the intellectual construction of america exceptionalism and identity from 1492 to 1800

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The Intellectual Construction Of America

Author : Jack P. Greene
ISBN : 9780807861776
Genre : History
File Size : 56. 40 MB
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Jack Greene explores the changing definitions of America from the time of Europe's first contact with the New World through the establishment of the American republic. Challenging historians who have argued that colonial American societies differed little from those of early modern Europe, he shows that virtually all contemporary observers emphasized the distinctiveness of the new worlds being created in America. Rarely considering the high costs paid by Amerindians and Africans in the construction of those worlds, they cited the British North American colonies as evidence that America was for free people a place of exceptional opportunities for individual betterment and was therefore fundamentally different from the Old World. Greene suggests that this concept of American societies as exceptional was a central component in their emerging identity. The success of the American Revolution helped subordinate Americans' long-standing sense of cultural inferiority to a more positive sense of collective self that sharpened and intensified the concept of American exceptionalism.

American Exceptionalism

Author : Timothy Roberts
ISBN : 9781351576901
Genre : History
File Size : 66. 95 MB
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American exceptionalism ? the idea that America is fundamentally distinct from other nations ? is a philosophy that has dominated economics, politics, religion and culture for two centuries. This collection of primary source material seeks to understand how this belief began, how it developed and why it remains popular.

Reconstruction Und Wiederaufbau In Deutschland Und Den Vereinigten Staaten Von Amerika 1865 1945 Und 1989

Author : Norbert Finzsch
ISBN : 3515068570
Genre : History
File Size : 38. 82 MB
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ma�nahmen in den Vereinigten Staaten nach dem Buergerkrieg von 1861 bis 1865 sowie in Deutschland nach 1945 und 1989. Beiden Staaten ist gemeinsam, da� gesellschaftliche Rekonstruktionsma�nahmen notwendig wurden, um die Reste der undemokratischen bzw. totalit�ren Regime zu beseitigen, die den Sueden der USA bis 1865, Deutschland bis 1945 und die DDR bis 1989 beherrschten. Gemeinsam ist es beiden Staaten nach 1865 und nach 1945 ebenfalls, da� die neue Ordnung nicht von innen und aus eigener Kraft heraus etabliert werden konnte, sondern nach der milit�rischen Niederlage in einem Buerger- bzw. Weltkrieg unter dem Schutz der Besatzungstruppen durchgesetzt werden sollte. Die Problemzusammenh�nge der vergleichenden historischen Theorie, der Wirtschafts- und Sozialgeschichte, der Verfolgung der politisch belasteten Tr�ger des unterlegenen Systems, der Parteiengeschichte und der nationalen Identit�t werden er�rtert. Zum Schlu� wird der Reconstruction und dem Wiederaufbau in den politischen Karikaturen der jeweiligen Epoche nachgegangen. Eine Auswahlbibliographie schlie�t den Band ab.

American Exceptionalism

Author : Hilde Eliassen Restad
ISBN : 9781135048594
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 88. 30 MB
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How does American exceptionalism shape American foreign policy? Conventional wisdom states that American exceptionalism comes in two variations – the exemplary version and the missionary version. Being exceptional, experts in U.S. foreign policy argue, means that you either withdraw from the world like an isolated but inspiring "city upon a hill," or that you are called upon to actively lead the rest of the world to a better future. In her book, Hilde Eliassen Restad challenges this assumption, arguing that U.S. history has displayed a remarkably constant foreign policy tradition, which she labels unilateral internationalism. The United States, Restad argues, has not vacillated between an "exemplary" and a "missionary" identity. Instead, the United States developed an exceptionalist identity that, while idealizing the United States as an exemplary "city upon a hill," more often than not errs on the side of the missionary crusade in its foreign policy. Utilizing the latest historiography in the study of U.S. foreign relations, the book updates political science scholarship and sheds new light on the role American exceptionalism has played – and continues to play – in shaping America’s role in the world. This work will be of great interest to students and scholars of US foreign policy, security studies, and American politics.

Assumed Identities

Author : John D. Garrigus
ISBN : 9781603441926
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 79. 87 MB
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With the recent election of the nation’s first African American president—an individual of blended Kenyan and American heritage who spent his formative years in Hawaii and Indonesia—the topic of transnational identity is reaching the forefront of the national consciousness in an unprecedented way. As our society becomes increasingly diverse and intermingled, it is increasingly imperative to understand how race and heritage impact our perceptions of and interactions with each other. Assumed Identities constitutes an important step in this direction. However, “identity is a slippery concept,” say the editors of this instructive volume. This is nowhere more true than in the melting pot of the early trans-Atlantic cultures formed in the colonial New World during the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. As the studies in this volume show, during this period in the trans-Atlantic world individuals and groups fashioned their identities but also had identities ascribed to them by surrounding societies. The historians who have contributed to this volume investigate these processes of multiple identity formation, as well as contemporary understandings of them. Originating in the 2007 Walter Prescott Webb Memorial Lectures presented at the University of Texas at Arlington, Assumed Identities: The Meanings of Race in the Atlantic World examines, among other topics, perceptions of racial identity in the Chesapeake community, in Brazil, and in Saint-Domingue (colonial-era Haiti). As the contributors demonstrate, the cultures in which these studies are sited helped define the subjects’ self-perceptions and the ways others related to them.

British Atlantic World Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

Author : Oxford University Press
ISBN : 0199808236
Genre : History
File Size : 83. 26 MB
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This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of the ancient world find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated. This ebook is just one of many articles from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Atlantic History, a continuously updated and growing online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through the scholarship and other materials relevant to the study of Atlantic History, the study of the transnational interconnections between Europe, North America, South America, and Africa, particularly in the early modern and colonial period. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.oxfordbibliographies.com.

Between Two Worlds

Author : Malcolm Gaskill
ISBN : 9780191653834
Genre : History
File Size : 40. 56 MB
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Between Two Worlds is a story teeming with people on the move, making decisions, indulging or resisting their desires and dreams. In the seventeenth century a quarter of a million men, women, and children left England's shores for America. Some were explorers and merchants, others soldiers and missionaries; many were fugitives from poverty and persecution. All, in their own way, were adventurers, risking their lives and fortunes to make something of themselves overseas. They irrevocably changed the land and indigenous peoples they encountered - and their new world changed them. But that was only half the story. The plantations established from Maine to the Caribbean needed support at home, especially royal endorsement and money, which made adventurers of English monarchs and investors too. Attitudes to America were crucial, and evolved as the colonies grew in size, prosperity, and self-confidence. Meanwhile, for those who had crossed the ocean, America forced people to rethink the country in which they had been raised, and to which they remained attached after emigration. In tandem with new ideas about the New World, migrants pondered their English mother country's traditions and achievements, its problems and its uncertain future in an age of war and revolution. Using hundreds of letters, journals, reports, pamphlets and contemporary books, Between Two Worlds recreates this fascinating transatlantic history - one which has often been neglected or misunderstood on both sides of the Atlantic in the centuries since.

Exclusionary Empire

Author : Jack P. Greene
ISBN : 9780521114981
Genre : History
File Size : 45. 13 MB
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Consisting of an introduction and ten chapters written by noted experts, Exclusionary Empire examines the transfer of English traditions of liberty and the rule of law overseas from 1600 to 1900. The essays examine the ways in which the polities in each of these areas incorporated English traditions and the extent to which these traditions were confined to the independent male segments of society.

Religion In America

Author : Denis Lacorne
ISBN : 9780231526401
Genre : Religion
File Size : 42. 23 MB
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Denis Lacorne identifies two competing narratives defining the American identity. The first narrative, derived from the philosophy of the Enlightenment, is essentially secular. Associated with the Founding Fathers and reflected in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Federalist Papers, this line of reasoning is predicated on separating religion from politics to preserve political freedom from an overpowering church. Prominent thinkers such as Voltaire, Thomas Paine, and Jean-Nicolas Démeunier, who viewed the American project as a radical attempt to create a new regime free from religion and the weight of ancient history, embraced this American effort to establish a genuine "wall of separation" between church and state. The second narrative is based on the premise that religion is a fundamental part of the American identity and emphasizes the importance of the original settlement of America by New England Puritans. This alternative vision was elaborated by Whig politicians and Romantic historians in the first half of the nineteenth century. It is still shared by modern political scientists such as Samuel Huntington. These thinkers insist America possesses a core, stable "Creed" mixing Protestant and republican values. Lacorne outlines the role of religion in the making of these narratives and examines, against this backdrop, how key historians, philosophers, novelists, and intellectuals situate religion in American politics.

Runaway America

Author : David Waldstreicher
ISBN : 9781466821521
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 58. 46 MB
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Scientist, abolitionist, revolutionary: that is the Benjamin Franklin we know and celebrate. To this description, the talented young historian David Waldstreicher shows we must add runaway, slave master, and empire builder. But Runaway America does much more than revise our image of a beloved founding father. Finding slavery at the center of Franklin's life, Waldstreicher proves it was likewise central to the Revolution, America's founding, and the very notion of freedom we associate with both. Franklin was the sole Founding Father who was once owned by someone else and was among the few to derive his fortune from slavery. As an indentured servant, Franklin fled his master before his term was complete; as a struggling printer, he built a financial empire selling newspapers that not only advertised the goods of a slave economy (not to mention slaves) but also ran the notices that led to the recapture of runaway servants. Perhaps Waldstreicher's greatest achievement is in showing that this was not an ironic outcome but a calculated one. America's freedom, no less than Franklin's, demanded that others forgo liberty. Through the life of Franklin, Runaway America provides an original explanation to the paradox of American slavery and freedom.

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