hawaii reader in traditional chinese culture

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Hawai I Reader In Traditional Chinese Culture

Author : Victor H. Mair
ISBN : STANFORD:36105114151546
Genre : History
File Size : 21. 79 MB
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The Hawai'i Reader in Traditional Chinese Culture is a collection of more than ninety primary sources of cultural significance from the Bronze Age to the turn of the twentieth century. Each selection, all but a few of which were translated specifically for this volume, is preceded by a brief introduction that (where pertinent) identifies its author, establishes the context, and raises important issues and questions. Together they take into account virtually every aspect of traditional culture, including sources from the non-Sinitic ethnic minorities. Hawai'i Reader in Traditional Chinese Culture is ideal for undergraduate courses on the history, culture, and society of pre-modern China.

Encyclopedia Of Contemporary Chinese Culture

Author : Edward L. Davis
ISBN : 9780415777162
Genre : History
File Size : 21. 10 MB
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Collects entries on contemporary Chinese culture since 1980, discussing such topics as prisons, underground churches, and rock groups.

Many Faces Of Mulian

Author : Rostislav Berezkin
ISBN : 9780295742533
Genre : History
File Size : 40. 79 MB
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The story of Mulian rescuing his mother�s soul from hell has evolved as a narrative over several centuries in China, especially in the baojuan (precious scrolls) genre. This genre, a prosimetric narrative in vernacular language, first appeared around the fourteenth century and endures as a living tradition. In exploring the evolution of the Mulian story, Rostislav Berezkin illuminates changes in the literary and religious characteristics of the genre. He also examines material from other forms of Chinese literature and from modern performances of baojuan, tracing their transformation from tools of Buddhist proselytizing to sectarian propaganda to folk ritualized storytelling. Ultimately, he reveals the special features of baojuan as a type of performance literature that had its foundations in multiple literary traditions.

Women In China From Earliest Times To The Present

Author : Robin Yates
ISBN : 9789047429661
Genre : Reference
File Size : 35. 69 MB
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This essential reference work is an alphabetic listing, with an extensive index, of more than 2500 citations of books, chapters in books, and articles, and 100+ dissertations in all social science and humanities disciplines relating to women in China from earliest times to today.

China

Author : John Keay
ISBN : 9780465020027
Genre : History
File Size : 86. 43 MB
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Many nations define themselves in terms of territory or people; China defines itself in terms of history. With the world's longest tradition of history-writing, its extraordinary past ought to be common knowledge. China, by the eminent historian John Keay, should make it so. Informed by the latest research and enlivened by wit and anecdote, Keay's narrative spans 5,000 years, from the Three Dynasties (2000–220 BC) to Deng Xiaoping's opening of China and the past three decades of economic growth. Broadly chronological, the book presents a history of all the Chinas—including regions (Yunnan, Tibet, Xinjiang, Mongolia, Manchuria) that account for two-thirds of the People's Republic of China land mass but which barely feature in its conventional history. Crisp, judicious, and engaging, China is destined to become the classic single-volume history for anyone seeking to understand the past, present, and future of this immensely powerful nation.

The Chinese Mind

Author : Charles Alexander Moore
ISBN : 0824800753
Genre : Philosophy
File Size : 66. 15 MB
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"An outstanding document depicting with depth of feeling and intellectual brilliance the very soul of China." --Journal of Asian Studies

China Review International

Author :
ISBN : MINN:31951P01173143L
Genre : China
File Size : 22. 38 MB
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Tea In China

Author : James A. Benn
ISBN : 9789888208739
Genre : History
File Size : 42. 81 MB
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Tea in China explores the contours of religious and cultural transformation in traditional China from the point of view of an everyday commodity and popular beverage. The work traces the development of tea drinking from its mythical origins to the nineteenth century and examines the changes in aesthetics, ritual, science, health, and knowledge that tea brought with it. The shift in drinking habits that occurred in late medieval China cannot be understood without an appreciation of the fact that Buddhist monks were responsible for not only changing people's attitudes toward the intoxicating substance, but also the proliferation of tea drinking. Monks had enjoyed a long association with tea in South China, but it was not until Lu Yu's compilation of the Chajing (The Classic of Tea) and the spread of tea drinking by itinerant Chan monastics that tea culture became popular throughout the empire and beyond. Tea was important for maintaining long periods of meditation; it also provided inspiration for poets and profoundly affected the ways in which ideas were exchanged. Prior to the eighth century, the aristocratic drinking party had excluded monks from participating in elite culture. Over cups of tea, however, monks and literati could meet on equal footing and share in the same aesthetic values. Monks and scholars thus found common ground in the popular stimulant—one with few side effects that was easily obtainable and provided inspiration and energy for composing poetry and meditating. In addition, rituals associated with tea drinking were developed in Chan monasteries, aiding in the transformation of China's sacred landscape at the popular and elite level. Pilgrimages to monasteries that grew their own tea were essential in the spread of tea culture, and some monasteries owned vast tea plantations. By the end of the ninth century, tea was a vital component in the Chinese economy and in everyday life. Tea in China transcends the boundaries of religious studies and cultural history as it draws on a broad range of materials—poetry, histories, liturgical texts, monastic regulations—many translated or analyzed for the first time. The book will be of interest to scholars of East Asia and all those concerned with the religious dimensions of commodity culture in the premodern world.

Kau Kau

Author : Arnold Hiura
ISBN : 0979676932
Genre : Cooking
File Size : 90. 17 MB
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Good Food, Classic Recipes & the Remarkable Story of Hawai'i's Mixed Plate Kau kau: It's the all-purpose pidgin word for food, probably derived from the Chinese "chow chow." On Hawai'i's sugar and pineapple plantations, kau kau came to encompass the amazing range of foods brought to the Islands by immigrant laborers from East and West: Japanese, Portuguese, Filipinos, Puerto Ricans, Koreans and others. On the plantations, lunch break was "kau kau time," and the kau kau could be anything from adobo to chow fun to tsukemono.In Kau Kau: Cuisine and Culture in the Hawaiian Islands, author Arnold Hiura—a writer with roots in the plantation culture—explores the rich history and heritage of food in Hawai'i, with little-known culinary tidbits, interviews with chefs and farmers, and a treasury of rare photos and illustrations.

Chinese Migrant Networks And Cultural Change

Author : Adam McKeown
ISBN : 0226560244
Genre : History
File Size : 80. 24 MB
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Inspired by recent work on diaspora and cultural globalization, Adam McKeown asks in this new book: How were the experiences of different migrant communities and hometowns in China linked together through common networks? Chinese Migrant Networks and Cultural Change argues that the political and economic activities of Chinese migrants can best be understood by taking into account their links to each other and China through a transnational perspective. Despite their very different histories, Chinese migrant families, businesses, and villages were connected through elaborate networks and shared institutions that stretched across oceans and entire continents. Through small towns in Qing and Republican China, thriving enclaves of businesses in South Chicago, broad-based associations of merchants and traders in Peru, and an auspicious legacy of ancestors in Hawaii, migrant Chinese formed an extensive system that made cultural and commercial exchange possible.

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