infectious fear politics disease and the health effects of segregation studies in social medicine

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Infectious Fear

Author : Samuel Kelton Roberts Jr.
ISBN : 0807894079
Genre : Medical
File Size : 24. 97 MB
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For most of the first half of the twentieth century, tuberculosis ranked among the top three causes of mortality among urban African Americans. Often afflicting an entire family or large segments of a neighborhood, the plague of TB was as mysterious as it was fatal. Samuel Kelton Roberts Jr. examines how individuals and institutions--black and white, public and private--responded to the challenges of tuberculosis in a segregated society. Reactionary white politicians and health officials promoted "racial hygiene" and sought to control TB through Jim Crow quarantines, Roberts explains. African Americans, in turn, protested the segregated, overcrowded housing that was the true root of the tuberculosis problem. Moderate white and black political leadership reconfigured definitions of health and citizenship, extending some rights while constraining others. Meanwhile, those who suffered with the disease--as its victims or as family and neighbors--made the daily adjustments required by the devastating effects of the "white plague." Exploring the politics of race, reform, and public health, Infectious Fear uses the tuberculosis crisis to illuminate the limits of racialized medicine and the roots of modern health disparities. Ultimately, it reveals a disturbing picture of the United States' health history while offering a vision of a more democratic future.

Abortion After Roe

Author : Johanna Schoen
ISBN : 9781469621197
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 67. 82 MB
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Abortion is--and always has been--an arena for contesting power relations between women and men. When in 1973 the Supreme Court made the procedure legal throughout the United States, it seemed that women were at last able to make decisions about their own bodies. In the four decades that followed, however, abortion became ever more politicized and stigmatized. Abortion after Roe chronicles and analyzes what the new legal status and changing political environment have meant for abortion providers and their patients. Johanna Schoen sheds light on the little-studied experience of performing and receiving abortion care from the 1970s--a period of optimism--to the rise of the antiabortion movement and the escalation of antiabortion tactics in the 1980s to the 1990s and beyond, when violent attacks on clinics and abortion providers led to a new articulation of abortion care as moral work. As Schoen demonstrates, more than four decades after the legalization of abortion, the abortion provider community has powerfully asserted that abortion care is a moral good.

Oxford Textbook Of Global Public Health

Author : Roger Detels
ISBN : 9780199661756
Genre : Public health
File Size : 44. 98 MB
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The Oxford Textbook of Global Public Health is the ultimate resource on the subject of public health and epidemiology. The sixth edition has been thoroughly revised and updated, offering a global and comprehensive perspective on wide-ranging public health needs and priorities in modern health care. The sixth edition, available both in print and online, retains its approach of dividing the complex, dynamic subject of public health into three topics. 'The Scope of Public Health' discusses the development of the discipline, determinants of health and disease, public health policies, and law and ethics. Next, the textbook focuses on 'The Methods of Public Health,' including the main science behind the discipline - epidemiology. Finally, 'The Practice of Public Health' examines specific public health problems and the options for prevention and control. As well as identifying these issues by system or disease, there is also an awareness of the unique needs of particular population groups. New topics in this edition include: Climate change, genetic testing and epidemiology; new methods for measuring the burden of disease; life course approaches to epidemiology, behavioural economics; and physical activity, health and wellbeing. Two new editors, Quarraisha Abdool Karim (South Africa) and Chorh Chuan Tan (Singapore), join the established editor team of Roger Detels (USA), and Martin Gulliford (UK), representing a truly global outlook. The contributors are experts who have been drawn from around the world, offering perspectives from vastly different health systems with ranging public health needs and priorities. The Oxford Textbook of Global Public Health remains the most comprehensive, accessible text in the field, and is an essential reference for students and practitioners in public health and epidemiology.

Deluxe Jim Crow

Author : Karen Kruse Thomas
ISBN : 9780820340449
Genre : History
File Size : 77. 41 MB
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"Thomas provides a detailed history of federal health policy as it was applied to the U.S. South in the mid-twentieth century, a period when the region was described as "the number one health problem in the nation." In particular, she focuses on how reformers' early emphasis on across-the-board regional uplift was eclipsed by efforts to desegregate medical facilities and address racial disparities in the health care system"--Provided by publisher.

From Tb To Aids

Author : David McBride
ISBN : 9781438412337
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 74. 66 MB
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Under The Strain Of Color

Author : Gabriel N. Mendes
ISBN : 9781501701399
Genre : HEALTH & FITNESS
File Size : 24. 61 MB
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In Under the Strain of Color, Gabriel N. Mendes recaptures the history of a largely forgotten New York City institution that embodied new ways of thinking about mental health, race, and the substance of citizenship. Harlem's Lafargue Mental Hygiene Clinic was founded in 1946 as both a practical response to the need for low-cost psychotherapy and counseling for black residents (many of whom were recent migrants to the city) and a model for nationwide efforts to address racial disparities in the provision of mental health care in the United States. The result of a collaboration among the psychiatrist and social critic Dr. Fredric Wertham, the writer Richard Wright, and the clergyman Rev. Shelton Hale Bishop, the clinic emerged in the context of a widespread American concern with the mental health of its citizens. It proved to be more radical than any other contemporary therapeutic institution, however, by incorporating the psychosocial significance of antiblack racism and class oppression into its approach to diagnosis and therapy. Mendes shows the Lafargue Clinic to have been simultaneously a scientific and political gambit, challenging both a racist mental health care system and supposedly color-blind psychiatrists who failed to consider the consequences of oppression in their assessment and treatment of African American patients. Employing the methods of oral history, archival research, textual analysis, and critical race philosophy, Under the Strain of Color contributes to a growing body of scholarship that highlights the interlocking relationships among biomedicine, institutional racism, structural violence, and community health activism.

Bulletin Of The History Of Medicine

Author : Henry Ernest Sigerist
ISBN : NWU:35556039245238
Genre : Medicine
File Size : 40. 97 MB
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Bulletin is the official publication of the American Association for the History of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Institute of the History of Medicine. Each issue spans the social and scientific aspects of the history of medicine worldwide and includes reviews of recent books on medical history and information about national and international activities in the field.

Social Causes Of Health And Disease

Author : William C. Cockerham
ISBN : 9780745680750
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 77. 58 MB
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In this stimulating book, William C. Cockerham, a leading medical sociologist, assesses the evidence that social factors (such as stress, poverty, unhealthy lifestyles, and unpleasant living and work conditions) have direct causal effects on health and many diseases. Noting a new emphasis upon social structure in both theory and multi-level research techniques, the author argues that a paradigm shift has been emerging in 21st-century medical sociology, which looks beyond individual explanations for health and disease. The field has headed toward a fundamentally different orientation, and Cockerham’s work has been at the forefront of these changes. The second edition of his compelling account has been thoroughly revised and updated with further contemporary developments, and also includes an expanded discussion of the relationship between race and health as well as new material on health care reform and social policy. This engaging text will be indispensable reading for all students and scholars of medical sociology, especially those with the courage to confront the possibility that society really does make people sick.

Unspeakable

Author : Lynn Sacco
ISBN : 9780801893001
Genre : History
File Size : 84. 87 MB
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This history of father-daughter incest in the United States explains how cultural mores and political needs distorted attitudes toward and medical knowledge of patriarchal sexual abuse at a time when the nation was committed to the familial power of white fathers and the idealized white family. For much of the nineteenth century, father-daughter incest was understood to take place among all classes, and legal and extralegal attempts to deal with it tended to be swift and severe. But public understanding changed markedly during the Progressive Era, when accusations of incest began to be directed exclusively toward immigrants, blacks, and the lower socioeconomic classes. Focusing on early twentieth-century reform movements and that era’s epidemic of child gonorrhea, Lynn Sacco argues that middle- and upper-class white males, too, molested female children in their households, even as official records of their acts declined dramatically. Sacco draws on a wealth of sources, including professional journals, medical and court records, and private and public accounts, to explain how racial politics and professional self-interest among doctors, social workers, and professionals in allied fields drove claims and evidence of incest among middle- and upper-class white families into the shadows. The new feminism of the 1970s, she finds, brought allegations of father-daughter incest back into the light, creating new societal tensions. Against several different historical backdrops—public accusations of incest against "genteel" men in the nineteenth century, the epidemic of gonorrhea among young girls in the early twentieth century, and adult women’s incest narratives in the mid-to late twentieth century—Sacco demonstrates that attitude shifts about patriarchal sexual abuse were influenced by a variety of individuals and groups seeking to protect their own interests.

The Music Has Gone Out Of The Movement

Author : David C. Carter
ISBN : 9781469606576
Genre : History
File Size : 82. 33 MB
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After the passage of sweeping civil rights and voting rights legislation in 1964 and 1965, the civil rights movement stood poised to build on considerable momentum. In a famous speech at Howard University in 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson declared that victory in the next battle for civil rights would be measured in "equal results" rather than equal rights and opportunities. It seemed that for a brief moment the White House and champions of racial equality shared the same objectives and priorities. Finding common ground proved elusive, however, in a climate of growing social and political unrest marked by urban riots, the Vietnam War, and resurgent conservatism. Examining grassroots movements and organizations and their complicated relationships with the federal government and state authorities between 1965 and 1968, David C. Carter takes readers through the inner workings of local civil rights coalitions as they tried to maintain strength within their organizations while facing both overt and subtle opposition from state and federal officials. He also highlights internal debates and divisions within the White House and the executive branch, demonstrating that the federal government's relationship to the movement and its major goals was never as clear-cut as the president's progressive rhetoric suggested. Carter reveals the complex and often tense relationships between the Johnson administration and activist groups advocating further social change, and he extends the traditional timeline of the civil rights movement beyond the passage of the Voting Rights Act.

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