchcock in a striking new light, Abramson analyzes these allegories of vexed agency in the context of his concepts of and commentary on the troubled association between cinema artistry and authorship, as well as the changing cultural, industrial, theoretical, and historical milieus in which his features were produced. Accordingly, the book illuminates how Hitchcock and his cinema register the constant dynamics that constitute film authorship.

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