generations of captivity a history of african american slaves

Download Book Generations Of Captivity A History Of African American Slaves in PDF format. You can Read Online Generations Of Captivity A History Of African American Slaves here in PDF, EPUB, Mobi or Docx formats.

Generations Of Captivity

Author : Ira Berlin
ISBN : 0674020839
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 42. 74 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 459
Read : 358

Download Now


Ira Berlin traces the history of African-American slavery in the United States from its beginnings in the seventeenth century to its fiery demise nearly three hundred years later. Most Americans, black and white, have a singular vision of slavery, one fixed in the mid-nineteenth century when most American slaves grew cotton, resided in the deep South, and subscribed to Christianity. Here, however, Berlin offers a dynamic vision, a major reinterpretation in which slaves and their owners continually renegotiated the terms of captivity. Slavery was thus made and remade by successive generations of Africans and African Americans who lived through settlement and adaptation, plantation life, economic transformations, revolution, forced migration, war, and ultimately, emancipation. Berlin's understanding of the processes that continually transformed the lives of slaves makes "Generations of Captivity" essential reading for anyone interested in the evolution of antebellum America. Connecting the "Charter Generation" to the development of Atlantic society in the seventeenth century, the "Plantation Generation" to the reconstruction of colonial society in the eighteenth century, the "Revolutionary Generation" to the Age of Revolutions, and the "Migration Generation" to American expansionism in the nineteenth century, Berlin integrates the history of slavery into the larger story of American life. He demonstrates how enslaved black people, by adapting to changing circumstances, prepared for the moment when they could seize liberty and declare themselves the "Freedom Generation." This epic story, told by a master historian, provides a rich understanding of the experience of African-American slaves, an experience that continues to mobilize American thought and passions today.

Generations Of Captivity

Author : Ira Berlin
ISBN : 0674016246
Genre : History
File Size : 71. 28 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 496
Read : 1174

Download Now


A comprehensive account of slavery in America retraces the entire tragic history of this terrible institution on the nation, from its origins in the seventeeth century to its eventual destruction during the Civil War.

Transnational Black Dialogues

Author : Markus Nehl
ISBN : 9783839436660
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 52. 7 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 207
Read : 847

Download Now


Markus Nehl focuses on black authors who, from a 21st-century perspective, revisit slavery in the U.S., Ghana, South Africa, Canada and Jamaica. Nehl's provocative readings of Toni Morrison's A Mercy, Saidiya Hartman's Lose Your Mother, Yvette Christiansë's Unconfessed, Lawrence Hill's The Book of Negroes and Marlon James' The Book of Night Women delineate how these texts engage in a fruitful dialogue with African diaspora theory about the complex relation between the local and transnational and the enduring effects of slavery. Reflecting on the ethics of narration, this study is particularly attentive to the risks of representing anti-black violence and to the intricacies involved in (re-)appropriating slavery's archive.

Separate Peoples One Land

Author : Cynthia Cumfer
ISBN : 9781469606590
Genre : History
File Size : 80. 21 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 509
Read : 271

Download Now


Exploring the mental worlds of the major groups interacting in a borderland setting, Cynthia Cumfer offers a broad, multiracial intellectual and cultural history of the Tennessee frontier in the Revolutionary and early national periods, leading up to the era of rapid westward expansion and Cherokee removal. Attentive to the complexities of race, gender, class, and spirituality, Cumfer offers a rare glimpse into the cultural logic of Native American, African American, and Euro-American men and women as contact with one another powerfully transformed their ideas about themselves and the territory they came to share. The Tennessee frontier shaped both Cherokee and white assumptions about diplomacy and nationhood. After contact, both groups moved away from local and personal notions about polity to embrace nationhood. Excluded from the nationalization process, slaves revived and modified African and American premises about patronage and community, while free blacks fashioned an African American doctrine of freedom that was both communal and individual. Paying particular attention to the influence of older European concepts of civilization, Cumfer shows how Tennesseans, along with other Americans and Europeans, modified European assumptions to contribute to a discourse about civilization, one both dynamic and destructive, which has profoundly shaped world history.

African American Slavery And Disability

Author : Dea H. Boster
ISBN : 9781136275319
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 76. 92 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 345
Read : 165

Download Now


Disability is often mentioned in discussions of slave health, mistreatment and abuse, but constructs of how "able" and "disabled" bodies influenced the institution of slavery has gone largely overlooked. This volume uncovers a history of disability in African American slavery from the primary record, analyzing how concepts of race, disability, and power converged in the United States in the first half of the nineteenth century. Slaves with physical and mental impairments often faced unique limitations and conditions in their diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation as property. Slaves with disabilities proved a significant challenge to white authority figures, torn between the desire to categorize them as different or defective and the practical need to incorporate their "disorderly" bodies into daily life. Being physically "unfit" could sometimes allow slaves to escape the limitations of bondage and oppression, and establish a measure of self-control. Furthermore, ideas about and reactions to disability—appearing as social construction, legal definition, medical phenomenon, metaphor, or masquerade—highlighted deep struggles over bodies in bondage in antebellum America.

A Postcolonial African American Re Reading Of Colossians

Author : A. Tinsley
ISBN : 9781137326157
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 38. 60 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 798
Read : 987

Download Now


Written from an African American perspective, this work depicts the presentation of the gospel message to the first-century community of Colossae, their reception of it comparative to the presentation and reception of the same to the enslaved Africans of North America particularly in the eighteenth and the nineteenth centuries.

Major Problems In African American History Loose Leaf Version

Author : Barbara Krauthamer
ISBN : 9781305639942
Genre : History
File Size : 61. 47 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 401
Read : 366

Download Now


Krauthamer and Williams' text introduces students to both primary sources and analytical essays and is designed to encourage critical thinking about the history and culture of African Americans. Updated to cover a wider geographic scope that includes the western United States and other parts of the Diaspora, as well as the newest scholarship in the field, the second edition presents a carefully selected group of readings organized to allow students to evaluate primary sources, test the interpretations of distinguished historians, and draw their own conclusions. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Other Immigrants

Author : David Reimers
ISBN : 9780814775349
Genre : History
File Size : 83. 50 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 174
Read : 524

Download Now


Publisher description: In Other immigrants, David M. Reimers offers the first comprehensive account of non-European immigration, chronicling the compelling and diverse stories of frequently overlooked Americans. Reimers traces the early history of Black, Hispanic, and Asian immigrants from the fifteenth century through World War II, when racial hostility led to the virtual exclusion of Asians and aggression towards Blacks and Hispanics. He also describes the modern state of immigration to the U.S., where Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians made up nearly thirty percent of the population at the turn of the twenty-first century.

Formed From This Soil

Author : Thomas S. Bremer
ISBN : 9781118323540
Genre : Religion
File Size : 20. 5 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 574
Read : 578

Download Now


Formed from This Soil offers a complete history of religion in America that centers on the diversity of sacred traditions and practices that have existed in the country from its earliest days. Organized chronologically starting with the earliest Europeans searching for new routes to Asia, through to the global context of post-9/11 America of the 21st century Includes discussion of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socio-economic class, political affiliations, and other elements of individual and collective identity Incorporates recent scholarship for a nuanced history that goes beyond simple explanations of America as a Protestant society Discusses diverse beliefs and practices that originated in the Americas as well as those that came from Europe, Asia, and Africa Pedagogical features include numerous visual images; sidebars with specialized topics and interpretive themes; discussion questions for each chapter; a glossary of common terms; and lists of relevant resources to broaden student learning

Black Slaves Indian Masters

Author : Barbara Krauthamer
ISBN : 9781469607115
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 61. 5 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 801
Read : 1328

Download Now


From the late eighteenth century through the end of the Civil War, Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians bought, sold, and owned Africans and African Americans as slaves, a fact that persisted after the tribes' removal from the Deep South to Indian Territory. The tribes formulated racial and gender ideologies that justified this practice and marginalized free black people in the Indian nations well after the Civil War and slavery had ended. Through the end of the nineteenth century, ongoing conflicts among Choctaw, Chickasaw, and U.S. lawmakers left untold numbers of former slaves and their descendants in the two Indian nations without citizenship in either the Indian nations or the United States. In this groundbreaking study, Barbara Krauthamer rewrites the history of southern slavery, emancipation, race, and citizenship to reveal the centrality of Native American slaveholders and the black people they enslaved. Krauthamer's examination of slavery and emancipation highlights the ways Indian women's gender roles changed with the arrival of slavery and changed again after emancipation and reveals complex dynamics of race that shaped the lives of black people and Indians both before and after removal.

Top Download:

Best Books