new eyes on the sun a guide to satellite images and amateur observation astronomers universe

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New Eyes On The Sun

Author : John Wilkinson
ISBN : 9783642228391
Genre : Science
File Size : 67. 80 MB
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Information collected by satellites recently sent by the USA, the European Space Agency, Japan, Germany, the United Kingdom, and Russia to monitor the Sun has changed our knowledge and understanding of the Sun, particularly its effect on Earth. This book presents these findings in a way that will be welcomed by amateur astronomers, students, educators and anyone interested in the Sun. Enhanced by many colour photographs, the book combines newly acquired scientific understanding with detailed descriptions of features visible on the Sun’s surface and in its atmosphere. In the past, observing the Sun has been left to academics with specialised instruments, since solar observation has been unsafe because of the risk of eye damage. This book explains how amateur astronomers can safely observe the various solar phenomena using special hydrogen-alpha telescopes that are not too expensive. Amateurs can now make a positive contribution to science by monitoring the Sun as professionals do. Amateurs can also access the solar images taken by satellites via the internet. This book helps readers interpret and understand what these images are showing about the Sun, including the latest 3D images. Solar observers will enjoy comparing their own solar telescope observations with those produced by space probes such as SDO, SOHO, Hinode and STEREO, and further enjoy learning about transits, eclipses, and space weather and how the Sun compares to other stars in the universe. The main purpose of this book is to present some of the fascinating solar phenomena in their full splendor to readers through a variety of illustrations, photographs and easy to understand text.p/p

The Moon And How To Observe It

Author : Peter Grego
ISBN : 9781846282430
Genre : Science
File Size : 89. 94 MB
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This revolutionary new book is written for practical amateur astronomers who not only want to observe, but want to know the details of exactly what they are looking at. The Moon is the most commonly observed of all astronomical objects. This is the first book to deal equally with the Moon itself - its formation, geology, and history - as well as the practical aspects of observation. The concept of the book - and of the series - is to present an up-to-date detailed description of the Moon, including its origins, history, and geology (part one); and then (part two) to consider how best to observe and record it successfully using commercially-available equipment. The Moon and How to Observe It is a mine of information for all levels of amateur observers, from the beginner to the experienced

An Amateur S Guide To Observing And Imaging The Heavens

Author : Ian Morison
ISBN : 9781139917360
Genre : Science
File Size : 46. 79 MB
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An Amateur's Guide to Observing and Imaging the Heavens is a highly comprehensive guidebook that bridges the gap between the beginners' and hobbyists' books and the many specialised and subject-specific texts for more advanced amateur astronomers. Written by an experienced astronomer and educator, the book is a one-stop reference providing extensive information and advice about observing and imaging equipment, with detailed examples showing how best to use them. In addition to providing in-depth knowledge about every type of astronomical telescope and highlighting their strengths and weaknesses, two chapters offer advice on making visual observations of the Sun, Moon, planets, stars and galaxies. All types of modern astronomical imaging are covered, with step-by-step details given on the use of DSLRs and web-cams for solar, lunar and planetary imaging and the use of DSLRs and cooled CCD cameras for deep sky imaging.

Nightwatch

Author : Terence Dickinson
ISBN : 9781552093023
Genre : Nature
File Size : 78. 43 MB
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Offers advice on observing the stars and constellations, discusses useful equipment, and includes information on the moon, comets, eclipses, and planets

Seeing In The Dark

Author : Timothy Ferris
ISBN : 9781476711751
Genre : Science
File Size : 86. 30 MB
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In Seeing in the Dark, a poetic love letter to science and to the skies, Timothy Ferris invites us all to become stargazers. He recounts his own experiences as an enthralled lifelong amateur astronomer and reports from around the globe -- from England and Italy to the Florida Keys and the Chilean Andes -- on the revolution that's putting millions in touch with the night sky. In addition, Ferris offers an authoritative and engaging report on what's out there to be seen -- what Saturn, the Ring nebula, the Silver Coin galaxy, and the Virgo supercluster really are and how to find them. The appendix includes star charts, observing lists, and a guide on how to get involved in astronomy. Ferris takes us inside a major revolution sweeping astronomy, as lone amateur astronomers, in global networks linked by the Internet, make important discoveries that are the envy of the professionals. His ability to describe the wonders of the universe is simply magical, and his enthusiasm for his subject is irresistible.

Observing The Solar System

Author : Gerald North
ISBN : 9781139576697
Genre : Science
File Size : 85. 86 MB
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Written by a well-known and experienced amateur astronomer, this is a practical primer for all aspiring observers of the planets and other Solar System objects. Whether you are a beginner or more advanced astronomer, you will find all you need in this book to help develop your knowledge and skills and move on to the next level of observing. This up-to-date, self-contained guide provides a detailed and wide-ranging background to Solar System astronomy, along with extensive practical advice and resources. Topics covered include: traditional visual observing techniques using telescopes and ancillary equipment; how to go about imaging astronomical bodies; how to conduct measurements and research of scientifically useful quality; the latest observing and imaging techniques. Whether your interests lie in observing aurorae, meteors, the Sun, the Moon, asteroids, comets, or any of the major planets, you will find all you need here to help you get started.

Bad Astronomy

Author : Philip C. Plait
ISBN : 047142207X
Genre : Science
File Size : 21. 41 MB
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Advance praise for Philip Plait s Bad Astronomy "Bad Astronomy is just plain good! Philip Plait clears up every misconception on astronomy and space you never knew you suffered from." --Stephen Maran, Author of Astronomy for Dummies and editor of The Astronomy and Astrophysics Encyclopedia "Thank the cosmos for the bundle of star stuff named Philip Plait, who is the world s leading consumer advocate for quality science in space and on Earth. This important contribution to science will rest firmly on my reference library shelf, ready for easy access the next time an astrologer calls." --Dr. Michael Shermer, Publisher of Skeptic magazine, monthly columnist for Scientific American, and author of The Borderlands of Science "Philip Plait has given us a readable, erudite, informative, useful, and entertaining book. Bad Astronomy is Good Science. Very good science..." --James "The Amazing" Randi, President, James Randi Educational Foundation, and author of An Encyclopedia of Claims, Frauds, and Hoaxes of the Occult and Supernatural "Bad Astronomy is a fun read. Plait is wonderfully witty and educational as he debunks the myths, legends, and 'conspiracies that abound in our society. 'The Truth Is Out There' and it's in this book. I loved it!" --Mike Mullane, Space Shuttle astronaut and author of Do Your Ears Pop in Space?

Astronomy

Author :
ISBN : UCSD:31822022781769
Genre : Astronomy
File Size : 69. 90 MB
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Phillip S Astronomy Encyclopedia A Comprehensive And Authoritative A Z Guide To The Universe Sir Patrick Moore 2002

Author : Octopus Publishing Group
ISBN :
Genre : Science
File Size : 38. 86 MB
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‘Mc’ is treated as if it were spelled ‘Mac’, and certain shortened forms as if spelled out in full (e.g. ‘St’ is treated as ‘Saint’). Entries that have more than one word in the heading are alphabetized as if there were no space between the words. Entries that share the same main heading are in the order of people, places and things. Entries beginning with numerals are treated as if the numerals were spelled out (e.g. 3C follows three-body problem and precedes 3C 273). An exception is made for HI region and HII region, which appear together immediately after Hirayama family. Biographies are alphabetized by surname, with first names following the comma. (Forenames are placed in parentheses if the one by which a person is commonly known is not the first.) Certain lunar and planetary features appear under the main element of names (e.g. Imbrium, Mare rather than Mare Imbrium). Cross-references SMALL CAPITALS in an article indicate a separate entry that defines and explains the word or subject capitalized. ‘See also’ at the end of an article directs the reader to entries that contain additional relevant information. Measurements Measurements are given in metric (usually SI) units, with an imperial conversion (to an appropriate accuracy) following in parentheses where appropriate. In historical contexts this convention is reversed so that, for example, the diameter of an early telescope is given first in inches. Densities, given in grams per cubic centimetre, are not converted, and neither are kilograms or tonnes. Large astronomical distances are usually given in light-years, but parsecs are sometimes used in a cosmological context. Particularly in tables, large numbers may be given in exponential form. Thus 103 is a thousand, 2 106 is two million, and so on. ‘Billion’ always means a thousand million, or 109. As is customary in astronomy, dates are expressed in the order year, month, day. Details of units of measurement, conversion factors and the principal abbreviations used in the book will be found in the tables on this page. Stellar data In almost all cases, data for stars are taken from the HIPPARCOS CATALOGUE. The very few exceptions are for instances where the catalogue contains an error of which the editors have been aware. In tables of constellations and elsewhere, the combined magnitude is given for double stars, and the average magnitude for variable stars. Star Maps pages 447–55 Acknowledgements page 456 FRONTMATTER IMAGES Endpapers: Andromeda Galaxy The largest member of the Local Group, this galaxy is the farthest object that can be seen with the naked eye. Half-title: Crab Nebula This nebula is a remnant of a supernova that exploded in the constellation of Taurus in 1054. Opposite title: M83 Blue young stars and red HII emission nebulae clearly mark out regions of star formation in this face-on spiral galaxy in Hydra. Opposite Foreword: NGC 4945 This classic disk galaxy is at a distance of 13 million l.y. Its stars are mainly confined to a flat, thin, circular region surrounding the nucleus. Opposite page 1: Earth This photograph was obtained by the Apollo 17 crew en route to the Moon in 1972 December. SYMBOLS FOR UNITS, CONSTANTS AND QUANTITIES a semimajor axis Å angstrom unit AU astronomical unit c speed of light d distance e eccentricity E energy eV electron-volt f following F focal length, force g acceleration due to gravity G gauss G gravitational constant h hour h Planck constant Ho Hubble constant Hz hertz i inclination IC Index Catalogue Jy jansky k Boltzmann constant K degrees kelvin L luminosity Ln Lagrangian points (n = 1 to 5) l.y. light-year m metre, minute m apparent magnitude, mass mbol bolometric magnitude mpg photographic magnitude mpv photovisual magnitude mv visual magnitude M absolute magnitude, mass (stellar) N newton p preceding P orbital period pc parsec q perihelion distance qo deceleration parameter Q aphelion distance r radius, distance R Roche limit s second t time T temperature (absolute), epoch (time of perihelion passage) Teff effective temperature v velocity W watt y year z redshift α constant of aberration, right ascension δ declination λ wavelength μ proper motion ν frequency π parallax ω longitude of perihelion Ω observed/critical density ratio, longitude of ascending node ° degree [1] arcminute arcsecond Distances 1 nm = 10 Å 1 inch = 25.4 mm 1 mm = 0.03937 inch 1ft = 0.3048 m 1 m = 39.37 inches = 3.2808 ft 1 mile = 1.6093 km 1 km = 0.6214 mile 1 km/s = 2237 mile/h 1 pc = 3.0857 × 1013 km = 3.2616 l.y. = 206,265 AU 1 l.y. = 9.4607 × 1012 km = 0.3066 pc = 63,240 AU Temperatures (to the nearest degree) °C to °F : 1.8, 32 °C to K : 273 °F to °C : 32, 1.8 °F to K : 1.8, 255 K to °C : 273 K to °F : 1.8, 460 Note: To convert temperature differences, rather than points on the temperature scale, ignore the additive or subtractive figure and just multiply or divide.

Weird Astronomy

Author : David A.J. Seargent
ISBN : 144196424X
Genre : Science
File Size : 20. 86 MB
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Weird Astronomy appeals to all who are interested in unusual celestial phenomena, whether they be amateur or professional astronomers or science buffs who just enjoy reading of odd coincidences, unexplained observations, and reports from space probes that "don’t quite fit." This book relates a variety of "unusual" astronomical observations – unusual in the sense of refusing to fit easily into accepted thinking, or unusual in the observation having been made under difficult or extreme circumstances. Although some of the topics covered are instances of "bad astronomy," most are not. Some of the observations recorded here have actually turned out to be important scientific breakthroughs. Included are some amusing anecdotes (such as the incident involving "potassium flares" in ordinary stars and the story of Abba 1, the solar system’s own flare star!), but the book’s purpose is not to ridicule those who report anomalous observations, nor is it to challenge scientific orthodoxy. It is more to demonstrate how what's "weird" often turns out to be far more significant than observations of what we expect to see.

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