encounters at the heart of the world a history of the mandan people

Download Book Encounters At The Heart Of The World A History Of The Mandan People in PDF format. You can Read Online Encounters At The Heart Of The World A History Of The Mandan People here in PDF, EPUB, Mobi or Docx formats.

Encounters At The Heart Of The World

Author : Elizabeth A. Fenn
ISBN : 9780809042395
Genre : History
File Size : 89. 16 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 103
Read : 1015

Download Now


Draws on important new discoveries in a range of disciplines to chronicle the history of the Mandan Native Americans while sharing revisionist perspectives about their thriving commercial and agricultural practices before European diseases decimated their culture. 15,000 first printing.

Encounters At The Heart Of The World

Author : Elizabeth A. Fenn
ISBN : 9780374711078
Genre : History
File Size : 47. 69 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 360
Read : 860

Download Now


Winner of the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for History Encounters at the Heart of the World concerns the Mandan Indians, iconic Plains people whose teeming, busy towns on the upper Missouri River were for centuries at the center of the North American universe. We know of them mostly because Lewis and Clark spent the winter of 1804-1805 with them, but why don't we know more? Who were they really? In this extraordinary book, Elizabeth A. Fenn retrieves their history by piecing together important new discoveries in archaeology, anthropology, geology, climatology, epidemiology, and nutritional science. Her boldly original interpretation of these diverse research findings offers us a new perspective on early American history, a new interpretation of the American past. By 1500, more than twelve thousand Mandans were established on the northern Plains, and their commercial prowess, agricultural skills, and reputation for hospitality became famous. Recent archaeological discoveries show how these Native American people thrived, and then how they collapsed. The damage wrought by imported diseases like smallpox and the havoc caused by the arrival of horses and steamboats were tragic for the Mandans, yet, as Fenn makes clear, their sense of themselves as a people with distinctive traditions endured. A riveting account of Mandan history, landscapes, and people, Fenn's narrative is enriched and enlivened not only by science and research but by her own encounters at the heart of the world.

Encounters At The Heart Of The World

Author : Elizabeth A. Fenn
ISBN : 0374535116
Genre : History
File Size : 26. 61 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 638
Read : 1004

Download Now


Winner of the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for History Encounters at the Heart of the World concerns the Mandan Indians, iconic Plains people whose teeming, busy towns on the upper Missouri River were for centuries at the center of the North American universe. We know of them mostly because Lewis and Clark spent the winter of 1804-1805 with them, but why don't we know more? Who were they really? In this extraordinary book, Elizabeth A. Fenn retrieves their history by piecing together important new discoveries in archaeology, anthropology, geology, climatology, epidemiology, and nutritional science. Her boldly original interpretation of these diverse research findings offers us a new perspective on early American history, a new interpretation of the American past. By 1500, more than twelve thousand Mandans were established on the northern Plains, and their commercial prowess, agricultural skills, and reputation for hospitality became famous. Recent archaeological discoveries show how these Native American people thrived, and then how they collapsed. The damage wrought by imported diseases like smallpox and the havoc caused by the arrival of horses and steamboats were tragic for the Mandans, yet, as Fenn makes clear, their sense of themselves as a people with distinctive traditions endured. A riveting account of Mandan history, landscapes, and people, Fenn's narrative is enriched and enlivened not only by science and research but by her own encounters at the heart of the world.

Pox Americana

Author : Elizabeth A. Fenn
ISBN : 080907821X
Genre : History
File Size : 56. 62 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 557
Read : 1255

Download Now


Recreates one of the most overlooked chapters in American history--the smallpox epidemic that coincided with the Revolutionary War--tracing its influence on colonial life and the course of the war.

Mandan Social And Ceremonial Organization

Author : Alfred W. Bowers
ISBN : 0803262248
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 77. 65 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 667
Read : 445

Download Now


Generations before the Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery wintered in the northern Plains, the Mandan Indians farmed along the banks of rivers. The traditional world of the Mandans comes vividly to life in this classic account by anthropologist Alfred W. Bowers. Based on years of research and conversations with Crows Heart and ten other Mandan men and women, Bowers offers an engaging and detailed reconstruction of their way of life in earlier times. Featured here are overviews of how their households function, the makeup of their clan and moiety systems and kinship network, and a valuable look at the entire Mandan life cycle, from birth and naming through adulthood, marriage, and death. Mandan Social and Ceremonial Organization also includes descriptions and analyses of Mandan ceremonies, legends, and religious beliefs, including origin myths, the Okipa Ceremony, sacred bundles, Corn ceremonies, the Eagle-Trapping Ceremony, Catfish-Trapping Ceremony, and the Adoption Pipe Ceremony. Many of these practices and beliefs remain vital and relevant for Mandans today. A comprehensive look at the legacy and traditional roots of present-day Mandan culture, Mandan Social and Ceremonial Organization is a classic ethnography of an enduring North American Native community.

Hidatsa Social And Ceremonial Organization

Author : Alfred W. Bowers
ISBN : 0803260989
Genre : History
File Size : 20. 97 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 281
Read : 595

Download Now


Hidatsa Social and Ceremonial Organization, a study of an important horticultural Plains Indian tribe, synthesizes the rich material Alfred W. Bowers recorded in the early 1930s from the last generation of Hidatsas who lived in the historic village of Like-a-Fishhook. This documentary record of their nineteenth-century lifeways is now a classic in American ethnography. The book is distinguished for its presentation of extensive personal and ritual narratives that allow Hidatsa elders to articulate directly their conceptions of traditional culture. It combines archeological and ethnographic approaches to reconstruct a Hidatsa culture history that is shaped by a concern for cultural detail stemming from the American ethnographic tradition of Franz Boas. At the same time, its concern for the understanding of social structure reflects the influence of the British structural-functional approach of A. R. Radcliffe-Brown. The most comprehensive account ever published on the Hidatsas, it is of enduring value and interest.

American Indians In World War I

Author : Thomas A. Britten
ISBN : 0826320902
Genre : History
File Size : 42. 81 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 472
Read : 598

Download Now


During World War I, about 10,000 Native Americans either enlisted or were drafted into the American Expeditionary Force. Three related questions are examined in depth for the first time in this book: What were the battlefield experiences of Native Americans? How did racial and cultural stereotypes about Indians affect their duties? Did their wartime contributions lead to changes in federal Indian policy or their standard of living? Many American Indians distinguished themselves fighting on the Western Front. And as compared to black and Mexican American soldiers, Indians enjoyed near universal respect when in uniform. To celebrate their patriotism during and after the war, Indians could even perform a variety of traditional ceremonies otherwise proscribed. Both in combat and in their support roles on the homefront, including volunteer contributions by Indian women, Native Americans hoped their efforts would result in a more vigorous application of democracy. But the Bureau of Indian Affairs continued to cut health and education programs and to suppress Indian cultures. "This is a first-rate book and a significant contribution to twentieth-century Indian history."--Professor Donald L. Parman

Women Of The Earth Lodges

Author : Virginia Bergman Peters
ISBN : 0806132434
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 21. 60 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 342
Read : 834

Download Now


Originally published: North Haven: Archon Books, 1995.

Common And Contested Ground

Author : Theodore Binnema
ISBN : 0802086942
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 83. 21 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 943
Read : 1143

Download Now


In Common and Contested Ground, Theodore Binnema provides a sweeping and innovative interpretation of the history of the northwestern plains and its peoples from prehistoric times to the Lewis and Clark Expedition. The real history of the northwestern plains between a.d. 200 and 1806 was far more complex, nuanced, and paradoxical than often imagined. Drawn by vast herds of buffalo and abundant resources, Native peoples, fur traders, and settlers moved across the region establishing intricate patterns of trade, diplomacy, and warfare. In the process, the northwestern plains became a common and contested ground. Drawing on a wide range of sources, Binnema examines the impact of technology on the peoples of the plains, beginning with the bow and arrow and continuing through the arrival of the horse, European weapons, Old World diseases, and Euroamerican traders. His focus on the environment and its effect on patterns of behaviour and settlement brings a unique perspective to the history of the region.

Zamumo S Gifts

Author : Joseph M. Hall, Jr.
ISBN : 9780812202144
Genre : History
File Size : 46. 94 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 869
Read : 853

Download Now


In 1540, Zamumo, the chief of the Altamahas in central Georgia, exchanged gifts with the Spanish conquistador Hernando de Soto. With these gifts began two centuries of exchanges that bound American Indians and the Spanish, English, and French who colonized the region. Whether they gave gifts for diplomacy or traded commodities for profit, Natives and newcomers alike used the exchange of goods such as cloth, deerskin, muskets, and sometimes people as a way of securing their influence. Gifts and trade enabled early colonies to survive and later colonies to prosper. Conversely, they upset the social balance of chiefdoms like Zamumo's and promoted the rise of new and powerful Indian confederacies like the Creeks and the Choctaws. Drawing on archaeological studies, colonial documents from three empires, and Native oral histories, Joseph M. Hall, Jr., offers fresh insights into broad segments of southeastern colonial history, including the success of Florida's Franciscan missionaries before 1640 and the impact of the Indian slave trade on French Louisiana after 1699. He also shows how gifts and trade shaped the Yamasee War, which pitted a number of southeastern tribes against English South Carolina in 1715-17. The exchanges at the heart of Zamumo's Gifts highlight how the history of Europeans and Native Americans cannot be understood without each other.

Top Download:

Best Books